Writing for the web basic principles
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 20

Writing for the Web: Basic Principles PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 50 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Writing for the Web: Basic Principles. A Slide Show by Crawford Kilian. Web Consumers. Lookers: TV refugees Readers: Print refugees Users: Information grabbers Shoppers: Online bargain hunters Listeners: Audiophiles. Web Content Producers. Merchants Governments NGOs Schools Advocates

Download Presentation

Writing for the Web: Basic Principles

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Writing for the web basic principles

Writing for the Web: Basic Principles

A Slide Show by

Crawford Kilian


Web consumers

Web Consumers

  • Lookers: TV refugees

  • Readers: Print refugees

  • Users: Information grabbers

  • Shoppers: Online bargain hunters

  • Listeners: Audiophiles


Web content producers

Web Content Producers

  • Merchants

  • Governments

  • NGOs

  • Schools

  • Advocates

  • “Talkers”: Self-publishers, bloggers


Communication models

Communication Models

  • Instrumental model:

    • “Do what I say.”

  • Constructivist model:

    • “Is this what you want?”


Web readers

Web Readers:

  • Slower readers (-25%)

  • Skimmers and scanners

  • Impatient

  • Addicted to jolts


Text on the computer screen

Text on the Computer Screen

  • Low resolution = hard to read

  • Author can’t control page appearance

  • Print text doesn’t work except in archives


Principles of webwriting

Principles of Webwriting

  • Orientation

  • Information

  • Action


Orientation

Orientation

  • Where am I?

  • What’s this site about?

  • How do I get around it?


Orientation elements

Orientation Elements

  • Minimalism

  • Coherence

  • Headlines, subheads, blurbs, links


Information

Information

  • What do you have to tell me?

  • Is it in a format I can use?


Information elements i

Information Elements: I

  • Who’s your audience?

  • What’s your “exformation”?

  • Organization: narrative, logical, categorical?

  • Clarity

  • Correctness


Information elements ii

Information Elements: II

  • Hooks:

    • Direct address

    • Quotation

    • Question

    • Unusual statement

    • Promise of conflict

    • News peg


Information elements iii

Information Elements: III

  • Links are self-explanatory

    • Visit CBC Radio Overnight

  • Blurbs give more reasons to go there

    • Great programs for Canadian insomniacs


Information elements iv

Information Elements: IV

  • Chunks

    • 80-100 words

    • Break into short paragraphs

    • Use subheads if helpful

  • Scrolling Text

    • Include internal links to speed navigation

  • Bulleted lists


Action

Action

  • “You” attitude

  • Positive attitude

  • Response cues

    • Solve a problem

    • Easy response

    • Quick response


Editing webtext i

Editing Webtext: I

  • Active voice

  • Concrete Anglo-Saxon words

  • Strong verbs

  • Simple sentences (under 20 words)

  • Short paragraphs (under 5 sentences)

  • Frequent headings and subheads


Editing webtext ii

Editing Webtext: II

  • Don’t respect the text!

  • The 50% rule

  • Print out to proofread


Edit for global readers

Edit for Global Readers

  • Short sentences, real subject first

  • Positive language

  • Avoid slang, idioms

  • Avoid phrasal verbs (write up, write down)

  • Avoid “miniword” clusters (as a kind of a way to make the reader confused)


The subtext of webtext

The Subtext of Webtext

  • Register: public or intimate?

  • Nonverbal message

    • Can undercut verbal message

    • Always more trusted than verbal message

    • Built into site structure and graphics as well as text


  • Login