On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture
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On-Demand e-Science Grids based on Adaptive-Mesh Network Architecture. NEP Virtual Organization: - Canadian Light Source Inc. (CLS) - Optimum Communications Services, Inc. (OCS) - TRLabs - CYBERA Mark Sandstrom, President, OCS [email protected]

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On-Demand e-Science Grids based on Adaptive-Mesh Network Architecture

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On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

On-Demand e-Science Grids based on Adaptive-Mesh Network Architecture

NEP Virtual Organization:

- Canadian Light Source Inc. (CLS)

- Optimum Communications Services, Inc. (OCS)

- TRLabs

- CYBERA

Mark Sandstrom, President, OCS

[email protected]


Adaptive mesh for on demand e science grids

Adaptive-Mesh for On-Demand E-Science Grids

  • The goal: To enable dynamic, high-performance and cost-efficient (i.e. practical) location-independent scientific collaboration

  • Pilot applications to connect CLS’ users, CYBERA computing facilities and TRLabs’ member universities via a realtime self-optimizing, self-organizing Adaptive-Mesh grid network

    • Examples of current CLS’ projects demanding bursty, yet high-performance network connectivity:

      • Protein crystallography (CMCF);

      • Materials sciences (VESPERS)

  • Need to dynamically integrate cross-disciplinary virtual labs over WANs

    Need For On-Demand E-Science Grid Networks


The platform

The Platform

  • Applications:

    • CLS, CLS’ users, TRLabs member universities

  • Innovative grid technologies:

    • OCS’ Adaptive-Mesh

    • E.g. UCLP based way to form Adaptive-Mesh groups on-demand

  • Network and computing facilities:

    • TRnet

    • CYBERA (super computing and data storage)


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

Proof of Concept:

Adaptive-Mesh

over TRnet

Adaptive-Mesh networks

can extend to campus

networks and beyond to

frequent (int’l) collaborators

Saskatoon:

- CLS Synchrotron facility

Edmonton

- Univ. of Alberta:

nanotech research

-OCS:

Adaptive-Mesh

remote management

- TRLabs: TRnet

remote management

Adaptive-Mesh grid for remote, on-demand scientific collaboration

Winnipeg

- Univ. of Manitoba:

medical research

with CLS

using high

bandwidth remote

imaging

Calgary

- TRLabs / Univ. of Calgary:

e.g. environmental, geological

research done with CLS

- CYBERA:

super computing facilities

Winnipeg

- TRLabs / Univ. of Regina:

e.g. high bandwidth

remote imaging (new

digital media development)


Cls remote user network requirements

CLS Remote User Network Requirements

  • General characteristics (per CLS):

    • Secure data transfer

    • Real-time performance – Guaranteed QoS

       Public Internet not a feasible network solution

    • Users located at research universities, institutes and customer corporate facilities across Canada and internationally

       Purpose-built networks too inflexible and costly

       Need for a secure, deterministic, flexible and cost-efficient E-Science Grid network


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

Saskatoon

MPLSrouter

1.A

MPLSrouter

1.B

Assume each site has a

pair of mutually protecting

MPLS edge routers

Requirements for the network grid:

1) Provide maximum possible amount of non-blocking, high-availability, direct light path like inter-site connectivity among the five sites using the single 10Gbps wavelength of TRnet.

2) 10Gbps BW on-demand between any two sites.

3) Network connectivity to be provided as a transparent managed service, and must be administration-free for the users!

Rationale:

The network must enable transparent, on demand scientific collaboration, instead of requiring the users to spend resources on network administration

Edmonton

Winnipeg

MPLSrouter

5.B

MPLSrouter

2.A

MPLSrouter

5.B

MPLSrouter

2.B

Calgary

Regina

MPLSrouter

4.B

MPLSrouter

4.A

MPLSrouter

3.B

MPLSrouter

3.A


Network implementation approaches

Network Implementation Approaches:

  • Packet ring (routers/switches directly on the 10Gbps ring):

    • Hop count between access sites up to 4

    • Unrelated traffic streams competing for the same capacity

       Traffic that will not even get through on time can block other traffic

       Non-deterministic performance, potentially high latencies and packet loss rate, causing low actual efficiency

  • Hub and spoke:

    • Requires core L2/3 switches/routers, which need to be configured by a 3rd party service provider, and are not transparent

       Not an administration-free, transparent network as required

    • Requires 10 SONET ADMs in addition to the 2 core L2/L3 switches/routers  in practice also cost prohibitive

  • Adaptive-Mesh:

    • 4xOC-48 access per site, totaling 50Gbps, possible with 10 OCS’ ITN nodes

      • No core routers/switches and no ADMs

      • Transparent packet forwarding controlled directly by customer’s edge routers


Preferred network implementation

Preferred Network Implementation

  • Packet ring or hub-and-spoke cannot even in theory provide any more access capacity than Adaptive-Mesh (i.e. 50Gbps on the 10Gbps) ring

  • The architectural advantages of Adaptive-Mesh, i.e., maximized throughput with deterministic performance and built-in security, will become even more compelling when building larger on-demand e-science grids

     Proposal to trial Adaptive-Mesh on TRnet, to dynamically connect TRLabs’ member universities and CLS as a pilot project of the architecture

     After such a successful pilot, Adaptive-Mesh should be considered also for wider deployment on research network backbones

     These concepts of flexible, cost-efficient, high-performance and secure on-demand grids (and grids of grids) can form the basis of the Future Internet


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

Adaptive-Mesh Grid

over TRnet

Implementation

Architecture

Saskatoon

MPLSrouter

1.A

MPLSrouter

1.B

ITN IF Modules

IM

“1.A”

IM

“1.B”

ITN Adaptive-Mesh provides

direct Layer 1 circuits (of adaptive bandwidth)

between each pair of “A” IMs, as well as “B” IMs,

with only one instance of packet-forwarding

between the MPLS router interfaces

See next slide for network ring capacity requirements of

an Adaptive-Mesh, e.g. between the “A” IMs

of this network 

Edmonton

Winnipeg

MPLSrouter

5.B

IM

“5.B”

IM

“2.A”

MPLSrouter

2.A

MPLSrouter

5.A

IM

“5.A”

IM

“2.B”

MPLSrouter

2.B

Single 10G wavelength ring sufficient for

the twenty 2.5G (OC-48c) access points i.e. 50 Gbps of

MPLS packet-switched access capacity

IM

“4.B”

IM

“3.A”

MPLS over

OC-48c

IM

“4.A”

IM

“3.B”

Calgary

Regina

MPLSrouter

4.B

MPLSrouter

4.A

MPLSrouter

3.B

MPLSrouter

3.A


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

IM

1

All ITN IF Modules (IMs) able to map packets on all AMBs passing by them; an AMB carries packets to its destination IM from all source IMs along them.

Each Adaptive-Concatenation Mux Bus

(AMB) capacity MxSTS-1

WDM/SONET cloud

West AMB to IM 1

East AMB to IM 1

West AMB

to IM 2

East AMB

to IM 5

IM

5

IM

2

As many AMBs as there are IMs

in the local ring-half, i.e. (N-1)/2 AMBs for N-node full-mesh, needed in each ring direction. In this case, N=5 and thus (5-1)/2 = 2 AMBs

needed per ring direction.

Thus, protected, non-blocking full-mesh using AMBs among N nodes with MxSTS-1 worth of IF capacity to the network per node, requires [(N-1)/2]xSTS-M

of ring capacity.

For example, [(5-1)/2]xSTS-48=2xSTS-48

 two 5-node 2xSTS-48 rate A-Ms possible

over STS-192 ring.

East AMB

to IM 2

West AMB

to IM 5

Each IM interfaces with a customer router, or IM of another Adaptive-Mesh, over a pair of PPP links, each with nominal capacity of MxSTS-1, e.g. OC-48c for M=48.

West AMB to

IM 3

East AMB

to IM 4

IM

3

East AMB to IM 3

West AMB to IM 4

MPLS LER

(site 4)

IM

4


Adaptive mesh demo

Adaptive-Mesh Demo

The World’s First, Realtime

Self-Optimizing, Self-Organizing

Network In Action...

Geoff Kliza, VP Operations, OCS

[email protected]


Double amb test network configuration

Double AMB Test Network Configuration

  • 5 ITN nodes on OC-48 ring

  • Test requires 2 x OC-12 AMBs:

    • Nodes # 1, 2, 3 and 4 are sources to Node #5

  • The AMB under test carries traffic generated by Port 1 and Port 2 of Agilent N2X tester


Test setup

Test Setup

  • Since Adaptive-Mesh architecture of ITN is formed of multiple similar, though independently operating AMBs, only a single AMB needs to be tested to fully characterize ITN Adaptive-Mesh

  • Agilent N2X MPLS router tester provides priority and bulk traffic of random packet sizes from 64-1500 bytes

  • Each of the four source-destination traffic streams periodically peaks up to 100% of the OC-12c link capacity

  • AMB bandwidth allocation among the sources continuously optimized to maintain maximum usage of destination egress capacity

  • Direct circuit like QoS is maintained even at 100% traffic loads


Adaptive mesh for on demand e science grids and the future internet

Adaptive-Mesh for On-Demand E-Science Grids... and the Future Internet

  • Network to enable, instead of restrict, on-demand scientific collaboration:

    • Dynamic access and sharing of scientific, computing, storage etc. facilities

       The more broadly Adaptive-Mesh is deployed in network backbones, the more practical and cost-efficient worldwide e-Science becomes

  • A need to dynamically configure Adaptive-Mesh groups among sites with higher mutual network throughput requirements, e.g. based on UCLP

  • The longer-term vision:

    Internet like flexibility and reach, with direct light path like performance


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

We look forward to working with you!

Optimum Communications Services, Inc.

www.optimumzone.net


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

Context - Connectivity Requirements for Core Network

Content site /

Data center

SAN

All MPLS backbone network access points interconnected as if through a dedicated point-to-point L1/0 connections to the doubled core MPLS switches dedicated for the mobile operator

. . .

. . .

PSTN

LER

LER

LER/

MGW

Internet

LER/

BGR

PSTN

.

.

.

Core

MPLS

switch (A)

Core

MPLS

switch (B)

Virtual core routers/switches

transparently interconnecting all the LERs

MGW

Internet

LER

BGR

.

.

.

Wireless access

LER

Doubled MPLS over OC-Nc or 1/10GbE per site

LER

Wireless access

LER

. . .

Wireless access

LER

LER

LER

LER

LER

LER

Wireless access

Wireless access

Wireless access

MPLS routers at the customer switching centers/content sites/Internet/PSTN access points etc.

BGR = Border Gateway Router (with firewalls)

LER = Label Edge Router

MGW = Media (PSTN<>VoIP) Gateway


On demand e science grids based on adaptive mesh network architecture

Implementation of Connectivity Requirements Using OCS’ITN Adaptive-Mesh

Wireless access

Wireless access

Content site / Data center

SAN

Wireless access

. . .

LER

LER

. . .

.

.

.

PSTN

LER

LER

LER

.

.

.

IM

IM

LER/

MGW

7-site 2xSTS-N-rate

Adaptive-Mesh

over OC-4N ring

IM

IM

IM

IM

IM

Internet

Doubled 5-site STS-N-rate Adaptive-Mesh over

OC-4N ring; interconnects the four regional Adaptive-Mesh

networks and the PSTN/Internet access points

See next slide 

LER/

BGR

IM

IM

IM

IM

PSTN

.

.

.

MGW

IM

IM

IM

Internet

IM

1+1 Protected,

Link-aggregated

MPLS over STS-Nc PPP links

LER

LER

BGR

IM

IM

IM

7-site

2xSTS-N inter-site rate

Adaptive-Mesh

over OC-4N ring

.

.

.

IM

IM

7-site

2xSTS-N inter-site rate

Adaptive-Mesh

over OC-4N ring

Wireless access

IM

.

.

.

LER

LER

IM

IM

Doubled MPLS over OC-Nc or 1/10GbE per site

IM

IM

IM

IM

LER

LER

IM

IM

Wireless access

LER

. . .

Wireless access

LER

LER

LER

LER

LER

LER

Wireless access

Wireless access

Wireless access

MPLS routers at the customer switching centers/content sites/Internet/PSTN access points etc.

BGR = Border Gateway Router (with firewalls)

LER = Label Edge Router

MGW = Media (PSTN<>VoIP) Gateway

IM = OCS’ Intelligent Transport Network™ IF module


Adaptive mesh for on demand e science grids1

Adaptive-Mesh for On-Demand E-Science Grids

Summary:

  • Customer controllable, packet-layer transparent network service

  • Packet transport using circuits of dynamically optimized bandwidth

  • Maximized data throughput based on realtime traffic load patterns

Adaptive-Mesh Network Service:

User groups’ private multi-service backbone -- just without the need for the users

to spend capital or resources on deploying or operating their backbonenetwork


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