Welcome to CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management

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CHAMPs. A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom ManagementIntroduction. Our Goals. Provide an overview of CHAMPsHighlight specific CHAMPs tasks in each moduleShare options for CHAMPs training at your schoolShare additional resources to supplement and support CHAMPs. Introduction to CHAM

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1. Welcome to CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Soraya Coccimiglio, Katy Holverstott, and Janice DiGiovanni Van Buren Intermediate School District Have a seat and make yourself comfortable!

2. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Introduction

3. Our Goals Provide an overview of CHAMPs Highlight specific CHAMPs tasks in each module Share options for CHAMPs training at your school Share additional resources to supplement and support CHAMPs SorayaSoraya

4. Introduction to CHAMPs

5. CHAMPs: What IS It? A set of decisions the teacher must make in order to structure for TODAY’S STUDENTS A “Template” A Process A Common Language Among Staff

6. CHAMPs: What It Is Not? A Canned Program Another Bandwagon Just a Product All teachers ARE NOT expected to have the same CHAMPs expectations!

7. Introduction to CHAMPs Why Champs? The goal of classroom management is to develop a classroom of students who are: Responsible Motivated Highly engaged in meaningful tasks

8. Introduction to CHAMPs Understatement: Not all students come to us motivated and/or responsible. Some are responsible and highly motivated. Some are responsible, but only moderately motivated. Some are like Huck Finn, severely at risk.

9. A Note about Huck Finn Graduation Rates in the U.S. 1900: 6% 1946: 48% 1998: 71% 2002: 71% In Michigan 78% overall 48% Hispanic 56% African American 78 % White (Source: Greene & Winters, 2005)

10. VideoVideo

11. Introduction to CHAMPs CHAMPs provides research-based techniques and strategies that can improve student behavior, attitude, and motivation. Appendix 1 pg. 391 “What the Research Says”Appendix 1 pg. 391 “What the Research Says”

12. The CHAMPs Basic Beliefs Teachers can structure and organize their classrooms to prompt responsible student behavior. Teachers should overtly and consciously teach students how to behave responsibly in every classroom/school situation.

13. The CHAMPs Basic Beliefs Teachers should focus more time, attention, and energy on acknowledging responsible behavior than responding to misbehavior. Teachers should preplan their responses to misbehavior to ensure that they will respond in a brief, calm, and consistent manner.

14. Introduction to CHAMPs RtIRtI

15. Introduction to CHAMPs The acronym CHAMPs reflects the “categories” or types of expectations that you, as a teacher need to clarify for students about every major activity or transition that occurs in your classroom.

16. The CHAMPs Acronym Conversation: Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition? Help: How can students ask questions during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention? Activity: What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product? Movement: Can students move about during this activity/transition? Can they sharpen their pencil? Participation: What does appropriate student work behavior for this activity/transition look/sound like?

17. CHAMPs Expectations for Us! CONVERSATION Honest, out loud, and on topic Humor is good Cell phones off or on vibe HELP Questions are great! Ask at any time Any question or concern can be addressed/discussed by the group

18. CHAMPs Expectations for Us! ACTIVITY Lecture Activities Individual tasks MOVEMENT Stand, stretch, use the restroom Get coffee, a bite to eat PARTICIPATION Be on time after breaks Share--we can benefit from others experiences

19. CHAMPs Modules CHAMPs is organized into 8 modules. Each module focuses on one important aspect of effective classroom management. Within each module, specific tasks are presented to help you achieve such tasks. Each module includes a self assessment tool that you can use to identify which of the tasks you have completed, and those you still need to address.

20. CHAMPs Modules Module 1: Vision Module 2: Organization Module 3: Expectations Module 4: The First Month Module 5: Motivation Module 6: Monitor & Revise Module 7: Correction Procedures Module 8: Class-wide Motivation Systems Page 3—flow chart--reviewPage 3—flow chart--review

21. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 1 Vision

22. Module 1: Vision You must know for which harbor you are headed if you are able to catch the right wind to take you there. Seneca

23. Module 1: Vision Task 1: Long-Range Classroom Goals Task 2: Guidelines for Success (PBS Behavior Expectations) Task 3: Positive Expectations Task 4: Family Contacts Task 5: Professionalism Task 6: Behavior Management Principles Task 7: Level of Classroom Structure

24. Vision: Task 4 Family Contacts Build positive relationships with your students’ families by making initial contact with them at the beginning of the year and maintaining contact throughout the year.

25. Vision: Task 4 Family Contacts The probability of effectively educating students increases tremendously when schools and families work together. The greater the needs of the students, the greater the need to establish and maintain contact with their families.

26. Vision: Task 4 Family Contacts Ideally contact should be made before school starts. Contacts within the first 2 weeks of school will increase parental involvement throughout the school year. It’s never too late to initiate a relationship with your students’ families.

27. Vision: Task 4 Family Contacts Provide the following information: A welcome greeting that indicates that you are interested in getting to know your students’ families Some information about your background A list of the major goals for the rest of the year (academic and social-emotional) The best time for parents to contact you A copy of classroom guidelines for success and rules Invitation for questions or comments

28. Vision: Task 6 Behavior Management Principles

29. Vision: Task 6 Behavior Management Principles Small Group Activity Divide into groups of 3-4 Assign each person one section to read: Promoting Responsible Behavior (p. 30-31) Misbehavior Occurs for a Reason (p. 31-32) Case Study (p. 32-34) Teach your assigned section to the other members of your group.

30. Vision: Level of Structure Determine whether your students need a classroom management plan that involves high, medium, or low structure. When a class has high risk factors and there is low structure, academic and behavior problems will occur. Disengagement causes chaos!

31. Vision: Level of Structure To determine the level of structure needed for your management plan, take 5 minutes to complete the “Management and Discipline Planning Questionnaire”

32. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 2 Organization

33. Organization When you have well organized routines and procedures for your classroom, you model and prompt organized behavior from your students.

34. Organization Classroom organization influences the behavior and motivation of students. This module presents 7 tasks to help organize a classroom. These tasks can be completed before school starts so that a solid organizational structure is in place beginning on day one.

35. Organization Task 1: Daily Schedule Task 2: Physical Space Task 3: Attention Signal Task 4: Beginning and Ending Routines Task 5: Classroom Rules Task 6: Student Work Task 7: Classroom Management Plan

36. Organization: Classroom Rules Identify and post 3-5 classroom rules that will be used as a basis for providing positive and corrective feedback.

37. Organization: Classroom Rules Keep the number of rules to a Keep the wording of rules Have rules logically represent your

38. Organization: Classroom Rules Keep the wording Make your rules Make your rules describe behavior that is

39. Organization: Classroom Rules Publicly post rules in a Tie following the rules to Always include a

40. Organization: Classroom Rules Students should be as familiar with the consequences as they are with the rules. (Consider a “What If Chart.”) Deliberately teach the consequences for rule infractions and rule compliance. Consider different rules for different centers. Handout of “What if chart”Handout of “What if chart”

41. Organization: Classroom Rules Example rules: Arrive on time with all of your materials. Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself. Work during all work times. Follow directions immediately.

42. Organization: Classroom Management Plan Prepare a “Classroom Management Plan” with which you can summarize the important information, policies, and procedures that you will use to motivate students and address student misbehavior.

43. Organization: Classroom Management Plan Major categories of the Classroom Management plan: Level of classroom structure (Module 1) Guidelines for success (Module 1) Rules (Module 2) Teaching expectations (Modules 3 & 4) Monitoring (Module 6) Acknowledgement procedures (Module 5) Correction procedures (Module 7) Managing student work (Module 2)

44. Organization: Classroom Management Plan See example of a Classroom Management Plan CHAMPs training/classes provide teachers a framework and guidance for developing a complete Classroom Management Plan that is compatible with school-wide PBS. Administrators should review and approve classroom management plans.Administrators should review and approve classroom management plans.

45. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 3 Expectations

46. Expectations When your expectations are clear, students never have to guess how you expect them to behave.

47. Expectations Avoid misbehaviors by clearly defining and then explicitly teaching students how you expect them to behave in class and during transitions. Expectations will vary from teacher to teacher. What are your expectations? The purpose of the CHAMPs acronym is to provide a template for which you define your expectations for your students’ behavior in any given setting or activity.

48. Expectations: CHAMPs Conversation: Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition? Help: How can students ask questions during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention? Activity: What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product? Movement: Can students move about during this activity/transition? Can they sharpen their pencil? Participation: What does appropriate student work behavior for this activity/transition look/sound like?

49. Randy Sprick on Expectations Video

50. Expectations It is noted that clearly defined behavior expectations are not enough. Expectations must also be communicated and taught in a 3-step process:

51. Expectations This module focuses on the application of the 3-step process to teach expectations for the following activities: Classroom activities Transitions Preparation of lessons on expectations Use of common areas (hallways, cafeteria, etc.) Social skills

52. Expectations for Classroom Activities Define clear and consistent behavioral expectations for all regularly scheduled classroom activities (e.g., small group instruction, independent work periods, etc.)

53. Expectations for Classroom Activities The first step is to make a list of the major types of activities that students will engage in on a daily basis. This list may include: Attendance routines Teacher-directed instruction Small group instruction Independent work Sustained silent reading Class meetings Taking tests/quizzes Centers/lab stations Peer tutoring sessions Cooperative Groups “Cushion” activities Choose either small group reading instruction or independent seat workChoose either small group reading instruction or independent seat work

54. Expectations for Classroom Activities Use the CHAMPs acronym to define detailed behavior expectations for that activity. Details are important, the more specific you are, the easier it will be to communicate your expectation to your students. Pay close attention to the level of structure your students need. The greater the structure, the tighter you will need to design your expectations.

55. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 4 The First Month

56. The First Month When you teach students how to behave responsibly during the first month of school, you dramatically increase their chances of having a productive year.

57. The First Month It is MUCH easier to teach responsible behaviors from the very first day than to deal with negative behaviors throughout the year. The tasks of the first month ensure that you build positive relationships with students and communicate your expectations clearly. Research shows: Teachers who take the time to teach expectations explicitly, get further in the curriculum than teachers who don’t.

58. The First Month Task 1: Final Preparations Task 2: Day 1 Task 3: The First Four Weeks Task 4: Special Circumstances (substitute teachers, assemblies, field trips, etc.)

59. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 5 Motivation

61. Motivation Task 1: Enthusiasm Task 2: Effective Instruction Task 3: “Noncontingent” Attention Task 4: Positive Feedback Task 5: Intermittent Celebrations Task 6: Ratio of Interactions

62. E x V Theory of Motivation Expectancy x Value = Motivation Expectancy = degree to which an individual expects to be successful at that task. Value = degree to which an individual values the reward(s) that accompany that success. Feather (1982)

63. E x V Theory of Motivation Often educators attribute a lack of motivation only to the value component of the formula. “He doesn’t care about good grades.” “He doesn’t care about free time or stickers.” These explanations do not take expectancy into account. If either one of these factors is 0, then motivation is 0.

64. Motivation The simplest way to ensure that students expect success is to make sure that they achieve it consistently. Brophy, 1987

65. Motivation: Task 4 Positive Feedback Effective positive feedback is: Accurate and related to behaviors that occur. Specific and descriptive. Immediate as possible. Contingent on behavior that has some level of importance (“don’t praise junk”) Age appropriate and cool. Given in a manner that fits your style. I Feed AV (Jenson) New tasks, something that takes a lot of effort, difficulty or prideNew tasks, something that takes a lot of effort, difficulty or pride

66. Motivation: Task 6 Ratio of Interaction Our students are very demanding of attention and will go to many lengths to get it. An emotionally intense reprimand may be more rewarding than a brief “good job.” Which is longer, more rich and intense? Your feedback for positive behavior or your corrections for negative behavior?

67. Motivation: Task 6 Ratio of Interaction The behavior you attend to the most will be the one that you will see more of in the future. What behavior do you attend to? Positive student behavior or negative student behavior?

68. “They can’t get your goat if they don’t know where it’s tied” Bill Jenson

69. Motivation: Task 6 Ratio of Interaction Not only is what you attend to important, the frequency and distribution of your attention is also important. Research says: Teachers should use a 5:1 ratio. For every 1 corrective or negative interaction, the teacher needs to provide 5 positives for appropriate behavior.

70. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 6 Monitor & Revise

71. Monitor & Revise When you monitor what is actually going on in your classroom, you are able to make adjustments to your Classroom Management Plan

72. The teacher reviews his/her implementation of essential concepts of previous modules. Tool 1 : CHAMPs vs. Daily Reality Scale Tool 2: Ratio of Interactions Monitoring Form Tool 3: Misbehavior Recording Sheet Tool 4: Gradebook Analysis Worksheet Tool 5: On-Task Behavior Observation Sheet Tool 6: Family/Student Satisfaction Survey Monitor & Revise

73. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 7 Correction Procedures

74. Correction Procedures Duck Tape: the Answer to Misbehavior?

75. Correction Procedures When you treat student misbehavior as an instructional opportunity, you give students the chance to learn from their mistakes.

76. Correction Procedures 3 important concepts: Being prepared for misbehavior reduces annoyance and frustration. Correction procedures are only effective if they reduce the future occurrence misbehavior. This means data! Most chronic misbehavior serves a purpose.

77. Analyze Misbehavior Be prepared to categorize misbehaviors as awareness type, ability type, attention-seeking, or escape/avoidance type– and be prepared to use a basic correction strategy for each category.

78. Analyze Misbehavior Types of misbehavior: A. Awareness type: student is unaware of the misbehavior. The intervention should focus on making expectations clear, and helping the student become more aware of her behavior and its affect on others. B. Ability type: student misbehaves because she does not know how to exhibit the appropriate behavior. The intervention should focus on teaching the student how and when to perform the appropriate behavior. (continued)

79. Analyze Misbehavior Types of misbehavior (continued): C. Attention seeking type: student engages in misbehavior to gain attention from peers and/or adults. Interventions should involve ignoring the misbehavior, and teaching and reinforcing the appropriate behavior (a.k.a. DRA). D. Escape/avoidance type: includes behavior that functions to release the student from an aversive situation or person(s). Interventions will vary based on the specific function of the behavior but will likely include corrective consequences.

80. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior For ongoing misbehavior that functions to release the student from an aversive situation or person(s), be prepared to develop and implement an intervention plan that will likely include corrective consequences.

81. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Much chronic misbehavior occurs to help a student escape or avoid something. Avoid difficult work or aversive work Avoid aversive social situation (adult, peer) Avoid school in general The use of corrective consequences alone, however, is not sufficient. Your intervention must also include a component in which appropriate or responsible behavior will be rewarded.

82. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Step 1: Remove any positive consequences that are maintaining the misbehavior by: Ensuring that the student will no longer get what he/she has been getting from the misbehavior (attention, etc.). Ensuring that the student will no longer get out of what he/she has been avoiding with the misbehavior (work, social interaction).

83. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Step 2: Demonstrate that positive behavior (a replacement behavior) leads to positive results for the student. Example: if the student misbehaves to get out of work, give breaks contingent upon work.

84. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior The replacement behavior must: Yield as immediate positive results for the student as the misbehavior (long-term reward plans are unlikely to work with these students.) Be a behavior that the student can easily do (not a new or difficult behavior for the student). A good replacement behavior makes the problem behavior irrelevant, inefficient, and ineffective for the student.

85. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Suggested Rewards for Replacement Behaviors: Extra free time Free homework coupon Skip an assignment coupon Contingent breaks Work-break schedule

86. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Step 3: When possible, make the situation the student is avoiding less aversive. E.g.: Would it help to change the way the task is presented? Is the pace too slow? Too boring? Is the work too hard? Does the student need extra help? Does the student know how to ask for help? Does the student know what to do to get out of uncomfortable social situations? Would counseling or social skills training make the situation easier? Is there a different place for the student to sit or work?

87. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Step 4: Implement corrective consequences appropriate to the misbehavior. Plan to be consistent. Make sure the corrective consequence fits the severity and frequency of the misbehavior. Plan to implement the consequence unemotionally. If it is necessary to interact with the student at the time of the misbehavior, be brief and never argue.

88. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Suggested Corrective Consequences: Time owed Extra work Work during recess After school work session Restitution Positive practice (do it the right way 3 times) Overcorrection (fix it to better than it was before) Response cost/loss of privileges Demerits

89. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Non-Examples: “Linda, you skipped 2 days, so we’re going to suspend you for two more.” “Joey, you lost your math book because you’re obviously not ready to learn today.” “If you’re just going to sit there, you can sit in the office.” “You earned detention for not completing your work 3 days in a row.”

90. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior Also, corrective consequences will be more effective if you remember to: Involve the student in developing the incentive part of the plan. Providing extra help in teaching the replacement skill. (E.g., social skills training, extra help with academic tasks, etc.)

91. Escape/Avoidance Misbehavior With your neighbor, discuss a student you know who demonstrates escape/avoidance behavior. Share some strategies that you might consider using.

92. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management MODULE 8 Classwide Motivation Systems

93. Classwide Motivation Systems There are many circumstances in which a classwide, rather than an individual motivation system is needed. For example: Many of the students (>3) in your class misbehave (e.g., noncompliance, work completion, lack of respect, etc.). Your students are mostly responsible, but quite a few students have a problem with one specific behavior. Your students are responsible, but are apathetic, bored, or complaining.

94. Classwide Motivation Systems First step: Decide on a reward-based system or a non-reward based system.

95. Classwide Motivation Systems Consider a non-reward system for students who are highly motivated, but could use some structure to keep striving towards their goals. Examples of non-reward based systems: Goal setting Self-monitoring/Self Evaluation See p. 341 for a list of systems that are appropriate for classrooms that need high, medium or low structure.

96. Classwide Motivation Systems Common concerns about rewards Q: Shouldn’t students work without needing rewards? Q: Isn’t rewarding behavior the same as bribery?

97. Classwide Motivation Systems Common concerns about rewards (continued) Q: Won’t students get hooked on rewards? Q: Isn’t intrinsic motivation better?

98. Classwide Motivation Systems Common concerns about rewards (continued) Q: Won’t giving students rewards reduce their intrinsic motivation?

99. Classwide Motivation Systems Tips for effectively choosing, designing and implementing a reward-based system: Make sure the rewards are highly motivating by using a reinforcer menu or survey. Set the system up to make student success likely. Make sure your expectations are clear. Teach the students how the system works.

100. Classwide Motivation Systems Tips for effectively maintaining a reward-based system: Keep your energy and enthusiasm high and keep your focus on the students’ behavior rather than the rewards. Continue using other motivational strategies at a high level. When a system has been successful for a period of time, start making it more challenging and/or modify it to be based on intermittent rewards.

101. Classwide Motivation Systems Strategies to effectively fade a reward-based system: Move from a continuous schedule to an intermittent schedule of reward. Delay rewards (consider increasing the reward value to help prevent a lack of enthusiasm) E.g., move from a sticker at the end of the day to a popcorn party at the end of the week. Reduce reward value and increase use of more natural rewards and motivation strategies.

102. Classwide Motivation Systems Strategies to effectively fade a reward-based system (continued): Switch from a class-wide system to an individual system. Switch to a non-reward system such as goal setting and self-monitoring. Note: Be sure to inform the students about the goal to fade the reward-based system.

103. Classwide Motivation Systems Examples of reward-based systems in CHAMPs text: 100 Squares (medium structure, K-12) Behavioral Grading (high structure, MS/HS) Economic Simulation (high structure, 2-8) Goal Setting/Goal Contract (low structure, but can be adapted for medium or high structure) Group Response Cost (medium structure) Lottery Tickets (medium structure)

104. Classwide Motivation Systems Examples of reward-based systems in CHAMPs text (continued): Mystery Behavior of the Day (medium structure) Classwide Public Posting (medium structure) Individual Public Posting (medium structure) Reinforcement Based on Reducing Misbehavior (high structure) Self-Evaluation of On/Off-Task Behavior (medium structure)

105. Classwide Motivation Systems Examples of reward-based systems in CHAMPs text (continued): Target and Reward a Specific Behavior (medium structure) Mystery Motivator (medium structure) Team Competition with Response Cost Lottery (medium structure) Whole Class Points (high structure)

106. Mystery Motivator

107. Feed the Hungry Bee

108. Classwide Motivation Systems A note about group-contingencies: Do not use rewards that are contingent upon the whole group’s performance if you have a student or a small group of students who will sabotage OR if you have a student that will ruin it for the rest of the group due to a skill deficit (a “can’t do” situation). Consider instead rewards based on individual performance or on team performance (Huck Finn is his own team until he can demonstrate teamwork skills).

109. Classwide Motivation Systems Another note: When using structured motivation systems it is imperative that the goals and skills targeted are within the student’s ability UNLESS specialized and organized instruction to address those skill deficits is built in. Reward achievement (or lack thereof) reflects the effectiveness of the instruction, not just student performance.

110. Teaching CHAMPs Tips to Increase Workshop Effectiveness and Implementation Sustainability

111. Teaching CHAMPs Tips to increase training effectiveness: Invite teacher and para-pro teams to attend together Invite multiple teachers from the same district to attend together Invite consultant(s) to attend with teaching teams Provide time for participants to develop the tools

112. Teaching CHAMPs Tips to increase training effectiveness: Provide the training during the summer or at the very beginning of the school year (avoid middle of the year, or late in the school year training times) Provide at least two sessions of training (avoid single day) Engage participants with many activities Bring chocolate!

113. Teaching CHAMPs: Formats Recommended training formats: Two-day workshop during the summer Two days allows time for hands-on activities and information sharing among participants. Previous participants have expressed preference for a two-day or multiple session format (versus one-day). This format allows time for teachers to prepare materials needed for implementation prior to the beginning of school.

114. Teaching CHAMPs: Formats One-day workshop in the summer with a one-day follow-up session in late fall This format allows participants to implement the strategies and bring questions and concerns back to the group for feedback and support. Two sessions breaks up implementation into two parts: (1) prevention, and (2) correction, which is more manageable in terms of implementation.

115. Teaching CHAMPs: Formats CHAMPs “class” (half-day sessions organized per module) CHAMPs was originally designed for a college course in which training was presented one module at a time. This format allows participants to implement strategies systematically and slowly and receive feedback and support from the group.

116. Teaching CHAMPs: Formats Book study (reading assignments with multiple, 1 hour group discussion sessions) Meeting time is focused on discussions regarding how each participant plans to implement the strategies presented. This format may be more manageable in terms of time away from the classroom. The CHAMPs text is easy to read and lends itself to group discussion. Reading assignment during “off hours” cuts down on meeting time.

117. Teaching CHAMPs Tips to increase sustainability: Provide ongoing opportunities to discuss and troubleshoot CHAMPs implementation Teacher to teacher Teacher to coach/consultant Teacher to parapro Systematically use the data collection tools to provide implementation feedback (see Module 6: Monitor & Revise)

118. CHAMPs A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Recommended Intervention Resources

119. Intervention Resources to Fill Your Toolbox Good Books: Behavior Intervention Planning: Using the Functional Behavioral Assessment Data (Scott, Liaupsin, & Nelson) Available from Sopris West. Best Practices: Behavioral and Educational Strategies for Teachers (Reavis, et al.) Available from Sopris West. Communication-Based Intervention for Problem Behavior (Carr, Levin, McConnachie, Carlson, Kemp, & Smith) Available from Brookes Publishing Company. How to Manage Behavior Series (Hall & Hall) Available from Pro-ed.

120. Intervention Resources to Fill Your Toolbox Good Books (continued): Interventions: Collaborative Planning for Students at Risk (Sprick, Sprick & Garrison) Available from Sopris West. Skillstreaming in Early Childhood (McGinnis & Goldstein) Available from Research Press. Skillstreaming the Elementary School Child (McGinnis & Goldstein) Available from Research Press. Skillstreaming the Adolescent (Goldstein & McGinnis) Available from Research Press. Strategies & Tactics for Effective Instruction (Algozzine, Ysseldyke, & Elliott) Available from Sopris West.

121. Intervention Resources to Fill Your Toolbox Good Books (continued): The Teacher’s Encyclopedia of Behavior Management (Sprick & Howard) Available from Sopris West. Teaching Effective Classroom Routines (Witt, LaFleur, Naquin & Gilbertson) Available from Sopris West. Time Savers for Educators (Elliot, Algozzine, & Ysseldyke) Available from Sopris West. The Tough Kid Book: Practical Classroom Management Strategies (Rhode, Jenson & Reavis) Available from Sopris West. The Tough Kid Social Skills Book (Sheridan) Available from Sopris West. The Tough Kid Tool Box (Jenson, Rhode & Reavis) Available from Sopris West.

122. Intervention Resources to Fill Your Toolbox Publishers Known for Quality Resources Boys Town Press (800) 282-6657 Brookes Publishing Co. (800) 638-3775 Childswork Childsplay (800) 962-1141 Different Roads to Learning (800) 317-9146 Guilford Press (800) 365-7006 Mindware: Creative Enrichment for School Age Kids (800) 999-0398 Pro-ed Psychological Products (800) 397-7633 Research Press (800) 519-2707 Sopris West (888) 819-7767

123. Intervention Resources to Fill Your Toolbox Kits & Systems: Tough Class Discipline Kit (McNeil) Classroom Management: The California Resource Guide (it’s free! just email [email protected]) Web-based Resources: www.interventioncentral.org www.behavioradvisor.com

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