Development in Adolescence
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Development in Adolescence. Passage Rites. Performed in over 50% of preindustrialized societies Wesfield calls them “A Crash Course in Adulthood” Four high common steps: Separation Training Initiation Induction. Biological and Physical Changes.

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Development in Adolescence

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Development in adolescence

Development in Adolescence


Passage rites

Passage Rites

  • Performed in over 50% of preindustrialized societies

  • Wesfield calls them “A Crash Course in Adulthood”

  • Four high common steps:

    • Separation

    • Training

    • Initiation

    • Induction


Biological and physical changes

Biological and Physical Changes

  • Biologically, adolescence is the period from onset of puberty to adulthood

    • Pubescence = changes that lead to sexual maturity

    • Puberty = signifies sexual maturity

  • Growth Velocity – 2nd only to infancy

  • Body Composition

  • Primary & Secondary Sexual Characteristics


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.1  Height at 50th percentile for U.S. children. Source: Health Department, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; based on data by H. C. Stuart and H. V. Meredith, prepared for use in Children’s Medical Center, Boston. Used by permission of the Milwaukee Health Department.


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.2  Weight at 50th percentile for U.S. children. Source: Health Department, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; based on data by H. C. Stuart and H. V. Meredith, prepared for use in Children’s Medical Center, Boston. Used by permission of the Milwaukee Health Department.


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.3  Growth curve for fat mass in boys and girls. Distinct average sex differences in ratio of fat-free to fat mass may account for many of the observed sex differences in motor performance. Source: Adapted from Malina & Bouchard, 1991.


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.4  Four sources of concern most often mentioned by middle-class U.S. male and female adolescents. Source: Based on Gibson-Cline (1996), p. 217.


Nutrition eating disorders

Nutrition & Eating Disorders

  • Typical, active adolescent requires 50% more calories during adolescence

  • Many do not get the appropriate nutrition

  • Obesity and dieting

  • Body Mass Index

  • Anorexia

  • Bulimia


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.5 Adults who are overweight (BMI . 27.8 kg/m2 for men and 27.3 for women), and their perceptions/ misperceptions about weight.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1998, p. 154.


Cognitive development major changes in thought

Cognitive Development: Major Changes in Thought

  • Five major changes in adolescent thought

    • Better able to deal with “possible” things

    • Better at thinking about abstract things

    • Think more about the process of thinking

    • More multidimensional (“depends on point of view”)

    • Able to handle less certainty in thinking


Development in adolescence

Figure 11.6 All possible combinations of the four test tubes to which the fifth can be added. The experiment requires the subject to discover the combination(s) that yields a yellow liquid when potassium iodide is added. The correct solutions have a yellow background.


Adolescent egocentrism

Adolescent Egocentrism

  • Not a derogatory term!

  • Cognitive and emotional self-centeredness

  • Imaginary Audience (“what will people think if they see me?”)

  • Personal Fable – A feeling of being special and unique (“It won’t happen to me!”)


Moral development

Moral Development

  • Close link between moral and cognitive development

  • Carroll & Rest suggest 4-Steps in behaving morally:

    • Recognizing a moral problem (sensitivity)

    • Judging what is right and wrong (judgment)

    • Making a plan of action (motivation)

    • Putting the plan into action (action)


Piaget s morality

Piaget’s Morality

  • Two ways of moral thinking:

    • Heteronomous morality 4-7 years

    • Autonomous Morality 10+ years


Kohlberg s moral theory

Kohlberg’s Moral Theory

  • Closely linked to Piaget’s Theory

    • Moral development begins with the self (egocentric)

    • Eventually takes into account others in the immediate context

    • Finally becomes more universal and more independent


Gilligan s view of morality

Gilligan’s View of Morality

  • Suggests women progress from initial selfishness toward a recognition of social responsibility

  • Boys may be more concerned with law and order than with caring and compassion


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