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Florida Education: The Next Generation DRAFT. March 13, 2008 Version 1.0 . IEP Components for Secondary Transition Revised 12/15/09 Florida Department of Education Dr. Eric J. Smith, Commissioner.

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Florida education the next generation draft

Florida Education: The Next GenerationDRAFT

March 13, 2008

Version 1.0

IEP Components for Secondary Transition

Revised 12/15/09

Florida Department of Education

Dr. Eric J. Smith,

Commissioner


Florida education the next generation draft

  • The following slides were developed for Sheila Gritz’s presentation at the Project 10: Transition Education Network Regional Institute held in Gainesville, Florida on September 30, 2009.

  • The slides were revised on December 15, 2009, to reflect key changes to Florida State Board of Education Rules impacting secondary transition requirements.

  • The slides also incorporate a revision to the definition of functional vocational evaluation that reflect the Vocational Evaluation and Career Assessment Professional’s definition.


Objectives

Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of the secondary transition indicators with a focus on Indicator 13

  • To develop an understanding of requirements for secondary transition

  • To identify methods for merging compliance and evidence-based practices to improve outcomes for all secondary transition indicators


Secondary transition indicators focusing on indicator 13

Secondary Transition IndicatorsFocusing on Indicator 13


Secondary transition indicators

Secondary Transition Indicators

  • Indicator 1 – Graduation

  • Indicator 2 – Dropout

  • Indicator 13 – Transition Components in the IEP

  • Indicator 14 – Post-school Outcomes


Spp indicator 13 compliance indicator

SPP Indicator 13 (Compliance Indicator)

  • 100% percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    • 2007-08: 24% of 389 IEPs reviewed met requirements

    • 2008-09: 61% of 601 IEPs reviewed met requirements

      Data reflects the total number of IEPs reviewed that met requirements.


Changes coming for indicator 13

Changes coming for Indicator 13…

  • Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes

    • Appropriate measurable postsecondary goals that are annually updated

    • Based upon an age-appropriate transition assessment

    • Transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals

    • Annual IEP goals related to the student’s transition services needs


Changes coming for indicator 131

…Changes coming for Indicator 13…

  • Evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed

  • Evidence that, if appropriate, a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority


Requirements for secondary transition

Requirements for Secondary Transition


Definition of transition services

Definition of Transition Services…

“a coordinated set of activities for a student with a disability that:

  • Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; and…

    Rule 6A-6.03411(1)(nn), F.A.C.


Definition of transition services1

…Definition of Transition Services…

  • Is based on the individual student’s needs, taking into account the student’s strengths, preferences and interests; and

  • Includes:

    a. Instruction;

    b. Related services;

    c. Community experiences;

    d. The development of employment and other

    post-school adult living objectives; and

    e. If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills

    and the provision of a functional vocational

    evaluation, and

    Rule 6A-6.03411(1)(nn), F.A.C.


Definition of transition services2

…Definition of Transition Services

  • Transition services for students with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction, or a related service, if required to assist a student with a disability to benefit from special education.

    Rule 6A-6.03411(1)(nn), F.A.C.


Ages 14 and 15

Ages 14 and 15

  • Notice –

    • Purpose will be identifying transition services needs of the student

    • Student invited

  • Student’s strengths, preferences and interests taken into account and other steps taken if student doesn’t attend

  • Identifying transition services needs, to include consideration of the student’s need for instruction or the provision of information in the area of self-determination to assist the student to be able to actively and effectively participate in IEP meetings and self-advocate,so that needed postsecondary goals are in place by age 16

  • Course of study

  • Diploma selected


Ages 16 and older not calculated for i 13

Ages 16 and Older (Not calculated for I-13)

  • Notice

    • Purpose will be consideration of the postsecondary goals and transition services for the student

    • Student invited

    • Agency invited to send a representative

  • Student’s strengths, preferences and interests taken into account and other steps taken if student doesn’t attend


Ages 16 and older not calculated for i 131

Ages 16 and Older (Not calculated for I-13)

  • Diploma selected

  • Self-determination instruction or information

  • IEP team reconvened if agency fails to provide service

  • Transfer of rights documented in the IEP at 17

  • Transfer of rights notice at 18

  • Summary of Performance (SOP)


Ages 16 and older calculated for i 13

Ages 16 and Older (Calculated for I-13)

  • Measurable postsecondary goals

  • Age-appropriate transition assessment

    • Training or Education

    • Employment

    • Independent Living (where appropriate)

  • Annual goal(s)or short-term objectives or benchmarks related to the student’s transition services needs

  • Transition services

  • Courses of study

  • Agency invited

  • Consent obtained to invite agency


Measurable postsecondary goal or goals age 16 and older

Measurable Postsecondary Goal or Goals (Age 16 and Older)

  • Develop measurable postsecondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessment in the following areas:

    • Education or training

    • Employment

    • Independent living (as needed)


Education or training

Education or Training

  • Education is defined as

    • Enrollment in Adult General Education (e.g., Adult Basic Education, Adult High School Credit Program, Vocational Preparatory Instruction Program, or GED Testing Program)

    • Enrollment in technical center (certificate program)

    • Enrollment in community college (certificate program or two-year degree)

    • Enrollment in college/university (four-year degree and higher)

      Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


Education or training1

Education or Training

  • Training is defined as

    • Employment training program (e.g., Workforce Investment Act [WIA], Job Corps, AmeriCorps, Individualized)

      • Individualized means one-on-one training provided by the employer, an agency, or service provider

        Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


Employment

Employment

  • Employment is defined as

    • Competitive

      • In the competitive labor market that is performed on a full- or part-time basis in an integrated setting

      • Is compensated at or above the minimum wage

    • Supported

      • Competitive work in integrated work settings…for individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred; or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a significant disability…

        Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


Independent living as needed

Independent Living (as Needed)

  • Life skills in the following domains:

    • Leisure/Recreation

    • Maintain home and personal care

    • Community participation

      Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


Measurable postsecondary goal or goals age 16 and older1

Measurable Postsecondary Goal or Goals (Age 16 and Older)

  • A measurable postsecondary goal may address more than one of the designated areas, and must meet the following two requirements:

    • It must be measurable; you must be able to “count it” or observe it.

    • It must be intended to occur after the student graduates from school.


Frequently asked questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Measurable Postsecondary Goals


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Where on the IEP do I write the measurable postsecondary goals?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals1

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The measurable postsecondary goals should be reflected early in the IEP as every component of the IEP for students 16 and older should lead toward attainment of the measurable postsecondary goal(s).


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals2

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Does the timeframe for a measurable postsecondary goal need to address when a student will start something, such as “enroll in a two-year community college program,” or finish, such as “complete a two-year degree program?” Which constitutes best practice or is either okay?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals3

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • Districts have flexibility in the format they choose to use for measurable postsecondary goals.


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals4

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Are short-term objectives or benchmarks needed for measurable postsecondary goals?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals5

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • No. Only annual goals for students with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards are required to have short-term objectives or benchmarks.

    It is generally helpful to think of the measurable annual goals and transition services reflected in the IEP as “benchmarks” toward the measurable postsecondary goals.


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals6

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • How do we determine the student’s progress toward the measurable postsecondary goals?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals7

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • There is no requirement for reporting progress on measurable postsecondary goals.

  • If the student is making adequate yearly progress toward attaining his or her measurable annual goals and other transition services within the IEP, then the student should be making progress toward attaining his or her measurable postsecondary goals.


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals8

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • If a parent requests an Adult Day Training (ADT) program or sheltered workshop setting and services for his or her child, how do we address this in the measurable postsecondary goals?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals9

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The IEP team should always consider the most inclusive postsecondary outcomes first.

  • Ultimately the decision rests with the IEP team; however, restrictive settings and programs should be a “last” consideration.


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals10

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • For students going directly into employment who already know the skills needed to complete the job, what would measurable postsecondary goals for education or training, and employment look like? (For example, a student exits under Special Diploma Option 2 or a student who has been trained in a technical program as a tile layer.)


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals11

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The measurable postsecondary goal for education or training would likely describe the type of training the employer would provide for this student.

  • The measurable postsecondary goal for employment would likely be related to maintaining the job and/or expanding the individual’s job duties and responsibilities.


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals12

Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • What if a student’s skills do not match the student’s interests? What must be reflected in the measurable postsecondary goals?


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals13

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • A “measurable postsecondary goal” is NOT the same as a “desired post-school outcome.”


Frequently asked questions measurable postsecondary goals14

Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The measurable postsecondary goals must be based upon age-appropriate transition assessments.

  • In a recent case in Texas, the court found that “the district did not err in developing a vocational program that focused on fashion and child care – the student’s biggest strengths,” despite the fact that her interest was in music where she had limited skills. The summary stated: “So long as a transition plan reflects the student’s skills and interests, as determined through assessments, it should pass muster under the IDEA.”

    - Individuals with Disabilities Education Law Report, LRP Publications (June 12, 2009)


Measurable postsecondary goals based on age appropriate transition assessment

Measurable Postsecondary Goals based on Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • The measurable postsecondary goals must be based on age-appropriate transition assessment.


Frequently asked questions1

Frequently Asked Questions

Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment

Frequently Asked QuestionsAge-Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • How and where do I document age-appropriate transition assessment in the IEP for compliance purposes?


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment1

Frequently Asked Questions…Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • There is flexibility in where transition assessment is addressed in the IEP. Transition assessment would most likely be cited as a source and reflected in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance or the summary of assessments/evaluation data.


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment2

Frequently Asked QuestionsAge-Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • Which transition assessments require consent from parents?


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment3

Frequently Asked Questions…Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • Consent is only required if the purpose is for reevaluation.


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment4

Frequently Asked QuestionsAge Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • What is functional vocational evaluation?


Frequently asked questions age appropriate transition assessment5

Frequently Asked Questions…Age Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • Functional Vocational Evaluation (FVE) is a systematic assessment process used to identify practical, useable career and employment-related information about an individual. FVE incorporates multiple formal and informal assessment techniques to observe, describe, measure, and predict vocational potential. A distinctive feature of FVEs is that they include (and may emphasize) individualized experiential and performance-based opportunities, in natural vocational or work environments.

    (VECAP, 2009)


Annual goal s or short term objectives or benchmarks

Annual Goal(s) or Short-term Objectives or Benchmarks

  • There is/are annual goal(s) or short-term objectives or benchmarks that reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    CFR 300.320(a)(2)

    Are goal(s) or short-term objectives or benchmarks included in the IEP that will help the student make progress toward the stated postsecondary goal(s)?


Transition services

Transition Services…

  • There are transition services on the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student to facilitate the student’s articulation from school to post-school.

    34 CFR 300.320(b)(2)


Transition services1

…Transition Services…

  • For the measurable postsecondary goals on the IEP, are one or more of the following addressed:

    • Instruction

    • Related service(s)

    • Community experience(s)

    • Employment

    • Post-school adult living

    • Daily living skills (if appropriate)

    • Functional vocational evaluation (if appropriate)


Transition services2

…Transition Services

  • Transition services may be addressed through

    • The development of measurable annual goals and short-term objectives or benchmarks

    • Special education services

    • Related services

    • Program modifications/supports for school personnel

    • Supplementary aids and services

      and/or

    • State and district assessment accommodations/modifications


Transition services3

…Transition Services…

  • “No services needed” statement(s) are no longer required, but this is a good practice that districts are encouraged to continue.


Course s of study

Course(s) of Study…

  • The transition services include course(s) of study that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school.

    34 CFR 300.320(b)(2)


Course s of study1

…Course(s) of Study

  • Participation in advanced-placement courses

  • Participation in courses that provide community-based experiences to help the student acquire adult living and employment skills

    (e.g., description of instructional program and experiences)


Frequently asked questions course of study

Frequently Asked QuestionsCourse of Study…

  • Is stating the diploma decision (e.g., the student will pursue a standard diploma) sufficient in addressing the course of study?


Frequently asked questions course of study1

Frequently Asked Questions…Course of Study

  • No. A statement of the diploma selection is not descriptive of the course of study. The course of study statement should describe the student’s course of study, such as participation in advanced-placement courses for a student pursuing a standard diploma or participation in courses that provide community-based experiences to help the student acquire adult living and employment skills for a student pursuing a special diploma.


Agency invited

Agency Invited

  • If transition services are likely to be provided or paid for by another agency, a representative of the agency was invited to participate in the IEP.

    34 CFR 300.321(b)(3)


Consent to invite

Consent to Invite

  • The district obtained consent from the parent or from the student whose rights have transferred prior to inviting to the IEP team meeting a representative of an agency likely to provide or pay for transition services.

    34 CFR 300.321(b)(3)


Agency participation

Agency Participation

  • To the extent appropriate and with the consent of the parents or a student who has reached the age of majority, the school district shall invite a representative of any participating agency that may be responsible for providing or paying for transition services

  • Parental consent or the consent of the student who has reached the age of majority must also be obtained before personally identifiable information is released to officials of participating agencies providing or paying for transition services.

    Rule 6A-6.03028(3)(c)8., F.A.C.


Clarification on consent

Clarification on Consent

  • To invite an agency to an IEP meeting, “…a separate consent must be obtained from the parents or a child who has reached the age of majority for each IEP Team meeting, conducted in accordance with 34 CFR §300.320(b), before a public agency can invite a representative of any participating agency that is likely to be responsible for providing or paying for transition services to attend the meeting.”

    February 6, 2009, Memorandum and OSEP Letter


Spp 13

SPP – 13…

  • The IEP includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    34 CFR 300.320(b)


Spp 131

…SPP – 13

The culmination of all components of the IEP for a student who is 16 years old or older must reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goals!


Reevaluation and summary of performance

Reevaluation and Summary of Performance…

  • “Reevaluation is not required for a student before the termination of eligibility due to graduation with a standard diploma or exiting from school upon reaching the student’s twenty-second (22) birthday.”

  • “The district must provide the student with a summary of academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the postsecondary goals.”


Reevaluation and summary of performance1

…Reevaluation and Summary of Performance…

  • Graduation from high school with a standard diploma constitutes a change of placement and requires prior written notice.

    • Does not require reevaluation

      • Not a change in eligibility

      • Not dismissal from program


Reevaluation and summary of performance2

…Reevaluation and Summary of Performance

  • Summary of Performance (SOP)

    • Academic achievement and functional performance

    • Recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting postsecondary goals


Summary of performance sop

Summary of Performance (SOP)…

  • Required for students exiting school with a Standard Diploma or aging out of program

  • Recommended practice for all students exiting school (e.g., Special Diploma prior to age 22)


Summary of performance sop1

…Summary of Performance (SOP)

  • Education or Training/Employment/Independent Living

  • Describes:

    • Accommodation needs

    • Assistive technology needs

    • Support needs

    • Academic and functional performance summary

      • Transition assessments

      • Report cards, grades, etc.


Frequently asked questions summary of performance

Frequently Asked QuestionsSummary of Performance…

  • Are districts required to hold an “exiting IEP meeting” for students who are near graduation?


Frequently asked questions summary of performance1

Frequently Asked Questions…Summary of Performance

  • No. However, districts must complete a Summary of Performance (SOP) for students’ whose eligibility terminates due to graduation with a standard diploma or exceeding the age of eligibility.

    The Nationally Ratified Summary of Performance template suggests that the SOP is most useful when linked with the IEP process and the student has the opportunity to actively participate in the development of this document.


Free and appropriate public education fape

Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

  • Students age 18 through 21 who have not received a standard diploma may continue until their 22nd birthday, or at the discretion of the school district, through the semester or the end of the school year in which they turn 22.

  • Students who have exited school with any type of special diploma, certificate, or GED (not under GED Exit Option) may re-enter at any time prior to their 22nd birthday.


For additional information contact

For additional information contact:

Sheila Gritz, Program Specialist for Transition

Team Leader Indicators 13 and 14

Florida Department of Education

Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services

(850) 245-0478

[email protected]

www.fldoe.org/ese


Florida education the next generation draft1

Florida Education: The Next GenerationDRAFT

March 13, 2008

Version 1.0

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