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Common ICT Capability Government Services. Managing the Data Flood. Agenda. A bit about me Common Capabilities - Opinion The Future (is now) – The coming Data Flood How Common Capabilities can support that direction Questions. Isis Group.

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agenda
Agenda
  • A bit about me
  • Common Capabilities - Opinion
  • The Future (is now) – The coming Data Flood
  • How Common Capabilities can support that direction
  • Questions
isis group
Isis Group
  • Small company that is focussed on transformational change of business and ICT
  • Primary work is currently moving government agencies (mostly) to take up Cloud (in various forms), through Common Capabilities (mostly), and implementing Service Management to support those new technologies
  • A bit about me:
    • Twenty Five years in the industry
    • Freelance writing and blogging for about the same (various publications, currently National Business Review and CIO.com amongst others)
    • Author of two books “How to migrate your ICT services to Cloud” and “Wellington as a Smart City”
    • Have worked with and researched Common Capability for some time, these are my personal views and opinion
common capabilities fit in a world of government services
Common Capabilities Fit in a world of Government Services
  • Designed to encourage government agencies to share services, save money, and support better Public Service
  • Generally managed by the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) and consist of sixteen individual services
  • Not to be confused with All of Government services
  • Is a mixture of products, services, directives, and can be confusing
  • Some are “mandated” some are not
  • Some are very well constructed and some are not
common capability grouping
Common Capability - Grouping
  • Licensing: Microsoft, Large Account Reseller
  • Telecommunications: One.Govt
  • Security: ICT Security Panel, RealMe, SEEMail
  • Cloud: Infrastructure, Desktop, and Office Productivity
  • Web Tools: Common Web Platform and Common Web Services
  • Information Management: Enterprise Content Management
  • Open Data: Confirmation Service
licensing
Licensing
  • Allows government to save money through bulk purchasing by joining contracts such as Microsoft agreement
  • Positive: Saves money and time
  • Caution: None
  • Mandated: No
telecommunications
Telecommunications
  • One.Govt is a service that can take care of network services along with related capabilities
  • Delivered by: Dimension Data (single provider)
  • Positive: One stop shop for telecommunications
  • Negative: Cost and likely to be replaced (TaaS RFI) so future uncertain
  • Mandated: Yes (but shouldn’t be)
security
Security
  • A cluster of services that support increased security
  • Delivered by: multiple providers
  • Positive: Less of a need for RFP process
  • Negative: None
  • Mandated: Yes
cloud infrastructure as a service iaas
Cloud: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
  • Provides a virtualised environment along with disc storage that is similar to Cloud
  • Delivered by: IBM, Datacom, and Revera (Gen-I)
  • Positive: Cost (usually), provides foundation for wider Cloud adoption, flexibility, risk avoidance, pay for what you use
  • Negative: Cost compared to international (soon to be national) IaaS, short life (will be replaced by other Cloud services), not quite as flexible as international IaaS
  • Mandated: Yes
cloud desktop as a service daas
Cloud: Desktop as a Service (DaaS)
  • Delivers a virtual desktop based on your current organisation that can be accessed anywhere, anytime, securely, on any device, and includes wrapper services such as Service Desk
  • Delivered by: Datacom, Dimension Data, Fujistu, Telecom (Revera & Gen-I)
  • Positive: Allows for Mobile Worker and BYOD, pay for what you use, very cost competitive (even against international services)
  • Negative: None
  • Mandated: No
cloud office productivity opaas
Cloud: Office Productivity (OPaaS)
  • Is effectively Microsoft 365 for government including email, calendaring, and some other services
  • Delivered by: Datacom
  • Positive: Subsequent phases might deliver something of value
  • Negative: Too late, very difficult to deploy (integration), has been pipped at the post by Desktop as a Service
  • Mandated: No
web tools common web platform and common web services
Web Tools: Common Web Platform and Common Web Services
  • Provides a set of web platform and other web services
  • Delivered by: SilverStripe (platform), other services by multiple parties
  • Positive: Provides a comprehensive set of services for web
  • Negative: Single provider
  • Mandated: No
information management enterprise content management
Information Management: Enterprise Content Management
  • Enterprise content management service
  • Delivered by: Intergen, OpenText, TEAM Informatics
  • Positive: Three enterprise class ECMS to choose from
  • Negative: Did not include the one ECMS that is already implemented in a third of government, is very new (some teething issues)
  • Mandated: No
open data confirmation service
Open Data: Confirmation Service
  • Confirms customer identity data against passports, births and citizenship databases as well as a deaths check
  • Delivered by: Data Access Platform
  • Positive: Better identity management
  • Negative: None
  • Mandated: No
guidance on choosing common capabilities
Guidance on Choosing Common Capabilities
  • It is absolutely critical that you document and agree your requirements prior to engaging with Common Capabilities
    • Sector strategy
    • Business strategy
    • ICT strategy
    • Functional Requirements
    • Non-functional Requirements
    • Mandate to use
  • Talk to others who are in the process of deploying or have deployed for lessons learned
  • Integration and Service Management are critical
  • Establish Governance and Risk & Assurance Early (see DIA guidelines)
summary general opinion on common capabilities
Summary: General Opinion on Common Capabilities
  • Positive
    • Encourages agencies to work together collaboratively
    • Encourages agencies to keep technology up to date with appropriate investment
    • Some services (DaaS) are excellent
  • Negative
    • Mandates work negatively, we don’t like to be told what to do
    • The “product” approach is risky versus a guidance approach
    • The misconception that Common Capability can cater for everything (it can for 15% - 20%)
    • Some services are redundant already, or if not, will be soon
driver big data
Driver - Big Data
  • Big data is a blanket term for any collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand data management tools or traditional data processing applications. – Wikipedia
  • As we move to more of an online world (smart phones), the amount of data we capture increases exponentially
  • Our customers want to interact with us on a digital platform, not a face to face platform (it’s too slow)
  • The requirement then is that we collect increasing amounts of data that must be turned into real-time information that is accessible anytime, anywhere, on any device
driver open data
Driver - Open Data
  • Open Government Information and Data Work Programme (DIA):
    • make non-personal government-held data and information more widely available and discoverable, easily usable and compliant with open government data principles within the NZ legal context; and
    • facilitate agencies’ release of the non-personal government-held data and information that people, communities, and businesses want to use and re-use.
  • Data must be shared be default where it can be (privacy)
  • That data must be robust and always available
  • The requirement is then for us to make available (non-attributable) data anytime, anywhere, in a robust fashion for other’s to consume
driver smart sensing cities
Driver - Smart (sensing) Cities
  • Globally, residents are demanding Smart Cities driven by information that is extracted from the Flood of Data
  • The Internet of Things describes the new environment that will collect data and relay back information to residents
  • Local government is at the heart of this movement and must adapt to this new model or face irrelevance as it is built around them
  • It is not for local government to buy, build, or create these services, it is for local government to make data and information available to feed them while extracting value for future planning
  • Miramar Hackathon example
  • It’s here now
smart sensing cities examples
Smart (sensing) Cities - Examples
  • Sensors everywhere; personal smartphones, cars, buses, cameras, road side counters, water systems, air quality, sewage systems, weather, bicycles, taxis, and more
  • Real-time public transport (and taxi) information including arrival time, congestion, number of people on the service, and other information
  • Traffic management and analysis in order to decrease congestion and ease flows (Artificial Intelligence already operating in this area overseas)
  • Free wireless
  • Fault logging (and things like pothole management)
  • Artificial Intelligence controlled irrigation
  • Digital collaboration in all things controlled by the city including redefining the consultation process between local bodies and residents
recap what we know so far
Recap: What we know so far
  • We have access to a number of Common Capabilities that may or may not suit our purposes
  • We have a Flood of data coming at us today that will only increase as sensors
  • We have requirements from Government to make that data open where we can for others to reuse
  • Citizens demand increased information from us and digital interaction
the challenge
The Challenge
  • Local government is responsible for managing the data and resulting information to meet these requirements.
  • The Data Flood pours into local body at an increasing rate however, not all data needs to be kept. The value of data in this context is largely determined by time. The vast proportion only has value for minutes, if hours.
  • That data has to be processed into information, not necessarily by local government, and made available to the organisation (longer) and the world (shorter).
  • We must engage the ICT community to build the applications based on data and information we make available.
  • This requires a very strong strategy, discussion amongst local bodies, and then a plan to deliver.
common capabilities managing the data flood
Common Capabilities: Managing the Data Flood
  • We know that not all Common Capabilities will provide for all of our requirements, however, most will either:
    • Help us manage the Data Flood
    • Help us Open Data
    • Help us as an organisation
  • If we revisit the Common Capabilities with those in mind, we see a different view
licensing1
Licensing
  • Allows government to save money through bulk purchasing by joining contracts such as Microsoft agreement
  • This is about saving money, so is positive for the organisation itself, however as a strategy adds little value
telecommunications1
Telecommunications
  • One.Govt is a service that can take care of network services along with related capabilities
  • As the amount of data increases the network becomes more critical and more specialised
  • When we want our residents in interact with us digitally, we must ensure that the network is a very resilient, very supportable, very highly available services because otherwise we will lose their confidence and spend a large amount of money supporting it
  • As we move more to Mobile Worker, the network becomes increasingly important
security1
Security
  • A cluster of services that support increased security
  • Warning: Do not mistake security for privacy
  • Privacy is the set of requirements that the business has for data and information
  • Security is the set of tools that meet those requirements that are generally delivered by ICT
  • The Security Common Capability provides access to a very wide group of professionals who can help you
cloud infrastructure as a service iaas1
Cloud: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
  • Provides a virtualised environment along with disc storage that is similar to Cloud
  • As the growth of data is exponential, more and more storage is required
  • The IaaS service (whether Common Capability or delivered by a global Cloud Provider, i.e. Amazon) allows for you to grow that storage rapidly and pay for what you consume
  • The IaaS service allows for different tiers of storage at different costs. For example, information that must be delivered in real-time is stored on more expensive disc where archival data can be stored on slower disc
  • The IaaS can be made public so anyone can access the data (think DropBox on steroids)
  • Note: Datacom and Revera are in the process of bringing Amazon archival disc into their product set
cloud desktop as a service daas1
Cloud: Desktop as a Service (DaaS)
  • Delivers a virtual desktop based on your current organisation that can be accessed anywhere, anytime, securely, on any device, and includes wrapper services such as Service Desk
  • Allows you to unlock Mobile Worker and also BYOD
  • Allows you to give secure access to external customers
  • Provides the foundation, potentially, for Application Virtualisation (your own App Store)
cloud office productivity opaas1
Cloud: Office Productivity (OPaaS)
  • Is effectively Microsoft 365 for government including email, calendaring, and some other services
  • Has been effectively replaced by Desktop as a Service
  • Keep a watching brief, other services are planned in the future
web tools common web platform and common web services1
Web Tools: Common Web Platform and Common Web Services
  • Provides a set of web platform and other web services
  • Has clear value in an increasingly online world
information management enterprise content management1
Information Management: Enterprise Content Management
  • Enterprise content management service
  • Potentially ok for internal use, however, noting that data is becoming more open, you should check to see how services can scale. I.e. Can they deal with several thousand residents logging in to use it and what would that cost?
  • Consider other Software as a Service (SaaS) ECM’s for external use
open data confirmation service1
Open Data: Confirmation Service
  • Confirms customer identity data against passports, births and citizenship databases as well as a deaths check
  • Will have applications in the area of identity
final thoughts advice
Final Thoughts & Advice
  • The Data Flood is coming and local government will be at the forefront of it
  • Residents demand data be made open
  • Common Capabilities can be utilised as tools to support your wider strategy to manage this, however you will require supplemental tools to assist
  • Ignore the “mandate” – Either the service is of value to you, or it is not
  • Talk to others
  • Spend time with DIA to understand the service available
  • Setup the following email alerts on Google News:
    • Smart City
    • Internet of Things
questions
Questions
  • You can find me at:
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