Computable elastic distances between shapes laurent younes
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Computable Elastic Distances Between Shapes LAURENT YOUNES. Presented by Kexue Liu 11/28/00. Overview. Introduction Comparison of plane curves Definition of distances with invariance restrictions The Case of closed curves Experiments. Introduction.

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Computable elastic distances between shapes laurent younes

Computable Elastic Distances Between ShapesLAURENT YOUNES

Presented by Kexue Liu

11/28/00


Overview

Overview

  • Introduction

  • Comparison of plane curves

  • Definition of distances with invariance restrictions

  • The Case of closed curves

  • Experiments


Introduction

Introduction

  • Why need measure distances between shapes?

    Human eyes can easily figure out the differences and similarities between shapes, but in computer vision and recognition, need some measurements(distance!)

  • The definition of the distance is crucial.

  • Base the comparison on the whole outline, considered as a plane curve.

  • Related to snakes: Active contour model .

  • Minimal energy required to deform one curve into another!

    It is formally defined from a left invariant Riemannian distance on an infinite dimensional group acting on the curves, which can be explicitly,easily computed.


Introduction principles of the approach

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

  • From group action cost to deformation cost (distance between two curves)

  • From distance on Gto group action cost

  • A suitable distance onG :which corresponds the energy to transform one curve to another.


Introduction principles of the approach1

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

From group action cost to deformation cost

  • C : the object space, each object in it can be deformed into another.

  • The deformation is represented by a group action

    G x C-> C , (a,C)->a.C on C

    i.e. for all a,b  G, C  C, a.(b.C)=(ab).C, e.C=C

  • Transitive : forallC1, C2  C, there existaG, s.t a.C1=C2 .

  • (a,C) : the cost of the transformation C->a.C

    (1) d(C1, C2 ) = inf (a,C1) , C2 = a.C1,

    the smallest cost required to deform C1 to C2


Introduction principles of the approach2

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

  • Proposition 1:Assume G acts transitively on C and that  is a function defined on G x C , taking values in [0,+[, s.t.

    i) for all CC, (e,C)=0.

    ii) for all aG, CC, (a, C)=(a-1,a.C)

    iii) for all a,bG, CC, a.C1=C2 ,(ab,C)(b,C)+(a,b.C)

    then d defined by (1) is symmetric, satisfies the triangle

    inequality, and is such that d(C,C)=0 for C C


Introduction principles of the approach3

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

From distance on Gto group action cost

  • From elementary group theory, C can be identified to a coset

    space on G, fix C0 C, H0={h G, h.C0= C0}, C can be identified to G/H0 through the well-defined correspondence a.H0  a.C0

    Proposition 2:Let dG be a distance on G. Assume that there exists : G s.t (h)=1 if hH0 and ,for all a, b, c G ,

    (2) dG (ca, cb)= (c)dG (a, b)

    For C C, with C=b.C0

    (3) (a, C)=dG (e, a-1)/(b)

    then  satisfies i), ii), iii) of proposition 1. The obtained distance is, d(C, C’)= (b)-1inf dG (e, a), aC’= C, where C=b.C0


Introduction principles of the approach4

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

A suitable distance onG .

  • If a = (a(t), t[0,1]) is such a path subject to suitable regularity conditions, we define the length L(a) and then set dG(a0,a1)=inf{L(a),a(0)=a0,a(1)=a1}

    the infimum being computed over some set of admissible paths, dG is symmetrical and satisfies the triangle inequality.

    • If a(t), t[0,1] is admissible, so is a(1-t), t[0,1] and they have the same length.

    • If a(.) andã(.) are admissible, so is their concatenation, equal to a(2t) fort[0,1/2] and to ã(2t-1) fort[1/2,1] and thelength of the concatenation is the sum of the lengths.


Introduction principles of the approach5

IntroductionPrinciples of the approach

  • We define the length of the path by the formula

  • For some norm. Thinking of as a way to represent the

    portion of path between a(t) and a(t+dt), defining a norm

    corresponds to defining the cost of a small variation of a(t). We

    must have

    dG(a(t),a(t+dt))= (a(t)) dG(e, a(t)-1a(t+dt))

    so the problem is to define  and the cost of a small variation

    from the identity.


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

Energy Functional

  • C = {m(s)=(x(s),y(s)), s[0,] }

    The parametrization is done by arc-length, so we have:

    V(s)={u(s),v(s) } considered as a vector starting at the point m(s)

    = { (s)=(x(s)+ u(s),y(s)+ v(s)}

    The field V (and its derivatives) is infinitely small.

    We define the energy of this deformation is :

    which associates s with the arc length

    in of the point m(s)+V(s)


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations1

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

  • At order one, we have:

    (5)

  • Denote the angle between tangent to C at point m(s) and the x-axis. Let be the similar function defined for ,we have and(at order one)

  • Let , it is the normal component of.

    at order one, we may write


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations2

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

hence,

(6)

  • Set

  • Set


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations3

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

  • Taking the first order, we have:

  • The functional involves some action on the curve C,

  • Define , it is a function from [0,1] to the unit circle of (denote it as 1), then we may represent our set of objects as:

  • (7) C={( ,) , >0, :[0,1]->1,measurable},  is translation and scale invariant.


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations4

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

  • The transformation which can naturally be associated to ,g,D:

  • Define the action:

    (9) (,g,r).(,)=( ,r. g)

    where  > 0, g is a diffeomorphism of [0,1] and r is a measurable function, defined on[0,1] and with values in 1.

  • Let G be the set composed with these 3-uples, it is embedded product

    (10) (1,g1,r1).(2,g2,r2)=(12,g2 g1,r1.r2g1)

    with identity eG=(1,Id,1) and inverse (-1,g-1, řg-1), řis the complex conjugate of r .


Comparison of the plane curves infinitesimal deformations5

Comparison of the plane curvesInfinitesimal deformations

  • If (,g,r) is close to (1,Id,1), then the energy functional is:

  • a = (,g,r) , we evaluate the cost of a small deformation

    C->a-1C by

  • Let C0=(1,1), b=(1/, Id, ), then C = (,)=b.C0

  • With

    (13)

    (14)


Comparison of the plane curves rigorous definition of g

Comparison of the plane curvesRigorous definition of G

  • Consider Hilbert Space:

    with norm:

  • Define

    (15)

  • Product

    (16)

  • It is well defined on

    (17)


Comparison of the plane curves rigorous definition of g1

Comparison of the plane curvesRigorous definition of G

  • Proposition 3

  • Proof:

    (18)

    Let the inverse of , both of them are strictly increasing.

    Let ,then


Comparison of the plane curves rigorous definition of g2

Comparison of the plane curvesRigorous definition of G

thus

  • For

  • Denote the mapping

  • DEFINITION 1: Denote by G the set of 3-uples (,g,r)subject to the conditions:

    1) ]0,+[

    2) g is continuous on [0,1] with values in  and such that

    • g(0)=0, g(1) = 1

    • There exist a function q>0, a.e. on [0,1] such that

      3) r is measurable, r :[0,1] ->1, 1 is the unit circle in 


Comparison of the plane curves rigorous definition of g3

Comparison of the plane curvesRigorous definition of G

  • Proposition 4.

  • Remarks:

    Denoting by  the equivalence relation X2=Y2

    then we can identity G with the quotient space

    The consistency of norm on 2 with formula (14).

    • Y=1+X, a small perturbation of 1 in 2, and assume |X(s)| is small for all s.


Comparison of the plane curves rigorous definition of g4

Comparison of the plane curvesRigorous definition of G

thus is identified for

Furthermore, dG (e,a) for a close to e is theinfimum of

2Y-1over all Y s.t (Y) = a, whichis the quotient distance

on

  • If

    and TXis linear and can be extended to all Y 2 and we have

    this means if , From (13)


Comparison of the plane curves admissible paths in g

Comparison of the plane curvesAdmissible paths in G

  • Definition 2:

    • For all

      is differentiable in the general sense, and the derivative is

    • The total energy is finite:


Comparison of the plane curves admissible paths in g1

Comparison of the plane curvesAdmissible paths in G

  • The length of an admissible path is:

  • If a path is admissible in

    then it is admissible in

  • This definition satisfies the natural properties w.r.t. time reversal and concatenation.


Comparison of the plane curves admissible paths in g2

Comparison of the plane curvesAdmissible paths in G

  • Definition 3: A path a(t), t[0,1] is admissible in G iff there exists a path X(t,.), t[0,1] which is admissible in and such that for all t, (X(t,.))=a(t). We now define the length of a path

    a in G acting on C=(,)(denoted Ll[a]) as 2  times the length

    of a corresponding path in .

  • Proposition 5: If two admissible paths in 2,X(t,.) and Y(t,.), satisfy: X(t,.)2 = Y(t,.)2 for all t, then


Comparison of the plane curves invariant distance associated with g

Comparison of the plane curvesInvariant distance associated with G

  • Compute the distance between two elements in G as the length of the shortest admissible path in G joining them.

  • dG(a,b)=2 Inf{X-Y2 , X,YĞ,(X)=a,(Y)=b }, the Inf is over all the shortest paths in Ğ joining X and Y.

  • Paths of shortest length in 2 are straight lines but if X,Y Ğ , the straight line ttX+(1-t)Y does not necessarily stay within Ğ, however, the length of this straight line is X-Y2 . So we always havedG(a,b)2min{X-Y2 , X,YĞ,(X)=a,(Y)=b }.

  • Equality is true provided the minimum in the right hand term is attainted for some X, Y such that ttX+(1-t)Y stays in Ğ.


Comparison of the plane curves invariant distance associated with g1

Comparison of the plane curvesInvariant distance associated with G

  • Because , the min is attained for

  • Theorem 1: One define a distance on G by


Comparison of the plane curves invariant distance associated with g2

Comparison of the plane curvesInvariant distance associated with G

  • One defines a distance between two plane curves by

    the supremum being taken over functions  which are increasing

    diffeomorphisms of [0,1].


Comparison of the plane curves invariant distance associated with g3

Comparison of the plane curvesInvariant distance associated with G

  • The following lemma guarantee it is a distance!

  • Lemma 1: one has


Distances with invariance restrictions definition of invariant

Distances with invariance restrictionsDefinition of invariant

  • Invariant: A distance d on C is said to be invariant by a group of transformations  acting on C, if for all   , for all C1, C2 ,we have d(C1,C2)= d(C1,C2).

  • Weakly invariant: if there exists a function  q() s.t. for all , C1, C2 , we have d(C1,C2)= q()d(C1,C2).

  • Defined module : If for all , C we have d(C,C)= d(C,C).

    In the literature, the term ‘invariant’ is often used for the last definition.


Distances with invariance restrictions scale invariance

Distances with invariance restrictionsScale invariance

  • By using appropriate energy definition and subspace of 2 , we get a scale invariant distant.

  • Theorem 2: One defines a distance on G by


Distances with invariance restrictions scale invariance1

Distances with invariance restrictionsScale invariance

  • One defines a scale invariant distance between two plane curves by

    the infimum being taken over functions  which are strictly increasing

    diffeomorphisms of [0,1].


Distances with invariance restrictions modulo translations and scales

Distances with invariance restrictionsModulo translations and scales

  • Theorem 3: One defines a distance (modulo translations and scales) between two plane curves with normalized angle functions by:

    the infimum being taken over functions  which are strictly increasing diffeomorphisms of [0,1].


Distances with invariance restrictions modulo similarities

Distances with invariance restrictionsModulo similarities

  • Rotation invariance, the above distance is rotation invariant but not defined modulo rotation. Since rotations merely translate the angle functions.

  • Theorem 4: one defines a distance by


Distances with invariance restrictions modulo similarities1

Distances with invariance restrictionsModulo similarities

  • One defines a distance(modulo similarities) between two plane curves with normalized angle functions by:


Case of closed curves

Case of closed curves

  • Object set consists of all sufficiently smooth plane curves, including closed curves. So the distance we have used need to be valid for comparing closed curves, but modification is required.

  • In case of open cures, there are only two choices for the starting points to parameterize the curves. But in closed curve case, the starting point maybe anywhere.

  • Define u.:[0,1]-> s.t. u.(s)= (s+u).

    for C1=(1,1) and C2=(2,2), dc(C1,C2) =inf d(u.C1,C2)

    where inf is over all u.


Experiments

Experiments

  • Database composed with eight outlines of airplanes for four types of airplanes.

  • The shapes have been extracted from 3- dimentional synthesis images under two slightly different view angles for each airplane.

  • Apply some stochastic noise to the outlines in order to obtain variants of the same shape which look more realistic.

  • The lengths of the curves have been computed after smoothing(using cubic spline representation).


Experiments1

Experiments


Experiments2

Experiments


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