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STEM in New Hampshire NH STEM Talent Pipeline Analysis June 2014. NH STEM Pipeline Study Goals. This study will: M ap major STEM achievement and assets (initiatives, programs, etc.) across the state along the K12-postsecondary-workforce continuum

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Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

STEM in New Hampshire

NH STEM Talent Pipeline Analysis

June 2014


Nh stem pipeline study goals

NH STEM Pipeline Study Goals

This study will:

  • Map major STEM achievement and assets (initiatives, programs, etc.) across the state along the K12-postsecondary-workforce continuum

  • Identify strengths and gaps in STEM talent and alignment to workforce needsin critical STEM industries in the state

  • Develop recommendations and a draft framework for action for New Hampshire to inform collaborative state-wide strategic action to advance the state’s STEM talent pipeline

    See slides 24-27 for details of STEM Talent Pipeline Analysis and background data

Designed to inform and align statewide STEM efforts and facilitate collective action to better meet STEM needs and advance STEM outcomes in New Hampshire


Highest impact recommendations

Highest Impact Recommendations

1

Formalize a statewide STEM Leadership Coalition and create a focused action plan, with agreed-upon goals, progress monitoring, and accountability

2

Increase expectations and accountability through Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and high school graduation requirements

3

Strengthen math and science teacher preparation programs, accountability and public reporting, and streamline alternative licensure process

4

Increase the number of STEM industry pathways with a purpose that provide seamless course work and advising from high school through two and four year STEM degrees

5

Redesign developmental and gateway math courses to increase outcomes and align with specific STEM credentials/degrees and industry needs (both technical and soft skill)

6

Increase industry partnerships with K12 and postsecondary education to expose students to career opportunities and strengthen the connection between learning and application of knowledge in the real world

7

Work to change the value proposition and culture of STEM in NH

See slides 10-23 for more detail on recommendations


Nh stem pipeline what we ve learned

NH STEM Pipeline: What We’ve Learned

  • Even in your high performing state, the STEM Pipeline narrows early and relentlessly

  • There is a great deal of STEM activity outside the classroom, but it is difficult to judge the true impact on student achievement and interest

  • Greatest opportunities for increasing STEM talent are impacting three key points in the pipeline:

    • Science in grades K-8

    • Math in grades 8-13 (first year postsecondary)

    • Increased number of candidates in programs fully aligned to employer needs in computer systems (networking, programming, software development) and engineering (electrical, mechanical, industrial)

  • It will require leadership focus and alignment, policy change, program redesign and accountability

For detailed information on pipeline gaps, please see slides 35 & 36. For detailed information on STEM programs, see Asset Database & Heat Map


Nh stem pipeline narrows through outcomes attrition

NH STEM Pipeline: Narrows through Outcomes & Attrition


Nh stem pipeline detail math science teacher availability effectiveness

NH STEM Pipeline Detail: Math & Science Teacher Availability & Effectiveness

  • NH is producing roughly half of the math and science teachers needed for current openings

    • New licensure changes have a focus on content depth; but alternative licensure processes may need additional streamlining to help increase numbers

  • NH teacher preparation programs are not ranked highly by national sources

    • The public university system carries the greatest share of the teacher preparation burden

    • Depth of educator math and science content knowledge is critical; with increased licensure requirements, teacher prep programs must up their game

  • Practicing math and science teachers need more effective support

    • Teacher effectiveness and evaluation model will help differentiate needs of practicing teachers

    • Focus and increase effective teacher professional development

    • Differentiate recruitment, retention and compensation strategies where needed

Source: NHDOE, NCTQ Teacher Prep Review 2013: http://www.nctq.org/dmsView/Teacher_Prep_Review_2013_Report,,


Teacher prep programs not producing sufficient number of candidates in high need disciplines

Teacher prep programs not producing sufficient number of candidates in high need disciplines.

Source: 2013 Teacher Program Completers Report, 2013, NHDOE Division of Program Support, Bureau of Credentialing


Nh pipeline contextual challenges

NH Pipeline: Contextual Challenges

  • In a local control environment, there is a lack of authority to mandate or focus schools and institutions on practices that strengthen the STEM talent pipeline

  • Various institutions have created plans or invested resources in STEM efforts – such as the postsecondary system’s commitment to doubling the number of STEM graduates, but there is little or no accountability for strong implementation or reaching outcomes

  • There is little or no evidence of coordination among programs, across the pipeline within regions or statewide

  • Many postsecondary programs are not accountable for assuring full and tight alignment of skills and outcomes with industry demand, boosting student persistence or specific program completer numbers, so industries – and specific companies – have stepped up to create programs to prepare the talent they need


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

Highest Impact Recommendations

Details


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

Formalize a statewide STEM Leadership Coalition and create a focused action plan, with agreed-upon goals, progress monitoring, and accountability

1

Recommendation Details

  • Build upon multi-sector leadership interest, significant business commitment.

  • Coalition would advocate and coordinate a focused action plan, including Recommendations 2 – 7.

  • Incorporate existing higher education goal to double the number of STEM graduates, as well as goals for other portions of the system (commitment to goals with a structure to track outcomes will make the work attractive to funders such as Lumina).

    Team to Advance the Work

  • The NH Coalition on Business and Education and the Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing Education Advisory Council are well positioned to advance this recommendation.

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Monitoring and tracking of CCSNH and UNSH progress towards shared STEM goals has not been well defined or implemented.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

Increase expectations and accountability through Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and high school graduation requirements

2

Recommendation Details

  • K12 performance exceeds expectations given the current graduation requirements; but these requirements seriously lag other states.

  • Strongly encourage full implementation of the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

    • Common Core requires real world learning and inquiry-based instruction, tailor-made to develop STEM students

    • NGSS includes engineering, process and content standards, and technology and active lab experience,

    • Both encourage real world problem solving in the classroom, such as happens at FIRST Robotics

  • Determine what specific math preparation (Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus, Statistics, etc.) students need for graduation and to successfully earn postsecondary STEM credentials and increase graduation requirements.

  • Encourage school districts to accomplish this preparation through competency-based means that prepare students to meet and exceed expectations and move seamlessly through early college credit experiences.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

2

Increase expectations and accountability through Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and high school graduation requirements

Team to Advance the Work

  • Governor Hassan’s new STEM Task Force is well positioned to advance this recommendation.

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • NH sets the bar for passing its 8th grade science test very high but it only holds schools accountable for meeting student performance targets in reading and math tests. Currently, science requirements do not include lab-based experience.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

3

Strengthen math and science teacher preparation programs, accountability and public reporting, and streamline alternative licensure process

Recommendation Details

  • NH teacher prep pipeline does not produce sufficient numbers of prepared completers to fill the needed vacancies. The public higher education system has the primary responsibility for producing teachers for NH and must change to better prepare candidates to meet new licensure requirements.

  • Consider implementing highly effective program models such as UTeach in the program refinement process.

  • Clearly identify the depth of math knowledge needed by teacher candidates for the subjects they will be teaching.

  • Build upon the teacher licensure and evaluation/effectiveness work already in place by streamlining alternative licensure to accommodate individuals with deep content knowledge.

  • Focus investments on filling gaps math and science teacher professional development, but only on programs with demonstrated success.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

3

Strengthen math and science teacher preparation programs, accountability and public reporting, and streamline alternative licensure process

Team to Advance the Work

  • The Commissioner of the Department of Education and Chancellors are best positioned to advance this recommendation.

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Recent teacher licensure changes have raised the bar, but it will take time for teacher prep to ramp up.

  • Differentiated salaries, recruitment, support or retention strategies for math and science teachers are not in place and could be helpful.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

4

Increase the number of STEM industry pathways with a purpose that provide seamless course work and advising from high school through two- and four-year STEM degrees

Recommendation Details

  • Continue and expand establishment of STEM-focused Career & Technical Education programs that earn significant early college credit and have partnerships with 2 and 4 year institutions.

  • Establish early-college high school models in concert with community colleges across the state.

    Team to Advance the Work

  • This recommendation will be referred to the Governor's STEM Education Task Force and the Advanced Manufacturing Education Advisory Council for their consideration. It also will be advanced by a partnership between the Lumina Foundation, the Charitable Foundation, employers, educators, and government partners.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

4

Increase the number of STEM industry pathways with a purpose that provide seamless course work and advising from high school through two- and four-year STEM degrees

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Develop default degree maps and intrusive advising for high need programs.

  • CTE office is forging pathways and partnerships for K12 students, particularly in manufacturing, but struggles to get significant traction because of funding, constraints, lack of awareness and support from school counselors and challenges coordinating with postsecondary institutions.

  • Pilot collaborations and dual credit programs with K12 are growing but are not widespread. CTE collaborations for college credit are stronger with CCSNH than with USNH.

  • Institute statewide transfer and articulation of degree mapped programs. Transfer articulation and collaboration agreements between PS institutions have been slow to materialize and NHTransfer.org is not up to date. CCSNH and USNH are beginning to collaborate on articulation agreements and true 2+2 programs.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

5

Redesign developmental and gateway math courses to increase outcomes and align with specific STEM credentials/degrees and industry needs (both technical and soft skill)

Recommendation Details

  • Identify the right math for the program or job path, including the appropriate developmental math and first-year math for STEM majors.

    • Identify and scale the best practices in developmental and first-year math delivery, with specific consideration of co-curricular models and increased support in gateway courses.

  • Incorporate communication and other skills that employers value within STEM programs.

  • Include a specific focus in computer science and engineering programs (electrical, mechanical, industrial) to meet employer demand.

    Team to Advance the Work

  • The University System and Community College System Chancellors are well positioned to advance this recommendation.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

5

Redesign developmental and gateway math courses to increase outcomes and align with specific STEM credentials/degrees and industry needs (both technical and soft skill)

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Lack of mandate to take a system-wide approach to applying best practices in developmental math and other STEM initiatives.

  • Expand practice of surveying employers to identify gaps in offerings

  • While there has been recent investment in manufacturing-related degrees and partnerships to meet employer demand, there is a shortage of candidates to fill in-demand STEM occupations, including software developers, engineers, computer systems managers and analysis, dentists and dental hygienists.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

6

Increase industry partnerships with K12 and postsecondary education to expose students to career opportunities and strengthen the connection between learning and application of knowledge in the real world

Recommendation Details

  • Encourage school/employer partnerships featuring applied lessons that showcase use of STEM in careers (building on partnerships like the NH Scholars and Junior Achievement programs).

  • Challenge employers to provide research and internship opportunities for students to experience STEM industries and projects.

  • Provide opportunities for teachers to experience STEM work environments and projects to increase their own knowledge of the opportunities STEM students have.

    Team to Advance the Work

  • The NH Coalition for Business and Education, the Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing Education Advisory Council, and the state’s EPSCoR Committee along with other business partners are likely partners for this work.


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

Increase industry partnerships with K12 and postsecondary education to expose students to career opportunities and strengthen the connection between learning and application of knowledge in the real world

6

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Employer partnerships with K12 and postsecondary are spotty throughout the state.

  • Internships have increased but more are needed for STEM-interested students.

  • Formalize and increase STEM internship experiences, including those linked with postsecondary learning and long-term employment.

  • Identify the top 2-3 workforce training programs for meeting current and future workforce needs and replicate or scale regionally.

  • Evaluate the employer-driven training programs to consider credit earning opportunities with community colleges.

  • Consider formally aligning the successful state workforce training and placement system with STEM occupations to the extent possible.

  • Sampling of in- and out-of-school K12 programs reveals potential programming gaps in Lakes, Southwest and Nashua regions. Across the state, science programs are the most represented, and math is the most underrepresented.

  • Workforce agency average job placement salaries are low. Agency may not be placing clients in jobs in STEM industries or with future potential for growth.

  • Employer and private programs are seeing a need for training for middle skill jobs at the certificate level. Some employer sponsored programs are now joining forces with community colleges for joint credit.


Work to change the value proposition and culture of stem in nh

Work to change the value proposition and culture of STEM in NH

7

Recommendation Details

  • Publicly illustrate the value of STEM learning and its ties to industry/careers and the economy, through efforts such as a branding and public information campaigns.

  • Showcase and celebrate STEM learning experiences and accomplishments at the local and state levels , and seek national visibility during the NH primary.

  • Beginning in elementary grades, link STEM career opportunities directly to pathways and postsecondary majors, to encourage students and parents to choose the schools, courses and pathways early.

    Team to Advance the Work

  • This recommendation will need to be advanced collectively by employers, educators, government, foundations, and media and community partners.


Work to change the value proposition and culture of stem in nh1

Work to change the value proposition and culture of STEM in NH

7

  • Additional Considerations and Context

  • Focused and sustained outreach to school counselors and parent community about the value of STEM careers and the pathways for getting there.

  • Align and scale in- and out-of-school programs with academic standards and scale those that are most effective.

  • Conduct STEM Interest Survey at multiple grade levels.

  • Lack of centralized marketing of and recruiting for STEM pathways at CCSNH, beyond manufacturing.

  • Participate in state and regional STEM network activity to align STEM pipeline

    • Follow ampednh.org’s lead and streamline the delivery of information to potential STEM candidates.

    • Encourage and support increased early college credit experiences (dual enrollment, AP, IB).


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

Details of the STEM Talent Pipeline Analysis


Synthesis of m ultiple s ources

Synthesis of Multiple Sources

  • Includes benchmarking of progress nationally and states, particularly regional neighbors

  • Includes formal interviews and input during meetings and follow-up conversations

  • Includes website and phone research on students and regions served and outcomes. Extremely limited information was shared by programs, and no efficacy data on third-party programs.


Interviews

Interviews


Consultation with core team and meeting participants

Consultation with Core Team and Meeting Participants


Data sources

Data Sources

  • NH Business And Technology Plan, EPSCOR (October 2011)

  • STEM in New Hampshire: A Labor Demand-Supply Analysis, ELMI (April 2013)

  • STRATEGIC ECONOMIC PLAN FOR NEW HAMPSHIRE, BIA of NH (November 2013)

  • U.S Department of Education (CTE, NCES, IPEDS, NAEP)

  • Partnership for Attainment: Regional Indicators, Brookings Institute (December 2013)

  • New Hampshire Demographic Trends in the Twenty-First Century, Kenneth Johnson (2012)

  • Policy Snapshot: Assessing and Increasing College Readiness in New England, NHBHE (September 2012)

  • New Hampshire Higher Education Dashboard, NGA

  • AP® Report to the Nation, College Board (February 2012)

  • Workforce Opportunity Council Annual Report

  • STEM, Anthony Carnevale (2011)

  • New Hampshire Employment Projections by Industry and Occupation, ELMI

  • STEM Occupation Charts & Completer Data, ELMI

  • NH Bankers Association NH Business Community Sentiment Survey, The Survey Center University of New Hampshire (2012)

  • New Hampshire Fact Sheet, ACTE

  • Milken Institute State Science and Technology Index

  • Graduation in the United States, Education Week (2012)

  • RI NECAP Data

  • VT NECAP Data

  • College Readiness Benchmark Attainment by State, ACT

  • GPS in STEM Careers: STEM Landscape Research Outline, CCA (draft January 2014)

  • NH Vital Signs, Change the Equation (September 2012)

  • Teacher Prep Review, NCTQ (June 2013)

  • Regional Planning Commissions Map, NH Office of Energy and Planning (January 2013)

  • U.S. Census Bureau

  • Individual websites for programs, initiatives, and institutions: please see Asset Map database for specific references


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

How New Hampshire Stacks Up


K 12 outcomes how nh stacks up

K-12 Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Sources: New Hampshire Department of Education, “State Profile,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://my.doe.nh.gov/profiles/profile.aspx?oid=&s=&d=&year=&tab=testresults. Rhode Island Department of Education, “NECAP Released Items,” accessed October 29, 2013, http://www.ride.ri.gov/InstructionAssessment/Assessment/NECAPAssessment/NECAPReleasedItems.aspx. Vermont's Education Data Warehouse for the Public, “Report by Grade”, accessed October 27, 2013, http://edw.vermont.gov/REPORTSERVER/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?/Public/Assessment. NHDOE Division of Program Support, Bureau of Credentialing. Change the Equation, Vital Signs New Hampshire (2014), accessed January 16, 2014, http://vitalsigns.changetheequation.org/tcpdf/vitalsigns/newsletter.php?statename=New Hampshire. National Assessment of Educational Progress, “State Profiles,” accessed October 29, 2013, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/states/.

*Note: MA is not included in comparison data because it does not use the NECAP assessment

**K-12 figure


K 12 outcomes how nh stacks up1

K-12 Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Sources: New Hampshire Department of Education, “State Profile,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://my.doe.nh.gov/profiles/profile.aspx?oid=&s=&d=&year=&tab=testresults. Rhode Island Department of Education, “NECAP Released Items,” accessed October 29, 2013, http://www.ride.ri.gov/InstructionAssessment/Assessment/NECAPAssessment/NECAPReleasedItems.aspx. Vermont's Education Data Warehouse for the Public, “Report by Grade”, accessed October 27, 2013, http://edw.vermont.gov/REPORTSERVER/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?/Public/Assessment. NHDOE Division of Program Support, Bureau of Credentialing. Change the Equation, Vital Signs New Hampshire (2014), accessed January 16, 2014, http://vitalsigns.changetheequation.org/tcpdf/vitalsigns/newsletter.php?statename=New Hampshire. National Assessment of Educational Progress, “State Profiles,” accessed October 29, 2013, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/states/.

*Note: MA is not included in comparison data because it does not use the NECAP assessment

**K-12 figure


K 12 other outcomes how nh stacks up

K-12 Other Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Sources:

New Hampshire Department of Education, “State Profile,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://my.doe.nh.gov/profiles/profile.aspx?oid=&s=&d=&year=&tab=testresults. Rhode Island Department of Education, “NECAP Released Items,” accessed October 29, 2013, http://www.ride.ri.gov/InstructionAssessment/Assessment/NECAPAssessment/NECAPReleasedItems.aspx. Vermont's Education Data Warehouse for the Public, “Report by Grade”, accessed October 27, 2013, http://edw.vermont.gov/REPORTSERVER/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?/Public/Assessment. College Board, AP Report to the Nation, accessed October 27, 2013. ACT, College Readiness Benchmark Attainment by State, accessed October 27, 2013, http://www.act.org/newsroom/data/2012/benchmarks.html. Perkins Collaborative Resource Network. NHDOE Career Development Bureau. Association for Career and Technical Education, New Hampshire Fact Sheet, accessed October 25, 2013. Education Week, Graduation in the United States (2012), accessed October 27, 2013, http://www.edweek.org/media/ew/dc/2012/Graduation-in-the-US-table.pdf.

*Note: MA is not included in comparison data because it does not use the NECAP assessment **K-12 figure


Postsecondary outcomes how nh stacks up

Postsecondary Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Source: NCES, IPEDS Fall 2010 Enrollment Retention Rate File, accessed October 27, 2013. Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau & New Hampshire Employment Security, STEM in New Hampshire: A Labor Demand-Supply Analysis (2013). NCHEMS, College-Going Rates of High School Graduates - Directly from High School, accessed October 29, 2013. Michael Brindley, “Remedial math courses costly for students, colleges,” Nashua Telegraph, May 16, 2011. Community College Research Center, “Community College FAQs,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/Community-College-FAQs.html. U.S. Department of Education, Postsecondary Awards in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, by State: 2001 and 2009 (2011), accessed October 29, 2013, http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2011/2011226.pdf. Milken Institute, “State Technology and Science Index,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://statetechandscience.org/statetech.taf?page=overall-ranking&composite=hcic&sub2=bachscieng. Brookings Institute, State of New Hampshire Partnership for Attainment: Regional Indicators (2013). Change the Equation, Vital Signs New Hampshire (2014), accessed January 16, 2014, http://vitalsigns.changetheequation.org/tcpdf/vitalsigns/newsletter.php?statename=New Hampshire.


Postsecondary outcomes how nh stacks up1

Postsecondary Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Source: NCES, IPEDS Fall 2010 Enrollment Retention Rate File, accessed October 27, 2013. Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau & New Hampshire Employment Security, STEM in New Hampshire: A Labor Demand-Supply Analysis (2013). NCHEMS, College-Going Rates of High School Graduates - Directly from High School, accessed October 29, 2013. Michael Brindley, “Remedial math courses costly for students, colleges,” Nashua Telegraph, May 16, 2011. Community College Research Center, “Community College FAQs,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/Community-College-FAQs.html. U.S. Department of Education, Postsecondary Awards in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, by State: 2001 and 2009 (2011), accessed October 29, 2013, http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2011/2011226.pdf. Milken Institute, “State Technology and Science Index,” accessed October 27, 2013, http://statetechandscience.org/statetech.taf?page=overall-ranking&composite=hcic&sub2=bachscieng. Brookings Institute, State of New Hampshire Partnership for Attainment: Regional Indicators (2013). Change the Equation, Vital Signs New Hampshire (2014), accessed January 16, 2014, http://vitalsigns.changetheequation.org/tcpdf/vitalsigns/newsletter.php?statename=New Hampshire.


Workforce outcomes how nh stacks up

Workforce Outcomes: How NH Stacks Up

Red font = challenge area (metric is below national average or region average)

Black font = on point or strong (metric is at or above national average or region average)

Sources: Brookings Institute, State of New Hampshire Partnership for Attainment: Regional Indicators (2013). NH Office of Workforce Opportunity. Andrew E. Smith, et al., New Hampshire Bankers Association NH Business Community Sentiment Survey 2012 (Durham, NH: The Survey Center at the University of New Hampshire, 2012). Stay, Work, Play New Hampshire, “What SWP Is All About,” accessed February 20, 2014, http://stayworkplay.org/about-us/what-swp-all-about/.

Survey, 2012, stayworkplay.org


Gaps in the workforce top stem job gaps excluding healthcare

Gaps in the Workforce: Top STEM Job Gaps(excluding Healthcare)

Source: Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau & New Hampshire Employment Security, STEM in New Hampshire: A Labor Demand-Supply Analysis (2013)


Gaps in the workforce top stem healthcare job gaps

Gaps in the Workforce: Top STEM Healthcare Job Gaps

Source: Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau & New Hampshire Employment Security, STEM in New Hampshire: A Labor Demand-Supply Analysis (2013)


Stem in new hampshire nh stem talent pipeline analysis june 2014

  • Best Practices from Other States


State structures different approaches based on state needs

State Structures: Different Approaches Based on State Needs

Public/Private Partnership

Independent 501c3

Government-Led Initiative

Non-Profit/ Foundation Led Initiative

  • Massachusetts and Iowa – appointed agency personnel to work with multi-sector representatives to develop and implement statewide plan with significant leadership from statewide elected leaders

  • Washington STEM – a privately funded business and education driven non-profit organization; developed strategy and worked with elected officials to codify development of a STEM strategic plan

  • California STEM Learning Network – a privately funded non-profit focused on bringing regional networks together to coordinate and advocate for STEM education in the state; it issued it’s strategic plan this year

  • Ohio STEM Learning Network – managed by Battelle, is a network of regional leaders with a common voice on STEM that provide both advocacy and implementation support

  • Arizona STEM Network – housed at the Science Foundation AZ, the Network has public and private funding and coordinates a 5-year plan

  • North Carolina STEM Learning Network works in partnership with public K12 and higher education systems and Battelle Memorial Institute and others to coordinate a statewide STEM strategy

  • Educate Texas – a public-private partnership housed at the Community Foundations of Texas originally formed to start and support STEM and early college high schools; worked in concert with elected officials to identify key strategic plan elements and pursue them


Examples from other states texas

Examples from Other States: Texas

Educate Texas Blueprint for STEM Schools

  • The T-STEM initiative’s goal is to closely align high school curriculum with admission requirements of competitive colleges and the STEM qualifications for 21st century jobs, and the T-STEM academies act as demonstration sites to inform math and science teaching and learning statewide.

  • The Blueprint is a guide for building and sustaining STEM schools and incorporates seven benchmarks:

    • Mission driven leadership;

    • T-STEM culture;

    • Student outreach, recruitment and retention;

    • Teacher selection, development and retention;

    • Curriculum, instruction and assessment;

    • Strategic alliances; and

    • Academy advancement and sustainability.

Source: http://www.edtx.org/uploads/general/pdf-downloads/misc-PDFs/EDTX_TSTEM_Academyblueprint.pdf


Examples from other states washington

Examples from Other States: Washington

Washington STEM

Framework for Action

  • Washington STEM has developed a STEM Framework for Action to help align and guide efforts to improve STEM education and workforce outcomes throughout Washington State.

  • The Framework will recognize and identify indicators, strategies, and policies which are important for driving STEM education forward as well as critical milestone indicators in sectors that desperately need attention and represent areas which are critical for success in promoting STEM literacy and workforce capacity.


Examples from other states massachusetts

Examples from Other States: Massachusetts

Massachusetts’ Plan for Excellence in STEM Education

  • The Plan was developed by the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, a group of STEM advocates and leaders from the private and public sectors; legislators; and educators.

  • The plan outlines the state’s key goals and makes recommendations for policy and best practice programs in STEM education.

  • The plan is still guiding their work, including and innovation fund they use to bolster innovative practices/programs.

Source: http://www.mass.gov/governor/administration/ltgov/documents/ma-stem-plan-9-28-10.pdf


Examples from other states ohio

Examples from Other States: Ohio

Ohio STEM Learning Network STEM Advocacy Kit

  • The Advocacy Kit serves as a tool to promote STEM education in Ohio and strengthen support among Ohioans for continued STEM education investments.

  • Key messages and strategies include:

    • Promote STEM education as a key strategy for workforce development.

    • Highlight the importance of committed, engaged community partners who are willing to leverage their own resources to support the development of STEM education.

    • Emphasize that the STEM education footprint in Ohio is large and provides broad public benefit.

    • Characterize difficult economic conditions as a rationale for protecting the state’s investment in STEM education.

  • This toolkit has served as a model for other states, such as CA, TN and others.

Source: http://www.osln.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Ohio-AdvoKit.pdf


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