Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non selective hospital menu l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 19

Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non-selective hospital menu PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 607 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non-selective hospital menu. Emily Vautour Dietetic Intern, 2007-2008. Outline of the Presentation. Introduction Procedures and Methods Results Discussion Limitations to the Study Conclusion References. Introduction.

Download Presentation

Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non-selective hospital menu

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non selective hospital menu l.jpg

Improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non-selective hospital menu

Emily Vautour

Dietetic Intern, 2007-2008


Outline of the presentation l.jpg

Outline of the Presentation

  • Introduction

  • Procedures and Methods

  • Results

  • Discussion

  • Limitations to the Study

  • Conclusion

  • References


Introduction l.jpg

Introduction

  • The Cornwall Community Hospital (CCH)

    • 170 bed acute care hospital

    • Foodservice department of approx. 24 FTE

    • Non-selective one-week cycle menu


Introduction cont d l.jpg

Introduction (cont’d)

  • Providing patients with a means to communicatefoodpreferences to foodservices has been associatedwithincreased patient satisfaction with regards to food and foodservices

  • Folio et al. 2002; Stein 2000; Oyarzun et al. 2000; Schwartz & Gudzin 2000

  • Relationship betweenavailability of a foodpreferenceform and foodwastage

    - Unpublishedstudyconducted by 2006-2007 dieteticinternat CCH


Aim of the study l.jpg

Aim of the study

  • To evaluate the possibility of improving patient satisfaction through food preferences for a non-selective hospital menu


Procedures and methods l.jpg

Procedures and Methods

  • Comparing patient satisfaction survey results from 2 groups:

    • Group 1 – did not get a chance to communicate food preferences

    • Group 2 – were offered a chance to communicate food preferences through a Food Preferences Form


Data collection timeline l.jpg

Data Collection Timeline

GROUP 1

GROUP 2


Results l.jpg

Results


Patient satisfaction survey results l.jpg

Patient Satisfaction Survey Results*

*Results are presented by the percentage of the total number of respondents for each variable and group


Patient satisfaction survey results cont d l.jpg

Patient Satisfaction Survey Results* (cont’d)

*Results are presented by the percentage of the total number of respondents for each variable and group


Patient satisfaction survey results cont d11 l.jpg

Patient Satisfaction Survey Results* (cont’d)

*Results are presented by the percentage of the total number of respondents for each variable and group


Summation of high ratings l.jpg

Summation of High Ratings


Discussion l.jpg

Discussion

  • The importance of patient satisfaction

    • Role in achieving overall facility goals

    • Influencing patients’ nutritional status

  • Barriers in achieving patient satisfaction

    • Negative, stereotypical attitude

    • Perception of hospital food influenced by illness and medications

    • Repetitiveness of the non-selective seven-day cycle menu


Discussion cont d l.jpg

Discussion (cont’d)

  • Non-selective menu vs. patient-focused foodservice system

    • Deciding factors for keeping the non-selective menu system for the study

      • Limited time frame

      • Cost associated with the transition

      • Lots of planning

    • Addition of a Food Preference form was more practical in terms of time and cost


Limitations to the study l.jpg

Limitations to the Study

  • Small sample size of Group 2

  • Appropriateness of Patient Satisfaction Survey

  • Some patients from Group 1 seen by RD for food preferences prior to start of study


Conclusion l.jpg

Conclusion

  • Upward trend observed, however not statistically significant

  • Existing barriers to achieving patient satisfaction

  • Other possible benefits of having the Food Preference Form

    • Faster response to patients’ requests

    • Less of RD’s time used for dealing with food preferences


References l.jpg

References

Bélanger MC & Dubé L. The emotional experience of hospitalization: Its moderators and its role in patient satisfaction with foodservices. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1996:96:354-360 

Cardello AV, Bell R, & Kramer FM. Attitudes of consumers toward military and other institutional foods. Food Quality and Preference. 1996:7(1):7-20 

Donini LM, Castellaneta E, De Guglielmi S et al. Improvement in the quality of the catering service of a rehabilitation hospital. Clinical Nutrition. 2008:27(1):105-114. 

Folio D, O’Sullivan-Maillet J & Touger-Decker R. The spoken menu concept of patient foodservice delivery systems increases overall patient satisfaction, therapeutic and tray accuracy, and is cost neutral for food and labor. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2002:102(4):546-548. 

Huang HC & Shanklin CW. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints’ effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2008:108:785-792. 

Lafferty L & Dowling RA. Position of The American Dietetic Association: management of health care food and nutrition services. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1997:97(12):1427-1430.

Oyarzun VE, Lafferty LJ, Gregoire, MB et al. Evaluation of efficiency and effectiveness measurements of a foodservice system that included a spoken menu. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2000:100(4):460-463.

Petnicki PJ, Jatho GJ & McNamee CK. Benefits of a just-in-time spoken patient menu.Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1998:98(9):(Suppl.1)

Pronsky ZM. Food-Medication Interactions, 14th ed. Birchrunville: Food-Medication Interactions, 2006. 

Schwartz DB & Gudzin D. Preadmission nutrition screening: Expanding hospital-based nutrition services by implementing earlier nutrition intervention. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2000:100(1):81-87.

Smith KR. How to satisfy preferences of rehab residents in a nonselect menu facility. Health Care Food & Nutrition Focus. 2003:20(6):8-9.

Sridhar MK & Lean MEJ. Nutritional consequences of disease. Medicine. 2006:34(12):530-532.

Stanga Z, Zurflüh Y, Roselli M et al. Hospital Food: a survey of patients’ perceptions. Clinical Nutrition. 2003:23(3):241-246

Stein K. Diet office redesign to enhance satisfaction and reduce costs. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2000:100(5):512. 

Williams R, Virtue K, & Adkins A. Room service improves patient foodintake and satisfaction withhospitalfood. Journal of PediatricOncology Nursing. 1998:15(3):183-9.


Questions l.jpg

Questions


Thank you l.jpg

Thank you


  • Login