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Cognitive Coaching: An Essential Element of Professional Development for T...






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Session Goals. Define and explore the nature of professional developmentReview research on professional development effectivenessDefine cognitive coachingDescribe cognitive coaching processExplore strengths and weaknesses of the cognitive coaching modelAnswer any easy questions. What is profess
Cognitive Coaching: An Essential Element of Professional De...

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1. Cognitive Coaching: An Essential Element of Professional Development for Teaching Librarians Patrick McCarthy Coordinator of Instruction Colorado State University

2. Session Goals Define and explore the nature of professional development Review research on professional development effectiveness Define cognitive coaching Describe cognitive coaching process Explore strengths and weaknesses of the cognitive coaching model Answer any easy questions

3. What is professional development? continuous process of improvement to promote high standards of academic achievement increase personal level of involvement in implementing a continuously improving learning community an ongoing process of collegial dialogue, collaborative learning, and exploration of new and/or proven instructional strategies

4. What are some example of professional development in which you participated? What made them: Successful? Unsuccessful?

5. As teaching librarians, what is our purpose for participation in professional development? Is it for our benefit or the students we teach?

6. Professional Development Research

7. What is Cognitive Coaching? Cognitive coaching is a confidential process through which two professional colleagues work together to reflect on current practices; expand, refine, and build new skills; share ideas; teach one another; and solve problems. Overriding mission is to become more effective teaching. Increase student learning. Effective teaching methods are only as good as the skills of the teacher who uses them. Two peers visit each others classroom in order to help each other improve their teaching skillsOverriding mission is to become more effective teaching. Increase student learning. Effective teaching methods are only as good as the skills of the teacher who uses them. Two peers visit each others classroom in order to help each other improve their teaching skills

8. Goals of Cognitive Coaching Establish and maintain trust Facilitate mutual learning Enhancing growth toward holonomy A reliance on character, ability, or strength in someone else. Most essential part of successful coaching. Have to have a safe atmosphere for change to take place. Engagement in a transformation of mental processes and perceptions. Move beyond your present capacities into new behaviors and skills. Based on an extensive list of knowledge construction and learning theory. Individuals acting autonomously while simultaneously acting interdependently. Like a system working as part of a whole. Teacher as autonomous class but part of a school.A reliance on character, ability, or strength in someone else. Most essential part of successful coaching. Have to have a safe atmosphere for change to take place. Engagement in a transformation of mental processes and perceptions. Move beyond your present capacities into new behaviors and skills. Based on an extensive list of knowledge construction and learning theory. Individuals acting autonomously while simultaneously acting interdependently. Like a system working as part of a whole. Teacher as autonomous class but part of a school.

9. Theoretical Underpinnings The act of teaching is a collection of behaviors These behaviors can be observed singly and in interaction Teacher behavior can be understood and controlled Instructional improvement can be achieved by changing or modifying instructional behaviors

10. Coaching Cycle

11. Pre-Conference Lower level of concern Determine the focus of the observation Describe class context Identify particular component for observation Opportunity to work out any difficulties in the lesson

12. Examples of Observation Focus Do I make my objectives clear to my students? Do I check for understanding often? Do I provide a believable reason why they need to learn the content? What is the level of engagement in the class? Do I teach effectively to each learning style? Do I get my students involved in problem solving activities? Do I effectively connect new learning with things they already understand?

13. Observation Documenting the session Write down exact words Describe behaviors and reactions Can be frustrating

14. Analysis Review Data Identify specific areas where you can provide feedback Knowledge of effective teaching important Summarize impressions Recall data supporting impressions Compare planned with performed teaching decisions Infer relationship between achievement and teacher behavior Summarize impressions Recall data supporting impressions Compare planned with performed teaching decisions Infer relationship between achievement and teacher behavior

15. Post-Conference Establish a relaxed atmosphere Feedback is key to effective coaching Descriptive not Evaluative Specific not General Constructive not Threatening Alterable not Unalterable Solicited not Imposed Precise not Platitudes Suggestions must be bound in observation, followed with questions Refer to what you see and hear Describe behavior as more or less not good or bad Given as soon as possible after observation Share ideas not give advice Don?t give too much to digest Adjust comments to be compatible with receiver Refer to what you see and hear Describe behavior as more or less not good or bad Given as soon as possible after observation Share ideas not give advice Don?t give too much to digest Adjust comments to be compatible with receiver

16. Would you want to adopt this model? What are its strengths? What are some potential obstacles to successful implementation? Is not supervision Takes time Ongoing ?lifelong learning? More sophisticated in our approach to teaching Self-select coaching pairs Is not supervision Takes time Ongoing ?lifelong learning? More sophisticated in our approach to teaching Self-select coaching pairs

17. What questions do you have?

18. Bibliography Barbknecht, Arnold and Connie W. Kieffer. Peer Coaching: The Learning Team Approach. Arlington Heights: SkyLight Professional Development, 2001. Costa, Arthur L. and Robert J. Garmston. Cognitive Coaching : A Foundation for Renaissance Schools, 2 ed. Norwood: Christopher-Gordon, 2002. Garmstom, R., C. Linder and J Whitaker. ?Reflections on Cognitive Coaching.? Educational Leadership 51.2 (1993): 57-61. Horn, Suzanne E., Fern Dallas and Dave Strahan. Peer Coaching in a Professional Development School: The Value of Learning Together as Teachers and Professors, 2002. Joyce, Bruce and Beverly Showers. Power in Staff Development Through Research on Training. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1983. Joyce, Bruce and Beverly Showers. Student Achievement Through Staff Development. New York: Longman, 1988. Raywid, M. A. ?Finding Time for Collaboration.? Educational Leadership 43.3 (1993): 30-33. Showers, Beverly. Peer Coaching: A strategy for Facilitating Transfer of Training. Eugene: Center for Educational Policy and Management, 1984. Showers, Beverly. Transfer of Training: The Contribution of Coaching. Eugene: Center for Educational Policy and Management, 1982. Showers, Beverly and Bruce Joyce. ?The Evolution of Peer Coaching.? Eductional Leadership 53.6 (1996): 12-16.


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