warm up take everything off of your desk except your index cards
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Warm-Up: Take everything off of your desk except your index cards .

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Warm-Up: Take everything off of your desk except your index cards . - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 75 Views
  • Uploaded on

Warm-Up: Take everything off of your desk except your index cards . . If you don’t have index cards, take out 2 clean sheets of paper. . Plot: A series of related events . Setting: where and when the story takes place Conflict: the problem in the story

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Warm-Up: Take everything off of your desk except your index cards . ' - uzuri


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
warm up take everything off of your desk except your index cards

Warm-Up: Take everything off of your desk except your index cards.

If you don’t have index cards, take out 2 clean sheets of paper.

plot a series of related events
Plot: A series of related events
  • Setting: where and when the story takes place
  • Conflict: the problem in the story
  • Rising action: the major events in the story
  • Climax: the turning point of the story
  • Falling Action: the end of the central conflict, when the action starts to wind down
  • Resolution: when all the loose ends of the story are tied up and the conflict is solved.
external conflict character struggles with an outside force
External Conflict: character struggles with an outside force
  • Character vs. character
  • Character vs. nature
  • Character vs. technology
  • Character vs. society
internal conflict character struggles with his her own emotions
Internal Conflict: character struggles with his/her own emotions
  • Making a decision about something
  • Guilt about a past decision
point of view whose perspective the story is told from
Point of View: whose perspective the story is told from
  • First person: narrator is a character in the story
      • Uses personal pronouns (I, me, we, us)
  • Third person: narrator is not a character in the story
      • Third Person limited: the narrator knows the thoughts of only one character
      • Third Person omniscient: the narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of ALL characters
characterization how an author gives you information about a character
Characterization: how an author gives you information about a character
  • Indirect Characterization:
    • What a character says
    • What a character does
    • What others say about the character
    • The character’s appearance
  • Direct Characterization:
    • The author tells you point blank what a character is like
character terms
Character Terms
  • Protagonist: the leading character, hero, or heroine of a drama or other literary work
  • Antagonist: the character who opposes or struggles with the leading character (protagonist)
  • Static character: a character who does not change during the course of the story

Static=Stays the Same

  • Dynamic character: a character who undergoes a major change during the story
  • Motivation: what drives a character to do what they do
  • Trait: characteristics about the character
how does an author keep you engaged in the story
How does an author keep you engaged in the story?
  • Foreshadowing
    • Occurs when the author gives you hints about what is to come in the story
  • Suspense: a feeling of growing tension or excitement—what might happen next?
slide9
Symbolism: the use of something specific to stand for something else, esp. an idea
    • Dove is the universal symbol of peace—the dove can be seen, while peace can not
      • How could an author use symbolism to express an idea in the story?
  • Irony: the contrast between what is expected and what actually happens or exists.
    • Used to add unexpected twists to the story
    • More than just a coincidence
allusion
Allusion
  • A reference in a literary work to a person, place, or thing in history or another work of literature. Allusions are often indirect or brief references to well-known characters or events
    • “The couple danced as though they were Romeo and Juliet”
    • “Should we build an ark?” John asked, after it rained for 5 days straight.
slide11
Theme
    • The moral or idea that the author wants you to take away from the story.
    • Theme must be universal (able to be applied to more than one story), and must be a statement.
      • Examples: Love conquers all. You should hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
slide12
Tone: the writer’s attitude or feeling toward the subject
    • Tone can often be determined by point-of-view
  • Mood: the feeling or atmosphere of the story
    • Created by the use of description, characterization, setting, etc.
ad