The neednt foods list non essential energy dense nutritionally deficient foods
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The NEEDNT Foods List: Non-Essential Energy Dense Nutritionally Deficient Foods. Jane Elmslie, Ria Schroder Doug Sellman, Franc e s Carter . What is the NEEDNT Foods List?. A list of 50 non-essential, energy dense, nutritionally deficient foods Key money makers for the food industry

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The NEEDNT Foods List: Non-Essential Energy Dense Nutritionally Deficient Foods

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The neednt foods list non essential energy dense nutritionally deficient foods

The NEEDNT Foods List: Non-Essential Energy Dense Nutritionally Deficient Foods

Jane Elmslie, Ria Schroder Doug Sellman, Frances Carter


What is the neednt foods list

What is the NEEDNT Foods List?

  • A list of 50 non-essential, energy dense, nutritionally deficient foods

  • Key money makers for the food industry

  • Foods high in fats and added sugars, which together with salt, are the food components most commonly associated with food addiction


Why was it developed

Why was it developed?

  • Need identified from :

    • Clinician and consumer focus groups

    • WW vs OA study

    • Desire to test abstinence/moderation paradigm without compromising nutritional health

    • Lack of movement on traffic light labelling


Clinician and consumer perspectives of obesity

Clinician and Consumer Perspectives of Obesity

  • Lifestyle change crucial

  • Confusing/misinformation unhelpful

  • Treatment must address the emotional component of overeating

  • Addictive component should be acknowledged. A role for abstinence?


Weight watchers vs overeaters anonymous methodology

Weight Watchers vs Overeaters Anonymous Methodology

  • 27 obese participants

  • Attended 6 WW meetings and 6 OA meetings

  • Randomized order

  • Asked what they thought of them?

  • Asked what they thought about the concept of “problem food”?


Weight watchers vs overeaters anonymous n 27

Weight Watchers vs Overeaters Anonymous (n=27)

  • Majority not satisfied with either

  • WW – “too structured”, “too complex”, “become obsessed by counting points”, “not sustainable”, “too commercial – too much hard sell of products”

  • OA – “I’m not as bad as them”, “not comfortable with the Higher Power”, “not practical enough” “too touchy feely” suggesting that differences between OA & WW go beyond abstinence vs moderation

  • All able to identify 3-4 problem foods

  • Problem foods only part of the problem


What to do now

What to do now?

  • Simplify

  • Clarify which foods contain empty calories

  • Encourage healthy eating


Medscape news july 19 th 2011

Medscape News July 19th 2011

  • “Each day, the average American adult consumes roughly 22 teaspoons, 90 g, or 355 calories, of added sugars, well above health guidelines. Caloric sweeteners in beverages are a key source of excess calories.”

  • “New U.S. dietary guidelines recommend drinking water instead sugary drinks. Food and beverage companies say they are being unfairly singled out.”

  • “At various times, states and localities have considered taxing sugary beverages to cover obesity-related health costs.”

  • In 2009 and 2010, as such proposals became more frequent, the ABA, Coke and Pepsi collectively spent $60 million on lobbying, up from $8 million in 2007 and 2008, according to data collected by the Center for Responsive Politics' OpenSecrets.org.”


Barriers to change in clinical practice

Barriers to change in clinical practice

  • “But aren’t sugar and fat the same thing?”

  • “The citrus slice saga”

  • “I’m having muesli bars now”


Developing the list

Developing the list

  • Compiled using:

    • National Heart Foundation and Diabetes New Zealand “Foods to Avoid”, “Stop Eating” and “Optional Foods” lists

    • CDHB “Supermarket Shopping Guide”

    • USDA population guidance on discretionary calories.

  • Foods and beverages were included if they:

    • contained alcohol,

    • saturated fat,

    • added sugar,

    • were prepared using a high fat cooking method

    • contained a large amount of energy relative to their essential nutrient value.


The neednt foods list non essential energy dense nutritionally deficient foods

NON-ESSENTIAL ENERGY-DENSE NUTRITIONALLY-DEFICIENT FOODS


The neednt foods list non essential energy dense nutritionally deficient foods

NON-ESSENTIAL ENERGY-DENSE NUTRITIONALLY-DEFICIENT FOODS


The neednt foods list non essential energy dense nutritionally deficient foods

NON-ESSENTIAL ENERGY-DENSE NUTRITIONALLY-DEFICIENT FOODS


Feedback to date

Feedback to Date

  • Current research participants

    • Appreciate the clarity

    • Have been surprised at some inclusions

    • Useful as an individual guide to work out own most problematic areas

    • Useful to choose 5-10 most problematic NEEDNT foods to stop eating completely or focus on reducing significantly

    • Gives additional focus beyond portion size

  • Current patients

    • Appreciate the clarity

    • Have expressed the view that they are “addicted” to some foods on the list

    • Have used the list to prioritise non essential energy dense food consumption.

    • Have achieved their weight loss goals


Feedback to date1

Feedback to Date

  • Colleagues working in obesity treatment

    • Think the list is a valuable tool

    • Would like to use it with their clients

    • Agree with the items included on the list

  • Medical Students

    • Helps reduce confusion

    • Makes sense

    • Easy to use and talk about

  • Members of Overeaters Anonymous

    • What they would refer to as ‘top shelf’ food

    • OA members in recovery would never eat any of these foods


Where to from here

Where to from here

Obesity Treatment

  • Simple tool to help health professionals initiate conversations about food consumption patterns which may promote and maintain obesity

    Research

  • Abstinence vs. Moderation – appropriate list of foods to test this paradigm

  • Kia Akina – a new concept for participants to contemplate/try in their weight loss journey

  • NEEDNT Food List Moderation Guidelines

  • NEEDNT Food List FFQ


Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

  • Ria Schroder

  • Doug Sellman

  • Frances Carter

  • Jim Mann


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