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Value Added Tools. Emerson Lean Supply Chain Training Ver.06.26.2006. Agenda. Welcome & Introductions Emerson Supply Chain Development Overview Lean Basics Foundation Elements Value Stream Mapping Value Added Tools Non-Value Added Tools Quality Tools Implementing Lean.

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Value added tools

Value Added Tools

Emerson Lean Supply Chain Training

Ver.06.26.2006


Agenda

Agenda

  • Welcome & Introductions

  • Emerson Supply Chain Development Overview

  • Lean Basics

  • Foundation Elements

  • Value Stream Mapping

  • Value Added Tools

  • Non-Value Added Tools

  • Quality Tools

  • Implementing Lean


Project identificaton for value added parts of vsm

PROJECT IDENTIFICATON FOR: VALUE ADDED PARTS OF VSM

What:

  • A Comparison of Process Rates vs. Takt Time

    How:

  • Chart Process Rate Against Takt Time and 25% Surge Takt Time

  • Identify Process Rates That are Significantly Below or Above Takt Rate as Potential Project Areas

    Why:

  • Goal is to Balance the VSM Process Rates Against Customer Demand

  • Identifying Areas Where VSM is not Balanced Determines Project Areas

    Formulas:

  • Takt Time = Working Minutes per Day Customer Demand per Day

  • Process Rate = (Cycle Time x Flow %) (Batch Size x Actual Resources)


Balancing the flow

Balancing the Flow

  • Takt Time Line Balancing

  • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)


Balancing the flow1

Balancing the Flow

  • Takt Time Line Balancing

  • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)


Takt time and process rate

Takt Time and Process Rate

  • Takt Time = Customer Demand Rate

  • Process Rate = Rate at which process is creating parts


Takt time

Takt Time

I want!

  • Takt Time is the rate at which the customer is demanding product.

CUSTOMER


Process rate resources 1

Process Rate-Resources=1

Ship...


Process rate resources 2

Process Rate-Resources=2

Ship...

Ship...


Takt time and process rate1

Takt Time and Process Rate


Vs balancing

VS Balancing

Takt time=105 sec

Seconds


Takt time analysis

Takt time=105 sec

Seconds

Takt Time Analysis

  • Work Distribution

  • Multiple Stations

  • Break-up Stations

  • Redistribute Steps


Break up steps

Break-up Steps


Takt time analysis1

Takt time=105 sec

Seconds

Takt Time Analysis

  • Process Efficiency

  • Reduce:

  • Down Time

  • Speed Loss

  • Defect Time Loss

80


Balancing the flow2

Balancing the Flow

  • Takt Time Line Balancing

  • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)

  • Poka-Yoke (Mistake Proofing)

  • Six Sigma


Value added tools

OEE

Starts with GOOD Measurement

Speed

Losses

Downtime

Losses

Overall

Equipment

Effectiveness

(OEE)

Defect Losses


Overall equipment effectiveness

Total Available Time

Downtime

Losses

Operating Time

Speed

Losses

Net Operating

Time

Value-

Added

Operating

Time

Defect

Losses

Overall Equipment Effectiveness

  • TPM (Total Productive Maintenance)

  • SMED(Single Minute Exchange of Dies)

Equipment Failures

  • Procedures

  • Training

  • Workplace Organization

Set-Up and

Adjustment

Minor Stoppages

  • Process Capability

  • Process Control

  • Poka-Yoke

Reduced Speed

Defects in Process

Start-up and Set-up

Losses


Oee for turning operation

Total Available Time

OEE for Turning Operation

Data averaged from one month period:

Downtime

Losses

Operating Time

Net Operating

Time

Speed

Value-Added

Operating

Time

Defects


Balancing the flow3

Balancing the Flow

  • Takt Time Line Balancing

  • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)


Set up reduction

Set-Up Reduction

  • Be prepared and organized

  • Data driven

    • Video capture

    • Multiple video if possible

    • Counter on tape best

    • Unless too noisy; audio is good (“I’m going to get a special torque wrench”)

  • Team heavy with experience; not engineers

  • “Some” fresh eyes look - “Why Nots”

  • Phased approach


Data capture

Data Capture

  • Start-Stop and activity description

  • Identify as

    • “Internal” - activity that must be done while machine is down (I.e. load tooling)

    • “External” - activity that MIGHT be able to be done while machine is operating (I.e. go get new tooling)

  • Further identify

    • Value-added - (I.e. load tool)

    • Non-Value-added; but essential (the ways things are done today) - (I.e. align tool)

    • Waste - (I.e. go find some tools)

  • Might also capture

    • # people performing the task

    • distance traveled

    • “other”


Value added tools

SMED-Changeover Operations Analysis Chart


Phased approach

Phased Approach

  • Phase 1 - Can accomplish in less than 1 week

    • Eliminate obvious waste

    • Make as much “external” work truly external to the set-up

    • Will find 40-50% of reduction in this phase

  • Phase 2 - May take another month to complete

    • Low cost / no cost improvements -- alignment blocks, different clamps; standardized nuts and bolts, etc.

    • “Pit Crew” alternatives

    • Will find another 40-50% of what was left

  • SMED actions - Timeframe varies

    • Actually targets “single digits”

    • May require investment - preheat mechanisms, load from different direction; electronic help, etc.


Smed example

SMED - Example

PIC, Gary Hamilton


Lathe setup reduction

Lathe Setup Reduction

  • Setup Reduction Benefits and Goals

    • Stated Goals

      • All GMTC CNC lathe setups <10 minutes!

      • Operator involvement, use the people who see the problems

    • Benefits

      • The focal point for lead-time improvements

      • Improve flexibility

      • Reduce cycle time

      • Increase equipment utilization

      • Lower costs

    • Process

      • Step 1: CL01 & CL02 implementation

      • Step 2: Remain load redistribution

      • Step 3: Tooling and process improvement

      • Step 4: Area organization


Lathe setup reduction cl01 cl02

27%

55%

Lathe Setup Reduction: CL01 & CL02

  • Reduce set-up cycle time on 8% of total product offering (30% of non-forecasted)

  • Increases value-added production time on CL01 and CL02 by 358 minutes per day

Average 24 min saving / setup


Lathe setup reduction cl01 cl021

Lathe Setup Reduction: CL01 & CL02

*Need additional time studies to verify improvement.

*CL02 has 3 primary jaws covering 80% volume.


Lathe setup reduction cl01 cl022

Lathe Setup Reduction: CL01 & CL02

Before

After

Tool Standardization

Work Place Organization


Value added tools

SMED

  • SMED – Single Minute Exchange of Dies

  • Quick Change processes

  • Setup Reduction

    No matter what you call it, the goal is the same! Spend more time making product and less time getting ready to make product.


Shigeo shingo father of smed

Shigeo Shingo (Father of SMED)

Shigeo Shingo’s teachings can be classified into the three concepts:

· Just In Time (JIT)

· Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

· Zero Quality Control

Shigeo Shingo, as part of JIT, also pioneered the concept of Single Minute Exchange of Dies. SMED was developed in order to reduce the fixed cost associated with the setup and changeover of dies. The basic elements driving the SMED concept are to reduce the setup time of dies, which directly result in smaller batch sizes for parts. A smaller batch size translates as lower costs associated with work in process inventory storage. This concept is especially beneficial as it allows the manufacturing system to quickly adjust to engineering design changes with very little cost. In addition, SMED allows for higher machine utilization, and in turn, results in higher productivity.


Resources

Resources

  • “The Winner’s Circle” Video

    • An introduction to quick changeover techniques, this tape compares the teamwork and speed necessary to be successful in Indy 500 car racing with what's needed to affect quick changeovers on the shop floor. You'll see the changeover on an 800-ton press reduced from 22 hrs. to 10 min.

  • Quick Changeover for Operators

    • Shingo's book on the SMED system redesigned for operators. Application of Shingo's techniques can reduce lead-time from weeks to days and lower work-in-process inventory and warehousing costs.

      http://www.dti.gov.uk/mbp/bpgt/m9ja00001/m9ja0000112.html

      http://www.public.iastate.edu/~vardeman/IE361/f02mini/bumblauskas.pdf

      http://www.geocities.com/parthadeb/smed.html

http://www.wcmfg.com/WinnersCircleVideo.htm

http://www.productivitypress.com/cgi-local/SoftCart.exe/?E+scstore


Tools

Tools

  • The video camera is a must, you will need to record the process and watch it over and over and over and over.

  • You will have to time the process multiple times by multiple operators. Remember, “We perform to what we measure”. Always make time to measure, ALWAYS.


Balancing the flow4

Balancing the Flow

  • Takt Time Line Balancing

  • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)

  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED)

  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)


Other critical maintenance data

Other Critical Maintenance Data

MTBF - Mean Time Between Failure

MTTR - Mean Time To Repair

May require more sophisticated monitoring approaches on critical equipment; many tools on the market


From measurement to resolution

  • Equipment condition

  • PM

  • Complexity

  • Operator training

MTBF

  • Organizing maintenance; technical training

  • Spare parts management

  • Craft coordination and scheduling

  • Conflicting priorities

MTTR

From Measurement to Resolution


Seven steps of autonomous maintenance

1. Conduct initial cleaning/inspection

2. Eliminate sources of contamination

3. Establish provisional standards (include metrics!)

4. Develop general inspection training

5. Conduct general inspections

6. Improve workplace management and control

7. Participate in advanced improvement activities

Seven Steps ofAutonomous Maintenance


Abnormality summary sheet sample

Abnormality Summary Sheet (sample)


Tpm checklist

TPM Checklist


Tpm visual reference

TPM Visual Reference


Tpm visual identification

TPM - Visual Identification


Problem tag

Problem Tag


Summary value added tools

Summary-Value Added Tools

  • One of the first steps in creating the Future state map is to balance the VA steps in a VSM

  • This can be accomplished by adding and removing capacity or by improving bottleneck efficiency

  • Perform an OEE on bottleneck processes before replicating them


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