Wireless strategies inc
Download
1 / 64

Wireless Strategies Inc. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 65 Views
  • Uploaded on

Wireless Strategies Inc. About Us. Wireless Strategies Inc. was formed as a Carriers Carrier by the founders of CCG Wireless LLP and MICROTEQ Corporation.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Wireless Strategies Inc.' - ulric


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

About us
About Us

  • Wireless Strategies Inc. was formed as a Carriers Carrier by the founders of CCG Wireless LLP and MICROTEQ Corporation.

    • CCG Wireless, part of Commercial Construction Group, LLC, builds and commissions fixed microwave and mobile base stations for major wireless carriers.

    • MICROTEQ Corporation provides Worldwide Business Development, Interim Management, and Consulting Services to the International Wireless Community


About us1
About Us

  • Wireless Strategies management team has over fifty years experience in the communications industry including:

Fixed Electronic Satellite Cellular

Microwave Warfare Communications


The problem
The Problem

Insufficient Spectrum


Wireless operator s view
Wireless Operator’s View

“A wireless operator without enough spectrum is like a body without enough blood… If you don't have enough blood you're going to face major medical challenges. Likewise, Wireless operators will need more spectrum to be able to offer new services and applications.”

-Ali Tabassi, Vice President Innovative Technologies, Sprint-Nextel

Wireless Strategies Inc.


Equipment manufacturer s view
Equipment Manufacturer’s View

In 2006, the CEO Council (CEOs from Motorola, Intel, IBM, HP, Dell etc.) called on the U.S. government to find more spectrum for use as new applications emerge.

Wireless Strategies Inc.


The problem1
The Problem

  • The amount of microwave spectrum is finite and has been assigned.

  • It takes many years for the FCC to go through the regulatory process of re-assigning spectrum (usually from Point-To-Point Fixed to Multipurpose, PTMP/Mobile).

Wireless Strategies Inc.


Solution
Solution

The Reuse

of

Existing Licensed Spectrum

by the

Licensed Operator

without causing

Additional Interference.

Wireless Strategies Inc.



Path coordination
Path Coordination

In a Perfect World there is only the Main Lobe,

and therefore only the Main Lobe has to be

considered



Path coordination1
Path Coordination

In the Real World there are Side Lobes and therefore the Side Lobes must be Concurrently Coordinated with the Main Lobe.


The status quo
The Status Quo

Paths designed for and operated with Legacy Equipment have not put the Antenna Side-Lobe Radiation to Productive Use.


The industry opportunity
The Industry Opportunity

Use Emerging (IEEE 802.16 – WiMAX – TDD – Smart Antenna) Technologies to Put the Antenna Side-Lobe Radiation to Productive Use Under Existing Rules without Causing Additional Interference.


Win win opportunity
Win-Win Opportunity

  • Wireless Carriers: New Customers, Higher Revenues, Higher Profits/Lower Costs and Shorter Service Provisioning Times

  • Spectrum Managers: Increase in Prior Coordinations and Monitoring Services, Increased Revenues and Profits

  • FCC: Supports the Commission’s goal of Maximizing the Effective use of Spectrum.

  • Public Interest: More Competition for their Business, More Features and Lower prices



Legacy Example (6GHz)

  • One Freq Pair

  • One Path

  • Reqd Capacity 134Mbps

  • Min Reqd Load 67Mbps

  • One Major Subscriber

  • Operating Load 89Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $6,000

  • Mo PBT $600




Concurrently Coordinated Example (6GHz)

  • One Freq Pair

  • Six paths

  • Reqd Capacity 134Mbps

  • Min Reqd Load 67Mbps

  • One Major Subscriber

  • Five Minor Subscribers

  • Actual Load 134Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $14,400

  • Mo PBT $8,600


Compelling Business Case

  • Legacy

  • One Freq Pair

  • One Path

  • One Major Subscriber

  • No Minor Subscribers

  • Traffic Load 89Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $6,000

  • Mo PBT $600

  • Concurrent Coordination

  • One Freq Pair

  • Six Paths

  • One Major Subscriber

  • Five Minor Subscribers

  • Traffic Load 134Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $14,400

  • Mo PBT $8,600


Compelling Business Case

  • Legacy

  • One Freq Pair

  • One Path

  • One Major Subscriber

  • No Minor Subscribers

  • Traffic Load 89Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $6,000

  • Mo PBT $600

  • Concurrent Coordination

  • One Freq Pair

  • Six Paths

  • One Major Subscriber

  • Five Minor Subscribers

  • Traffic Load 134Mbps

  • Mo Rev. $14,400

  • Mo PBT $8,600

How do

WE

Get from

Here to There


Innovation
Innovation

The FCC has consistently promoted the national policy set forth in Section 257 of the Communications Act by enabling industry operators and equipment providers to maximize the efficient use of spectrum and facilitate innovative services and product offerings.


Facilitating innovation
Facilitating Innovation

The Commission’s Rules specify the technical requirements (not how the technical requirements are met)


Regulations specify
Regulations Specify

  • The Shape and Size of the Radiation Pattern Envelope (Tx power x antenna gain) and the location from which it emanates.

  • They do NOT specify HOW* it is achieved (TWTA, SSA with a Parabolic dish with a dipole, a Flat Panel, or a Multi-Array, etc).

    *By not specifying HOW, the Commission allows and

    encourages industry to innovate.


Microwave transmission reception system
Microwave Transmission/Reception System

A Microwave Transmission/Reception System Consists of two pieces:

  • A Signal Generator/Receiver (Transceiver)

  • An Antenna consisting of two pieces

    • i. Primary Element - determines the RPE

    • ii. Microwave radiator(s) such as a dipole or horn, etc.


T/R

T/R

Transceiver Regulations

  • Do not specify physical dimensions

  • Do not specify where the Transceiver(s) are located


Antenna regulations
Antenna Regulations

  • Do not specify physical dimensions

  • Do not specify the type of Antenna or where the Microwave Radiator Element(s) are located

  • Do not specify the RPE of the Radiating Element(s)

    -By not specifying HOW, the Commission allows and

    encourages industry to innovate.


Part 101-115 of the Rules

Antenna Radiating Elements Not Specified

Feed Horn with Convex Reflector

Physical Location Not Specified

RPE Not Specified

Dipole

RPE Not Specified

Physical Location Not Specified




Transceiver and radiator element s location and rpe not specified for a dish antenna
Transceiver and Radiator Element’s Location and RPE Not Specified for a Dish Antenna


Transceiver and radiator element s location and rpe not specified for a multi array antenna
Transceiver and Radiator Element’s Location and RPE Not Specified for a Multi-Array Antenna


Transceiver and radiator element s location and rpe not specified for a multi array antenna1
Transceiver and Radiator Element’s Location and RPE Not Specified for a Multi-Array Antenna


Transceiver and radiator element s location and rpe not specified

T/R

Transceiver and Radiator Element’s Location and RPE Not Specified

RPE Not Specified

Dipole

Physical Location Not Specified


50dBm

70dBm

10dBm

30dBm

The Regulation

EIRP (Std A)

Stand alone Radiation Element EIRP Tx Po 30dBm, Dipole Gain 2dBi


20dBi

40dBi

-20dBi

0dBi

The Regulation

RPE


Antenna system regulations
Antenna System Regulations

The location and radiation pattern of an antenna system’s radiator(s) has never been specified and has never been a cause of concern, because it is the level of Interfering signal “I” arriving at the victim receiver from the interfering system in its totality that is used for coordination interference calculations, C/I and T/I

(This applies to any type of antenna system and path)


Prior Coordination Boundary

Existing Path

Site B

Site A

Carrier C

C/I or T/I

Interference I

Site D

Site C

Proposed Path


50dBm

70dBm

10dBm

30dBm

Log Polar Plot of the RPE of a Std A Requirement

for Any Type of Antenna Around Site C in dBm

Tx Po 30dBm


Linear Distance Plot of the Interference Contour Around Site C

for Any Type of Std A Antenna

(For a given Victim receiver antenna gain)


Victim Antenna Main Lobe 10 deg off Site C Antenna Ctr Line C

Victim Antenna Main Lobe 20 deg off Site C Antenna Ctr Line

Victim Antenna Main Lobe

40 deg off Site C

Antenna Ctr Line

Victim Antenna Back Lobe

Prior Coordination Boundary 125 miles Except within 5 deg of Ant Ctr line when it is 250 miles


Legacy network
Legacy Network C

Everything Required

to perform a

Coordination Study is known


Linear Distance Plot of the Interference Contour Around Site C

for a Std A Parabolic Dish Antenna

(For a given Victim receiver antenna gain)


Std A Parabolic Dish C

Prior Coordination Boundary

Existing Path

Site B

Site A

Carrier C

C/I or T/I

Interference I

Site D

Site C

Proposed Path

Interference Contour I

(For a given Victim Rx Ant Gain)


Smart antenna with distributed radiators
Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators C

  • A smart antenna with distributed radiators is an antenna system that combines an antenna array with a digital-processing capability to transmit in an adaptive spatially sensitive manner so as to always maintain the Interference at the Victim receiver(s) input from any Distributed Radiating Element ( IDRE ) less than the coordinating Interference ( I ).

    Therefore, the interference signal IDRE is not a cause of concern because it is the level of Interfering signal I that is dominating the coordination interference calculations, C/I and T/I .


Concurrently coordinated network
Concurrently Coordinated Network C

Everything Required

to perform a

Coordination Study

and to

Maintain IDRE < I

is known


Linear Distance Plot of the Interference Contour Around Site C

for a Std A Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators

(For a given Victim receiver antenna gain)


Std A Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators C

Prior Coordination Boundary

Existing Path

Site B

Site A

Carrier C

C/I or T/I

Interference I

Site D

Site C

Proposed Path

Interference Contour I

(For a given Victim Rx Ant Gain)


Network comparison
Network Comparison C

Std A Parabolic Dish Antenna

and

Std A Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators


Linear Distance Plot of the Interference Contour Around Site C

for a Std A Parabolic Dish Antenna

(For a given Victim receiver antenna gain)


Linear Distance Plot of the Interference Contour Around Site C

for a Std A Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators

(For a given Victim receiver antenna gain)


Std A Parabolic Dish C

Prior Coordination Boundary

Existing Path

Site B

Site A

Carrier C

C/I or T/I

Interference I

Site D

Site C

Proposed Path

Interference Contour I

(For a given Victim Rx Ant Gain)


Std A Smart Antenna with Distributed Radiators C

Prior Coordination Boundary

Existing Path

Site B

Site A

Carrier C

C/I or T/I

Interference I

Site D

Site C

Proposed Path

Interference Contour I

(For a given Victim Rx Ant Gain)


Regulations and procedures
Regulations and Procedures C

  • All FCC regulations and procedures are in place.

  • A licensee must comply with all regulations and follow all required procedures.

  • New license applicants have all the information necessary to conduct a prior coordination.

  • The Smart Antenna’s data base can be maintained by the licensee or out sourced to a coordination representative.


Concurrent coordination a win win opportunity
Concurrent Coordination C a Win–Win Opportunity


Win win opportunity1
Win-Win Opportunity C

  • Wireless Carriers:

    • New Customers, Higher Revenues, Higher Profits/Lower Costs and Shorter Service Provisioning Times


Win win opportunity2
Win-Win Opportunity C

  • Spectrum Managers:

    • Increased Revenues and Profit from:

      • License amendments to take advantage of the increase in traffic revenue and profits from the deployment of emerging technologies.

      • New license applications as emerging technologies make more markets available.

      • Monitoring and data base Live Update Services.


Win win opportunity3
Win-Win Opportunity C

  • FCC:

    By supporting the Commission’s goal:

    “Maximizing the effective use of spectrum by allowing more point-to-point use of the same spectrum in a given area without causing additional interference.


Win win opportunity4
Win-Win Opportunity C

  • Public Interest:

    • More competition for their Business, More Features and Lower prices


I C DRE< I

CSL> T

CDRE> T


ad