Analysing openings endings and whole passages
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Analysing Openings, Endings and Whole Passages. Close Reading Revision. An article needs an opening that will arouse the reader’s interest. Here are a few methods which might be used to achieve this aim: A humorous comment An anecdote (story to illustrate a point) A personal experience

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Analysing Openings, Endings and Whole Passages

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Analysing openings endings and whole passages

Analysing Openings, Endings and Whole Passages

Close Reading Revision


Evaluating opening paragraphs

An article needs an opening that will arouse the reader’s interest. Here are a few methods which might be used to achieve this aim:

  • A humorous comment

  • An anecdote (story to illustrate a point)

  • A personal experience

  • Surprising fact or statistics

  • A question to make the reader think

  • A summary of the main ideas to be examined in detail in the rest of the passage

Evaluating Opening Paragraphs


Examples of effective openings

How to be a flight attendant

Until someone invents a ‘beam me up’ type transporter, you’re unlikely to knock off work and find yourself in a different country to the one you started in. Unless, that is, your day’s work happens to involve manning a commercial airline. The idea that life as a flight attendant is one long glamorous jetset might explain the job’s appeal – but, of course, the image only portrays a tiny part of the reality.

Examples of effective openings


Examples of effective openings1

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China, a fortified line stretching 4,000km across deserts, mountains and grasslands, is a true Wonder – and a costly military mistake. But no matter that it never worked; today it’s irresistibly romantic, and deservedly China’s top sight.

Examples of effective openings


Examples of effective openings2

Just truckin’:

a five week overland trip in Africa

Apart from a bout of malaria, a box-jellyfish attack, several baboon raids, a lost passport and a mauling by a lion, the trip went off with surprisingly few mishaps.

Examples of effective openings


Evaluating conclusions

These questions ask you to consider HOW EFFECTIVE you think the writer has been.

REMEMBER! The passage has been chosen for the exam because it is effective, therefore you are advised to answer evaluation questions positively.

To evaluate a conclusion successfully, you must show clear links between the conclusion and the rest of the article(it’s like answering half a link question).

HINT: Remember to use words like “reinforces”, “effective” and “appropriate” throughout your answer.

Evaluating Conclusions


Evaluating the whole passage

In these questions, you need to show an appreciation of how effective the writer has been in achieving his / her purpose, whatever it may be.

In Evaluation questions, you may include material that has already been discussed in the Understanding and Analysis questions.

Look carefully at the number of marks available. It is a good idea to include one quote / close reference followed by a comment for each mark available.

Think about the writer’s purpose. Is it to persuade, or provoke thought, or to be humorous, for example? How well has the writer achieved this purpose?

Evaluating the Whole Passage


Evaluating the whole p assage

  • Remember to read the question carefully, and ask yourself, “What do I have to do to answer this question?”

  • Some Evaluation questions will ask for your comments on STYLE (techniques) and ARGUMENTS (content).

Evaluating the Whole Passage


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