Career Profile Inventory

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Envisia Learning is a provider and developer of innovative, high-quality people and process solutions for consultants and business professionals working with individuals, teams and organizations.Envisia provides a variety of customized and off-the-shelf products in the areas of 360-degree feedback; personality, career and stress assessments; survey solutions and online performance management systems..

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Career Profile Inventory

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1. Career Profile Inventory Administration and Interpretation

2. Envisia Learning is a provider and developer of innovative, high-quality people and process solutions for consultants and business professionals working with individuals, teams and organizations. Envisia provides a variety of customized and off-the-shelf products in the areas of 360-degree feedback; personality, career and stress assessments; survey solutions and online performance management systems. Envisia Learning

3. Balancing Individual & Organizational Needs

4. Pre-employment personnel selection systems to optimize employee satisfaction and productivity Identification of “high potentials” and a talent management pipeline at all job levels A talent management system emphasizing employee development Proper alignment of employee’s skills, abilities, interests, and experiences with current and future job openings Retention of talent and reduction of voluntary turnover Organizational Career Management Issues

5. The 2000 Retention Practices Survey (SHRM) reported an average 17% annual voluntary quit rate across 473 organizations (highest was 44.9% in hospitality and lowest was 14.9% in manufacturing) Cost of recruiting and training new leaders (supervisors and managers) is approximately 90-150% of the employee’s salary US Department of Labor estimates that it costs an organization approximately one-third of a new hire’s annual salary to replace a non-exempt employee Retention Costs

6. A recent McKinsey study of 13,000 executives at more than 120 companies and case studies of 27 leading companies, revealed compelling evidence that better talent management leads to increased performance On average, companies that did a better job of attracting, developing, and retaining highly talented managers earned 22 percentage points higher return to shareholders Michels, E., Habdfield-Jones, H & Axlerod, B. (2001). The War for Talent. Harvard Business Press. Retention Factors

7. Gallup's Employee Engagement Index reveals that, on average, about 70 percent of U.S. workers are not engaged in or are actively disengaged from their work. A recent Towers Perrin multi-company survey revealed that only half (50 percent) of employees polled said their company inspires them to do their best work, suggesting companies are performing below their potential because they are not engaging employees Retention Factors

8. Results of two company wide employee engagement surveys were analyzed for all corporate staff for a large food service corporation for 2002 and 2004 Employees rated their own involvement with their organization and job using a benchmarked 12-item Employee Engagement Index (alpha .91) Employees were asked additional questions about retention (intention to leave in 12 months), job satisfaction and perceptions of job stress Nowack, K. (2005). Employee Engagement Matters: Relationship between Employee Engagement, Retention, Job Satisfaction and Stress Employee Engagement Study

9. Employee Engagement Study (N=163) Significant Differences (all p’s < .01)

10. Hold managers accountable for talent management including tying retention and developmental coaching to performance reviews Train leaders on retention and development strategies so they can build a retention culture in their own units Implement strategic talent development programs including coaching, 360 degree feedback and assessment centers to identify high potential leadership talent Institute formalized mentoring and career assessment and development programs Building A Retention Culture

11. OLD PARADIGMS Job Security Longitudinal Career Paths Job/Person Fit Organizational Loyalty Career Success Academic Degree Position/Title Full-Time Employment Retirement Single Jobs/Careers Change in jobs based on fear Promotion highly tenure based NEW PARADIGMS Employability Security Alternate Career Paths Person/Organization Fit Job/Task Loyalty Work/Family Balance Continuous Relearning Competencies/Development Contract Employment Career Sabbaticals Multiple Jobs/Careers Change in jobs based on growth Promotion highly performance based Workforce 2010: The Changing Career Paradigms

12. 2005 Retention Driver Survey

13. The overall set of expectations held by an individual with respect to what he or she will contribute to the organization and what the organization will provide in return. The Psychological Contract

14. Career Counseling Executive/Management Coaching Supervisory Training Management Development Career Resource Centers Assessment Centers Outplacement Uses of the Career Profile Inventory

15. Career Profile Inventory Online Administration

16. Career Stage Career Path Preference Political Style Orientation Career Profile Inventory Summary of Scales

17. STEP 1 INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT STEP 2 INTERPERSONAL ASSESSMENT STEP 3 ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT STEP 4 ACTION PLANNING Who am I? (Career Stage, Path Preference, Political Style) How do other see me? (Self-insight, image, political style, personality) What are my options within the organization? (Knowledge of the organization, future trends, options, opportunities) How do I achieve my goals? (Motivation, confidence, goal setting, action planning) Career Management Process

18. Combinations of Career Interests & Skills

19. Initial pilot study established on 161 employed adults in 1990; Second item/scale analysis in 2002 (N=133) Composed of 30% male and 70% female; 71.5% Caucasian, 11.5% Hispanic, 5.5% African American, 5.5% Asian, and 6% Other Average age was 35.6 (S.D. =7.23) Sample was highly educated (50% possessed a Bachelor’s degree, 19.3% a Masters, and 6% a Doctorate) The employees came from over 14 diverse industries in both the public and private sectors Career Profile Inventory Pilot Research Study

20. ALPHA CURRENT FUTURE Career Stage Mean SD Mean SD Entry .71 5.86 2.2 5.63 2.2 Development .64 7.04 1.7 7.49 1.7 Balance .68 5.28 1.9 6.96 2.0 Exploration .80 5.47 2.7 4.59 2.3 Career Path Preference Managerial .60 9.29 2.7 9.68 2.9 Specialist .64 8.61 2.5 9.30 2.7 Generalist .67 9.62 2.7 11.30 2.7 Entrepreneurial .58 8.59 2.4 9.86 2.7 Political Style Promoter .71 17.03 4.1 13.89 4.1 Strategist .63 17.67 2.9 17.22 3.9 Team Player .73 15.89 3.8 18.91 3.5 Independent .63 13.47 3.4 15.43 3.9 Career Profile Inventory Pilot Research Study Norms (N=133)

21. CAREER STAGE CORRELATIONS (*p < .01) 1 2 3 4 1. Entry __ .18 -.11 .09 2. Development __ .02 -.23* 3. Balance __ .02 4. Exploration __ Career Profile Inventory Scale Correlations

22. CAREER PATH CORRELATIONS (*p < .01) 1 2 3 4 1. Managerial __ .48* -.09 .06 2. Generalist __ .08 .19* 3. Specialist __ .49* 4. Entrepreneurial __ Career Profile Inventory Scale Correlations

23. POLITICAL STYLE CORRELATIONS (* p < .01) 1 2 3 4 1. Independent __ .40* .02 -.18* 2. Team Player __ .32* -.22* 3. Strategist __ -.23* 4. Promoter __ Career Profile Inventory Scale Correlations

24. Correlations Between Preferred Political Style and Preferred Career Path Preferences (*p < .01) Preferred Political Style Orientation Preferred Path Promoter Strategist Team Independent Player Player Managerial .31* .34* .02 -.01 Generalist .26* .35* .26* .16 Specialist .08 .13 .21* .42* Entrepreneurial .15 .21* .19* .30* Career Profile Inventory Scale Correlations

25. ENTRY DEVELOPMENT BALANCED EXPLORATION Career Profile Inventory Career Stage Scale

26. Career Profile Inventory Stages of Career Development

27. This stage is characterized as the beginning of one's career (or new career), initial placement, the early process of "learning the ropes," figuring out what is expected from others in the organization and developing basic knowledge, skills and abilities. It The major developmental theme associated with the entry career stage might be conceptualized as “self-validation” of an individual’s skills, abilities, and potential. Career Profile Inventory Career Stage: Entry

28. This stage is characterized by being accepted into the organization, being promoted and receiving increasingly more challenging assignments and responsibilities. The major developmental theme associated with the development career stage might be conceptualized as “self-improvement” of an individual’s skills, abilities, and potential. Career Profile Inventory Career Stage: Development

29. This stage is characterized by self-satisfaction with previous organizational efforts and accomplishments, a re-assessment of career/life goals and developing a greater balance between work, family, children, recreation, leisure The major developmental theme associated with the balance career stage might be conceptualized as “self-fulfillment” with an individual’s work/family activities, experiences and accomplishments. Career Profile Inventory Career Stage: Balanced

30. This stage is characterized by feelings of lack of mobility, options, choices or “fit” regarding one’s position, or career advancement (upward, laterally, or downward). The major developmental theme associated with the exploration career stage might be conceptualized as active “self-exploration” and redefining of career options and opportunities where an individual can be successfully challenged, stimulated and continue to develop personally and professionally. Career Profile Inventory Career Stage: Exploration

31. DISENGAGEMENT: Depressed aspirations, low organizational commitment, non-responsibility CONSERVATIVE RESISTANCE: Chronic negativity/criticism, lack of initiative, low risk taking, territoriality Behaviors of Employees in the Exploration/Trapped Career Stage

32. Career Plateau Situation in which for either organizational or personal reasons the probability of moving up the career ladder is low. Types of Plateaus Structural plateau: end of advancement Content plateau: lack of challenge Life plateau: crisis of personal identity Career Profile Inventory The “Plateau-ing” Trap

33. Berlew, D. & Hall, D. (1966). The socialization of managers. Administrative Science Quarterly, 2, 207-223 Dalton, G. & Thompson, P. (1977). The four stages of professional careers. Organizational Dynamics, 19-42 Erickson, E. (1959). Identity and the life cycle. Psychological Issues, New York: International Universities. Hall, D. (1975). Pressures from work, self, and home in the life stages of married women. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 6, 121-132. Hall, D. (1976). Careers in organizations. Santa Monica, CA: Goodyear Publishing. Levinson, D. et al. (1974). The psychological development of men in early adulthood and the mid-life transition. In D.F. Hicks, A. Thomas, & M. Roff (eds.), Life history research in psychopathology. Vol. 3, Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press. Schein, E. (1971). The individual, the organization, and the career: A conceptual scheme. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 7, 401-426. Super, D. & Bohn, M. (1970). Occupational psychology. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing. Super, D. et al. (1957). Vocational development: A framework for research. New York: Teachers College Press, pp. 40-41. Career Stage Theory Selected References

34. Career Profile Inventory Career Path Preferences Results

35. MANAGERIAL GENERALIST SPECIALIST ENTREPRENEURIAL Career Profile Inventory Career Path Preferences

36. Traditional vertical movement with increasing levels of authority & responsibility in a managerial path Decreasing opportunities for upward mobility in most upward mobility & career movement organizations Organizational reward systems support upward mobility & career movement Career Profile Inventory Managerial Career Path

37. TYPICAL MOTIVES Power Influence Control Managerial Competence Leadership Achievement TYPICAL REWARDS Promotion Increased Authority Increased Span of Promotion Control Executive Perks (e.g., stock options) Titles Managerial Career Path Typical Motives & Rewards

38. Job change/rotation Special projects and assignments Exposure and involvement in key business challenges Task forces, committees, change initiatives How Do You Develop Leaders? OH# 25 There’s now solid research on how best to develop people (e.g. CCL) and we’d like you to consider this research when preparing your draft development plan. Briefly, the highest potential to learn is from experiences you have here at Amgen and targeted activities outside of work such as community, religious or school involvement. The next most impactful way to learn is through feedback experiences such as this 360 degree process and coaching or mentoring opportunities. Finally, the old standby, classroom training can be useful in certain instances such as when you start a new job and need to quickly “download” a lot of skills and knowledge on a certain topic. This research is important to remember when you’re preparing your own development plan AND when you coach people on your staff. [Facilitators: Review this and then you may want to ask participants for a few examples of what they have done for themselves or others that have been powerful development initiatives.] OH# 25 There’s now solid research on how best to develop people (e.g. CCL) and we’d like you to consider this research when preparing your draft development plan. Briefly, the highest potential to learn is from experiences you have here at Amgen and targeted activities outside of work such as community, religious or school involvement. The next most impactful way to learn is through feedback experiences such as this 360 degree process and coaching or mentoring opportunities. Finally, the old standby, classroom training can be useful in certain instances such as when you start a new job and need to quickly “download” a lot of skills and knowledge on a certain topic. This research is important to remember when you’re preparing your own development plan AND when you coach people on your staff. [Facilitators: Review this and then you may want to ask participants for a few examples of what they have done for themselves or others that have been powerful development initiatives.]

39. Cross-Functional Versatility Exposure to all functions Understanding of the organization Job/Developmental Challenges Structured experiences to facilitate development Strategic Assignments/Responsibilities Core Competencies Training on specific competencies/skills Transition training Derailment Factors Multi-rater feedback to identify strengths/development Coaching Developing Leaders with a Managerial Career Path

40. Carry an assignment from beginning to end Become involved in a merger, acquisition, strategic alliance, or partnership opportunity Implement an organization wide change initiative Negotiate agreements with external organizations Operate in a high pressure or high-visibility situation Head a visible committee or organization wide task force Enhancing Job/Developmental Challenges

41. Spiral career movements based on related experiences, knowledge & skills Career movements result in a generalist background and experience Consistent with a project and program management organizational career path Career Profile Inventory Generalist Career Path

42. TYPICAL MOTIVES Professional Growth Personal Development Continuous Learning Innovation Developing Others TYPICAL REWARDS Cross-Training Job Rotation Project Management Education Reimbursement Mentoring Assignments Generalist Career Path Typical Motives & Rewards

43. Typically remain in one occupational field for most of one’s career Remain either economically anchored to one occupational area or utilize specialized education, knowledge & credentials Some “Dual-Career” paths allow for independent contributor role Career Profile Inventory Specialist Career Path

44. TYPICAL MOTIVES Technical Competence Expertise Independence Affiliation Security Service to Others TYPICAL REWARDS Recognition Job Security Benefits Continuing Education Involvement in Professional Associations Specialist Career Path Typical Rewards & Motives

45. Frequent occupational/career /job changes often unrelated to previous experiences Traditionally viewed as “unstable” or “unreliable” Fastest growing path among women and minority groups Career Profile Inventory Entrepreneurial Career Path

46. TYPICAL MOTIVES Entrepreneurship Autonomy Variety Risk/Challenge Achievement Creativity Flexibility TYPICAL REWARDS Flexible Schedules Job Sharing Bonuses Independent Contracts Consulting Assignments Entrepreneurial Career Path Typical Motives & Rewards

47. What individual motives & rewards are most relevant for each path? What opportunities exist within your organization for each career path? What differences, if any, exist between your “Current” and “Prefer” scores on this scale? Career Path Preferences Discussion Questions

48. Entrepreneurial + Specialist = External Consultant Generalist + Specialist = Internal Consultant Entrepreneurial + Manager = Entrepreneurial Leader Generalist + Manager = Program Manager Career Path Preference Common Blends

49. Schein, E. (1978). Career Dynamics: Matching Individual and Organizational Needs. Menlo Park, Ca: Addison-Wesley. Dalton, G., Thompson, P., & Price, R. (1977). Career stages: A model of professional careers in organizations. Organizational Dynamics, Summer, 19-42. Dalton, G. & Thompson, P. (1986). Novations: Strategies for Career Management. Glenview, Ill: Foresman & Co. McClelland, D. (1976). Power is the greater motivator. Harvard Business Review, 54, 100-110. Driver, M. (1982). Career concepts: A new approach to career research. In R. Katz (ed.), Career Issues in Human Resources. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Von Glinow, M., Driver, M., Brousseau, K., & Prince, J. (1983). The design of a career oriented human resource system. Academy of Management Journal, 8, 23-32. Derr, C.B. (1986). Managing the new careerist. San Franciso, Jossey-Bass. Career Path Theory Selected References

50. PROMOTER STRATEGIST TEAM PLAYER INDEPENDENT PLAYER Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation Scale

51. Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation

52. Impression Management--Extent to which an individual sells, markets & promotes one’s self and/or his/her team Conflict Management--Extent to which an individual fights for his/her way and/or his/her team Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation

53. Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation: Impression Management

54. Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation: Conflict Management

55. PROMOTER: High Self Impression Management/Competitive Conflict Style STRATEGIST: High Self & High Team Impression Management/Collaborative Conflict Style TEAM PLAYER: High Team Impression Management/Compromising Conflict Style INDEPENDENT PLAYER: Low Self & Low Team Impression Management/Avoiding Conflict Style Career Profile Inventory Political Style Orientation

56. How would you describe the “political culture” of your organization? How are the four political styles rewarded? How are the four political styles viewed by each other? What differences, if any, exist between your “Current” and “Ideal” scores on this scale? What does this say about your political style orientation? Political Style Orientation Discussion Questions

57. K. Thomas (1976). Conflict and conflict management. In M. D. Donnette (ed.) Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Chicago: Rand McNally, pp. 889-935. K. Thomas. (1977). Toward multidimensional values in teaching: Examples of conflict behaviors. Academy of Management Journal, 2, 480-489. Kilman, T. & Thomas, K. (1978). Four perspectives of conflict management: An attributional framework for organization description and normative theory. Academy of Management Journal, 4, 59-68. Leary, M. & Kowalski, R. (1990). Impression management: A literature review and two component model. Psychological Bulletin, 107, 34-47. Political Style Theory Selected References

58. Career Profile Inventory Kenneth M. Nowack Ph.D. 3435 Ocean Park Blvd., Suite 214 ? Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 452-5130 ? (310) 450-0548 Fax [email protected]

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