Danida support to iwrm south africa
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Danida support to IWRM– South Africa. From policy to Implementation. water & forestry. provincial & local government. IWRM I. Guidelines and policy Water Conservation, CMAs and Groundwater Limited capacity building Limited developmental projects.

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Danida support to IWRM– South Africa

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Danida support to iwrm south africa

Danida support to IWRM– South Africa

From policy to Implementation

water & forestry

provincial &

local government


Iwrm i

IWRM I

  • Guidelines and policy

  • Water Conservation, CMAs and Groundwater

  • Limited capacity building

  • Limited developmental projects


Difference between participation and empowerment

Difference between participation and empowerment

  • Empowerment is the expansion of assets and capabilities of poor people to participate in, negotiate with, influence, control, and hold accountable institutions that affect their lives

    (Narayan, Deepa (Ed,) Empowerment and Poverty Reduction A Sourcebook The World Bank, Washington, 2002, p.xviii).


Difference between participation and empowerment1

Difference between participation and empowerment

  • If we are to capacitate people to be able to claim their rights, we have to ensure that approaches adopted to achieve these outcomes are effective, appropriate for their situation and allow sufficient time for the capacity development of marginalized groups and their representatives to be able to articulate their needs


The rights based approach rba to development

The Rights-Based Approach (RBA) to Development

  • The rights-based approach to development sets the achievement of human rights as the objective of development. It uses thinking about human rights as the scaffolding of development policy. It invokes the international apparatus of human rights accountability in support of development action. In all of these, it is concerned not just with civil and political rights, but also with economic, social and cultural rights

    (Overseas Development Institute (ODI) 1998),


The rights based approach rba empowerment

The Rights-Based Approach (RBA) - Empowerment

  • Human rights is empowering. It has the potential to empower people at the grass roots level into believing that they have a right to education, to health care or any of the other rights proclaimed in international instruments

    (Human Rights Council of Australia- 1998)


The rights based approach rba accountability

The Rights-Based Approach (RBA) -Accountability

  • Accountability is firmly anchored in the human rights based approach to development. All partners in the development process: local, national, regional and international must accept higher levels of accountability.

  • Not only does it establish claims but also establishes obligations to meet these claims and identifies the corresponding duty-bearers.

    (UN Commission of Human Rights – Poverty Reduction Guidelines)


The rights based approach rba participation

The Rights-Based Approach (RBA) - Participation

  • Popular participation must extend to all parts of community life, including the definition and formulation of development policies and programmes, as well as their international implementation, monitoring and supervision

    (Declaration by UN Working Group on the Right to Development – UN Commission of Human Rights - 1996)


Rationale for approach to iwrm south africa

Rationale for approach to IWRM South Africa


Key components of support

Key Components of Support

  • Building Stakeholder Commitment

  • Institutionalising CMAs

  • Integrating IWRM into service delivery

  • Link to each outcome mapped out in Masibambane III


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Provincial

Boundaries

Water Management

Area Boundaries

CMAs and IWRM WMA

ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

2.

BOTSWANA

1.

4.

3.

5.

Pretoria

WATER MANAGEMENT AREA

Johannesburg

10.

NAMIBIA

1.

LIMPOPO

2.

LUVUVHU AND LETABA

8.

9.

6.

3.

CROCODILE (WEST) AND

MARICO

4.

OLIFANTS

7.

5.

INKOMATI

6.

USUTHU TO MHLATUZE

Bloemfontein

7.

THUKELA

13.

14.

Durban

11.

8.

UPPER VAAL

9.

MIDDLE VAAL

10.

LOWER VAAL

11.

MVOTI TO UMZIMKULU

12.

MZIMVUBU TO KEISKAMMA

17.

12.

13.

UPPER ORANGE

14.

LOWER ORANGE

15.

15.

FISH TO TSITSIKAMMA

16.

East London

GOURITZ

19.

16.

17.

OLIFANTS/DOORN

18.

BREEDE

Cape

Port Elizabeth

18.

19.

BERG

Town


Key issues sector wide approach

Key issues Sector Wide Approach

  • Need to move to SWAP

    • Integration within DWAF

    • Whilst DWAF is sector leader needs strong linkages with other government departments

    • Vehicles such as Masibambane critical


Danida support to iwrm south africa

CMAs

  • Need to ensure that basin organisations (CMAs) do not maintain the status quo but are vehicles for IWRM and sustainable development in the holistic sense

  • Moreover CMAs are a vehicle for redressing the past and those previously marginalised can benefit to the maximum and actively participate in local WRM issues.


Inter governmental

Inter-governmental

  • Considerable effort has been taken to engage other government departments

  • Creating fora for dialogue

  • At an operational level

    • Bring all key actors on board wherever possible with respect to pilot/demonstration projects to ensure integrated approaches and linkages to local and provincial development plans (e.g. KZN)

    • Use of Metro to capacitate other municipalities


Other donors and ngos

Other donors and NGOs

  • Task has been to ensure complementarity's and avoid duplication

  • Involve donors in key milestone activities

  • Draw on their experiences e.g. FAO and food security ITC/ILO gender

  • Ensuring real collaboration on the ground e.g. UK/EPA, Netherlands, USAID

  • Partnering funding


Other donors and ngos1

Other donors and NGOs

  • EXAMPLES 1

    • EU Water for Development Programme

    • Netherlands capacity develop for rural communities

    • USAID Community involvement in non-revenue management

    • UK/EPA developing stakeholder partnerships for CMAs


Other donors and ngos2

Other donors and NGOs

  • EXAMPLES 2

    • Netherlands: Water Boards

    • FAO: Food Security

    • ITC/ILO Flemish Community GPE

    • WWF Partnership capacity building WUAs

    • DFID licensing


Iwrm ii

IWRM II

Empowerment Projects

Selected Examples


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Others being

identified

with DIR WUE

Others being

identified

with DIR WUE

Sandveld

Strand 1

LG and/or

DWAF

Transformation

Irrigation

Boards

Others being

identified

with DIR WUE

Crocodile West-Marico

Water Harvesting?

Mvoti Umzimkulu

Olifants Doorn


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Communities &

Non-revenue

management

Food security

& HIV/AIDS

Strand 2

Metros

The

“Three Metros”

Resource

pollution

Integrated

Agriculture

demo

Urban agri

Impact on

resource

Mvoti Umzimkulu

(Ethekwini)

Crocodile West-Marico


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Groundwater

Protection

WC/DM

Awareness

Organic

baby food

women’s

cooperative

Emerging

Farmers

Wetlands

Rehab & Food

Food security

Strand 3

Communities

Food security

“mini” CMS

Pollution

Mvoti Umzimkulu

Olifants Doorn


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Sustainable Water-wise Food Garden

Doringbaai Multipurpose Centre

Food Security

Capacity Building & Training

Semi-commercial scale


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Big Roof Project - Bitterfontein

Rainwater harvesting

Food Security


Danida support to iwrm south africa

II

Organic Rooibos Tea Nursery & Baby Food

Breevlei Landbou Wupperthal

Job creation through agriculture (organic rooibos tea & vegetables)

Develop additional land

Improve food security


Danida support to iwrm south africa

II

Petersfield Youth Emerging Farmers

PetersfieldCitrusdal

Job creation through agriculture (organic vegetables)

Purchase additional

land & water

Improve food security


Danida support to iwrm south africa

II

Swartruggens Ceres Karoo Groundwater Protection & Climate Change Monitoring

Groundwater

monitoring

& spring

protection

Climate change

monitoring

Safer drinking water

In deep rural areas


Iwrm south africa

IWRM South Africa

Challenges


Challenges

Challenges

  • Embedding concept of budget support

  • Synchronising of budgets especially when more than one government department involved

  • Allowing sufficient time for empowerment

  • Balance between strategic and on the ground projects


Risks

Risks

  • Human resources

  • Donor budget support not achieving what intended to

  • Continued marginalisation of vulnerable groups

  • WMA dynamics skewed and approaches differ


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Delivering Transformation and Sustainable Development through IWRM - (1)

Top down &

bottom up

Making it

happen

Learning &

adaptation

Water

for all

- access to basic

water services - multiple

use services - meet

Millennium Devt

goals

Resilient

catchments

- protecting water

resources under climate

chaos: resilience &

whole catchment

planning

Water

for industry

- moving towards

sustainable production

in the energy, forestry

& commercial

farming sectors

Water for

emerging

black farmers

- water is vital to the

second economy and

empowerment

of HDIs

Healthy

catchments

- protecting the

source of our water:

ecological services &

whole catchment

planning


Danida support to iwrm south africa

Energy

security

Water

security

Food

security

Climate

security

Second

economy

- sustainable

livelihoods &

empowerment

Second

economy

- handouts

& dependency

Delivering Transformation and Sustainable Development through IWRM - (2)

First

economy

Unsustainable

production

in the energy, forestry

& commercial

farming sectors

First

economy

Sustainable (resource

efficient) production

in the energy, forestry

& commercial

farming sectors

Transform

Transform


Way forward

Way Forward

  • Share our approach – influence yours ( SWAP)

  • Learn from Masibambane / Sector

  • Multiplier effect

  • More holisitic approach to IWRM and water for growth and development


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