Usfs national minimum protocol for monitoring solitude
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USFS National Minimum Protocol for Monitoring Solitude. June 5, 2014 Dr. Troy E. Hall WIMST Oregon State University t [email protected] Overview of the webinar. Photo: Troy Hall. Why monitor opportunities for solitude Element 5 of the Challenge The national minimum protocol Q&A.

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USFS National Minimum Protocol for Monitoring Solitude

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Usfs national minimum protocol for monitoring solitude

USFS National Minimum Protocol for Monitoring Solitude

June 5, 2014

Dr. Troy E. Hall

WIMST

Oregon State University

[email protected]


Overview of the webinar

Overview of the webinar

Photo: Troy Hall

  • Why monitor opportunities for solitude

  • Element 5 of the Challenge

  • The national minimum protocol

  • Q&A


Why monitor solitude

Why monitor solitude

Photo: cfot.ca

Wilderness Act: “outstanding opportunities for solitude or a primitive & unconfined type of recreation”


Wilderness solitude

Wilderness & Solitude

Photo: Troy Hall

Wilderness character

The only land designation where solitude is mandated


Wilderness solitude1

Wilderness & Solitude

Troy Hall

Tom Iraci

Opportunities may be compromised


10ywsc

10YWSC

Photo: Wilderness.net

All wildernesses managed to a minimum stewardship level by 2014

10 elements, each worth 10 points

Target: 60 points


Element 5

Element 5

Photo: Tom Kaffine

“This wilderness has adequate direction, monitoring, and management actions to protect opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined recreation.”


Scoring for element 5

Scoring for Element 5


Why create a national protocol

Why create a national protocol?

Photos: Brad Johnson

Challenge making progress on Element 5

Inherent difficulties monitoring for solitude


Assumptions

Assumptions

Photo: Wilderness Watch

This does not address primitive & unconfined recreation

“number of encounters” is the most appropriate indicator for solitude

This is a minimum protocol


Scoring with the minimum protocol

Scoring with the minimum protocol

Photo: Maria Burke

4 points = data complete (collected & summarized) for each monitoring area

Data ≤ 10 years old (recommend 5 years)

Indicators and standards need not be formally presented in planning documents


What s in the protocol

What’s in the protocol?

Photo: Troy Hall

Photo: Marty Almquist

Establishing use zones

Selecting monitoring areas

Scheduling data collection

Collecting encounter data

Basic analysis


Step 1 pre work

Step 1: Pre-work

NPS photo

  • Existing indicators & standards?

    • E.g., “80% of the time a visitor will encounter 10 or fewer groups per day”

    • E.g., “There shall be no more than one campsite visible or audible from any campsite, or closer than 500 feet in open country”

    • Previous data?


Step 1 pre work1

Step 1: Pre-work

Existing WROS zones?


Step 1 pre work2

Step 1: Pre-work

Photo: Jay Robinson

  • Establishing Use Zones

    • 2-4 categories

      • High, moderate, low

      • Most wilderness is “low use” -- <10% of all visitation

      • Monitoring is not required in low use zones


Step 1 pre work3

Step 1: Pre-work

Photo: Steve Boutcher

Photo: wilderness.net

  • Establishing Use Zones

    • Mapping considerations

      • Reasonable size

      • Logical traffic patterns

      • Other management concerns


Step 2 select monitoring areas

Step 2: Select monitoring areas

Photo: Troy Hall

What is a monitoring area?


Step 2 select monitoring areas1

Step 2: Select monitoring areas

  • What “type” of wilderness?

    • Type 1:

      • “High” or “Medium” use wildernesses with > 75 miles of travel corridor

      • “Low” use wildernesses with > 100 miles of travel corridor.

    • Type 2:

      • “High” or “Medium” use wildernesses with 1-75 miles of travel corridor

      • “Low” use wildernesses with 1-100 miles of travel corridor.

    • Type 3:

      • Wildernesses with no miles of travel corridor.


Step 2 select monitoring areas2

Step 2: Select monitoring areas

Photo: G. Wuerthner

  • How many monitoring areas?

    • Type I wildernesses:

      • 2 locations within each use class, except low use

    • Type II wildernesses:

      • 1 location within each use class, except low use


Step 2 select monitoring areas3

Step 2: Select monitoring areas

NPS Photo

Photo: Troy Hall

  • How do you choose?

    • Representative area?

    • Canary in the coal mine?

    • Known problem areas?


Usfs national minimum protocol for monitoring solitude

The decision about which monitoring areas to choose is a judgment call. Therefore, each wilderness could have a different approach to selecting monitoring areas.

Photo: Wilderness.net


Step 3 sampling

Step 3: Sampling

Photo: Mike Carr, Gila NF

  • Sampling

    • 5 weekdays & 5 weekend/holiday for each monitoring area, during high use season

    • 4 hours per monitoring session – daytime hours for traveling encounters

    • Convenience vs. random sampling


Step 4 collect data

Step 4: Collect data

Photo: wilderness.net

Photo: Chris Barns

  • Traveling encounters

    • people you see and/or hear while traveling in the monitoring area


Step 4 collect data1

Step 4: Collect data

Photo: Cathy Curby

Photo: Troy Hall

  • Camp encounters

    • number of other camping groups visible or audible from each occupied campsite


Step 4 collect data2

Step 4: Collect data

  • What’s an encounter?

    • Inside or outside wilderness?

    • On/off trail?

    • Close vs. distant?

    • Multiple sightings?


Step 4 collect data3

Step 4: Collect data


Step 4 collect data4

Step 4: Collect data


Step 4 collect data5

Step 4: Collect data

Photo: Bob Wick

  • Supplementary information

    • Visitor characteristics

    • Traffic counters


Step 5 data management

Step 5: Data Management


Step 5 data management1

Step 5: Data Management


Step 5 data management2

Step 5: Data Management


Step 5 data management3

Step 5: Data Management


Available materials

Available materials

Photo: Brad Eells

  • Protocol

    • Definitions and procedures

    • Guidance for establishing use zones

    • “checksheet”

    • FAQs


Available materials1

Available materials

  • See also wilderness.net

    • Toolboxes  visitor use management  monitoring


Usfs national minimum protocol for monitoring solitude

FAQs

Photo: A. Halford

Why not use trail counters or permits?

What if we have an existing protocol?

What can Type III wildernesses do?


Usfs national minimum protocol for monitoring solitude

FAQs

Photo: Michael Lusk

How does this fit with Wilderness Character Monitoring and wilderness performance measure?


Important caveats

Important caveats

Photo: wilderness.net

Photo: Cathy Curby

Protocol works for most but not all wildernesses

Not adequate for monitoring trends


A tip of the hat to

A tip of the hat to…

  • TJ Broom

  • WIMST, especially

    • ToganCapozza

    • Kimberly Schlenker

    • Chad Grossenberg

    • Tim Eling

    • Steve Boutcher


Questions discussion

Questions & Discussion

  • Contact Troy:

    • [email protected]

  • Contact Steve:

    • [email protected]


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