Who am I ?
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Who am I ?. Which group do I belong to?. 我是誰?. 1. Peacock. Birds.  Male will display his elongated upper tail with green blue “eyes” before the female during courtship. 2. Clownfish. Fish.  Its name comes from its wadding way of swimming and the clown-like marking.

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Who am i

Who am I ?

Which group do I belong to?

我是誰?


Who am i

1


Who am i

Peacock

Birds

Male will display his elongated upper tail with green blue “eyes” before the female during courtship.


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Who am i

Clownfish

Fish

Its name comes from its wadding way of swimming and the clown-like marking.

It lives with anemone, benefiting from each other.


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Who am i

Amazon horned frog

Amphibians

  • It is often called “mouth with legs” because its mouth size is about half of the body.

  • Amazon horned frogs are indiscriminate about what they eat. When anything smaller than their own bodies happens by, they spring from the mud and swallow their prey whole.


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Chameleon

Reptiles

It can change its body colour when it moves from one colour environment to another.


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Starfish

Invertebrate Echinoderms

  • It has no front or back, that’s why it can move in any direction without turning.

  • Often exhibit a five-armed symmetry


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Shark

Fish – cartilaginous fish

  • No bones, just cartilage.

  • No swim bladder, it has to swim all the time to make them buoyant because unlike bony fish, it has no swim bladder.


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Penguin

Birds

  • It has a thick layer of blubber (fat) below its skin to keep warm.\

  • The ‘wing ‘ is modified for swimming rather than flying


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Moth caterpillar

Invertebrate Arthropods

This catepillar is well camouflaged.


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Who am i

Gorilla

Mammals

They are on the verge of extinction and only about 600 gorillas are left.


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Lionfish

Fish

Its spines are poisonous and its body is crossed with red bands which can frighten the enemies away.


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Leopard

Mammals

It climb trees very well.


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Hong Kong Newt

Invertebrates Amphibian

This interesting freshwater vertebrate looks like a reptile but in fact it is an Amphibian.

It is the only local Amphibian that keep itstail in the adult stage.

Striking warning colour pattern is seen on the ventral surface, but the dorsal side looks dark brown, a camouflaged colour that blends well with the substratum.


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Polar bear

Mammals

It paddles with the front feet only, hind feet are held flat and are used as rudders. It is a unique feature of four-footed land animals.

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Puffer fish

Fish

When frightened, it spines become visible as it swells its body.


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Bat-eared fox

Mammals

It uses the big ears to help release heat from the body during the daytime.

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Crocodile

Reptiles

Females are gentle mothers which build nests for their young. They will protect them against enemies, including their father.


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Sea anemone

Invertebrate Coelenterates

It looks like plants but it is an animal. It can sting the prey with its tentacles and then put it into the mouth.


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Coral

Invertebrate Coelenterates

They look like sea anemones, except that sea anemones are entirely soft-bodied while corals can build up hard skeleton.


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Sea slug

Invertebrate Molluscs

  • Soft-bodied, marine molluscs which shed their shell after their larval stage.

  • They are noted for their often extraordinary colors and striking forms.


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Sea snake

Reptiles

Sea-snakes are cold-blooded reptiles, so they live mostly in warm tropical waters. Sea-snakes are fully adapted to breathe, feed, breed and grow in the sea. For air-breathing animals, sea-snakes are remarkable divers. Some species can dive to 100 metres or more, and remain submerged for up to 80 minutes.


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Green turtle 綠海龜

Reptiles

After hatching, it is carried by current to an unknown place, then returns to the birth place, having travelled as far as 3000 km.


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Killer whale 殺人鯨

Mammals

It is an intelligent killer. Fortunately it does not have a taste for humans -- there are no records of humans attacked by them.


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Dolphin

Mammals

They are highly intelligent and curious. They locate prey by using the echo of ultrasound emitted from their head.


Who am i

Whale shark

Fishes

  • The largest of all fishes.

  • These gentle giants feed on planktons only.


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Vulture

Birds

They mainly eat dead and decaying flesh. They can fly at a speed of up to 150 km/hour and as high as 300 m.


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Cuttlefish 烏賊

Invertebrate Molluscs

They are excellent at camouflage and can match many different backgrounds.


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Scorpion

Invertebrate Arthropods

It uses claws to hold the prey and swing the telson up and over its backs to inject venom into the prey’s body.


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Jellyfish

Invertebrate Coelenterates

Its body is hollow and usually has stings which can cause painful red lesions.


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Giant tortoise

Reptiles

  • They are the largest living tortoise which can weigh over 250 kg. They move very slowly and their birth rate is extremely low.

  • Only found in some remote islands e..g the Galapagos


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Flying squirrel

Mammals

 Despite it’s name, the flying squirrel does not actually fly. Instead, this little mammal stretches the loose skin between its fore and hind legs to glide from tree to tree. Coasting like a parachute, the squirrel controls its gliding by adjusting its tail and legs.


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Axolotl – a salamander

Amphibians

The Axolotl remains in its larval form throughout its life. This means that it retains its gills and fins, and it doesn't develop the protruding eyes, eyelids and characteristics of other adult salamanders. It grows much larger than a normal larval salamander, and it reaches sexual maturity in this larval stage.

Axolotl is has amazing healing and regeneration abilities. The axolotl is fully capable of complete limb re-growth.


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tyrant leech king

Invertebrate Annelids

A new leech king of the jungle, Tyrannobdella rex—or "tyrant leech king"—was discovered in the remote Peruvian Amazon, National Geographic News reported in April.

The up-to-three-inch-long (about seven-centimeter-long) leech has large teeth, like its dinosaur namesake Tyrannosaurus rex.


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Glass frog

Invertebrate amphibian

the abdominal skin of some members of this family is transparent. The internal viscera, including the heart, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are visible through this translucent skin


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a ‘walking’ anglerfish

Fish

This curious creature, seen in Indonesian waters has not yet been definitively identified by scientists.

Scientists think is a deep sea anglerfish. Anglerfish are named for their characteristic mode of predation, wherein a fleshy growth from the fish's head acts as a lure; this is considered analogous to angling.


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Yoda Bat

Mammals

This tube-nosed fruit bat—which became a Web sensation as "Yoda bat"—is just one of the roughly 200 species encountered during two scientific expeditions to Papua New Guinea in 2009, scientists announced in October.

Though seen on previous expeditions, the bat has yet to be formally documented as a new species, or even named. Like other fruit bats, though, it disperses seeds from the fruit in its diet, perhaps making the flying mammal crucial to its tropical rain forest ecosystem.


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Dust mite

Invertebrates Arthropods

Dust mites feed on organic detritus such as flakes of shed human skin. House dust mites are a common cause of asthma and allergic symptoms worldwide.


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Glass-wing butterfly

Arthropods -- insect

Glasswing butterfly. The wing membranes of this butterfly are predominately transparent. This adaptation is a defence against predators, who find it difficult to recognise the insect as butterfly when it is either in flight or feeding. It is found in Cental America.


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Self-Cloning Lizard

Reptiles

Self-Cloning Lizard

You could call it the surprise du jour: A popular food on Vietnamese menus has turned out to be a lizard previously unknown to science, scientists said in November.

What's more, the newfound Leiolepis ngovantrii is no run-of-the-mill (ordinary) reptile—the all-female species reproduces via cloning, without the need for male lizards.


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Squid Worm

Invertebrate Annelids

Squid? Worm? Initially, this new species—with bristle-based "paddles" for swimming and tentacles on its head—so perplexed Census of Marine Life researchers that they threw in the towel and simply called it squidworm.

Found via remotely operated vehicle about 1.7 miles (2.8 kilometers) under the Celebes Sea in 2007, the ten-centimeter-long creature turned out to be the first member of a new family in the Polychaeta class of segmented worms.


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Pink Handfish

Fish

Pink Handfish

Using its fins to walk, rather than swim, along the ocean floor, the pink handfish is one of nine newly named species described in a scientific review of the handfish family released in May.

Only four specimens of the elusive four-inch (ten-centimeter) pink handfish have ever been found, and all of those were collected from areas around the city of Hobart, on the Australian island of Tasmania.


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Flounder -a flatfish

Fish

In its life cycle, an adult flounder has two eyes situated on one side of its head, where at hatching one eye is located on each side of its brain. One eye migrates to the other side of the body as a process of metamorphosis as it grows from larval to juvenile stage.

As an adult, a flounder camouflages itself by lying on the bottom of the ocean floor as protection against predators. As a result, the eyes are then on the side which faces up.


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Gastric Brooding Frog

Amphibians

Gastric Brooding Frog

A type of gastric brooding frog, the likely extinct Rheobatrachus vitellinus had—or has—a unique mode of reproduction: Females swallowed their eggs, raised tadpoles in their stomachs, and then gave birth to froglets through their mouths (pictured above).

Last seen in 1985, the Australian frog is one of the ten species that conservationists most hope to find during a first ever global search for lost amphibian species.

In addition to massive habitat loss, amphibians have declined rapidly due to the spread of the usually fatal chytrid fungus.


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Star Nosed Mole

Mammals

The star nosed mole is a tenacious creature, able to withstand severe cold and burrow easily through ice to make its home and find food. It lives in Canada and the East Coast of the United States. It favors a high protein diet of clams, snails, small rodents, mollusks and worms.


Who am i

Certificate Biology New Mastering Basic Concepts

中學會考新編基礎生物學

The END

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