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Mentoring
Mentoring

I’ll be your Mentor

A black figure sitting on a brown block

Two hands holding the Earth.


Instruction
Instruction

  • The menu bar above will take you directly to other sections

  • Please use the “Back, Return, Home, and Forward” buttons at the bottom left corner or the keyboard arrows to navigate throughout this module

  • Please be aware that some animations may take a few seconds to self-activate.

Two black figures shaking hands


Mentoring1

Resources

Mentoring

Components

Exercises

Overview

Model

A figure holding a banner that says “Mentoring”


Goals
Goals

  • To discuss mentoring history and general concepts.

  • To provide information about mentoring in general in postsecondary education.

  • To provide information about mentoring related to individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education.

  • To offer suggestions for using mentoring related to individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education.

  • To share exercises to be used to facilitate mentoring in postsecondary education.

An archer shooting an arrow


Objectives
Objectives

  • To understand fundamental mentoring concepts.

  • To understand why mentoring is important for students with disabilities in postsecondary education.

  • To learn why faculty may benefit from being mentored by students with disabilities.

A baseball player catching a ball


Evaluation
Evaluation

You can evaluate this module by clicking on the following link Click Here

A figure holding a sheet


Menu

Click on the appropriate box to go to that section

Components

Eight colorful folders linked to different sections


The history of mentoring
The History of Mentoring

  • Mentoring, both conceptually and in practice, is ancient.

  • Greek author Homer described Odysseus leaving for battle and requesting his friend Mentor to guide and protect his son in his absence.

  • Since the 20th Century when organizations such as the Big Brothers, Big Sisters and 12-step programs were popularized, mentors models have proliferated.

Ancient mentoring

A black figure mentoring a Romanian person


What is mentoring
What is Mentoring?

Mentoring is a dynamic, reciprocal, long-term formal, or informal, relationship that focuses on personal and/or professional development. A mentor is a sounding board and guide. Mentors provide perspective, resources, and ask thought-provoking questions. In the ideal mentoring relationship, mentors and mentees or protégés learn and teach each other.

Two black figures shaking

hands

Brown, S. E.,Takahashi, K., and Roberts, K. D. (2010). Mentoring individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education: A review of the literature,” Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 23(2), 98-111.


Why mentoring is important
Why Mentoring is Important

Connecting

Thriving

Learning

Leading

Working

A black figure with a question mark over his head

Hare, R. (2008). Plotting the course for Success: An Individualized Mentoring Plan for youth with disabilities. Washington, D.C: National Consortium on Leadership and Disability for Youth, Institute for Educational Leadership.


The importance of mentoring in postsecondary education
The Importance of Mentoring in Postsecondary Education

  • Helps to develop relationships with professors

  • Assist in the alliance with peers

  • Helps to develop a support system

A graduate receiving a diploma from the dean


Why is mentoring important for faculty and students with disabilities
Why is mentoring Important for Faculty and Students with Disabilities?

All are a hole in one!!!

Click on the black holes to see the benefits. (Left to right)

Promotes inclusion

Retention of students

Friendships

Promotes accessibility

Creates inclusive environments

Matriculation for students with disabilities

Increases the knowledge, skills and awareness of faculty members related to disability issues

Students with disabilities are both mentees mentors

Transfer skill sets to other areas

A black figure juggling red balls


Benefits continued
Benefits Continued... Disabilities?

A black figure holding an umbrella to protect himself and his puppy

  • Common Reported Benefits of Mentees:

  • Better attitudes towards school and future

  • Decreased likelihood of initiating drug and alcohol use (dual diagnosis)

  • Great feelings of academic competence

  • Improved academic performance

  • More positive relationships with friends and family

  • (Campbell-Whatley, 2001)

  • Benefits of Mentoring students with disabilities:

  • Increased self-esteem

  • Feelings of accomplishment

  • Insight into childhood and adolescence

  • Personal gain, such as increased patience, a sense of effectiveness, and acquiring new skills or knowledge

  • (Rhodes et al, 2000)

Campbell-Whatley, G. (2001). Mentoring students with mild disabilities: The “nuts and bolts” of program development. Intervention in School and Clinic, (36) 211-216.

Rhodes, J. E., Grossman, J. B., & Resch, N. L. (2000). Agents of change: Pathways through which mentoring relationships influence adolescents" academic adjustment. Child Development, 71, 1662-1671.


Why mentoring is important for faculty and students with disabilities cont d
Why Mentoring is Important for Faculty and Students with Disabilities (Cont’d)

Mentoring can be an essential component of higher education --Many students, especially students with disabilities, need mentors, who may also be role models with disabilities themselves, to:

1) Believe that they too can be successful in a potentially difficult environment;

2) Learn skills to succeed in the

postsecondary environment.

A black figure holding the disability logo


Why mentoring is important for faculty and students with disabilities cont d1
Why Mentoring is Important for Faculty and Students with Disabilities (Cont’d)

Students provide insight into the disability experience within and outside of postsecondary education--Students with disabilities are often the experts in their own disabilities and how it affects them so they can become mentors to faculty who often know much less about disability.

A black figure holding the disability logo


Types of mentoring

One-to-one mentoring Disabilities (Cont’d)

Types of Mentoring

Phone

Electronic

One-to-one mentoring

Email

Group mentoring

Different Types

Face-to-face

Peer

Community-based mentoring

Group mentoring

Mentoring

A piece of art showing two persons trying to hold each other’s hands

A black figure lecturing in front of five other black figures


Mentoring2

Resources Disabilities (Cont’d)

Mentoring

Components

Exercises

Overview

Model

A figure holding a banner that says “Mentoring”


Mentoring model
Mentoring Model Disabilities (Cont’d)

.

black figure holding a magnifying glass

Brown, S. E.,Takahashi, K., and Roberts, K. D. (2010). Mentoring individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education: A review of the literature,” Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 23(2), 98-111.


How the model applies
How the Model Applies Disabilities (Cont’d)

Mentor

Mentee

A black figure holding a mentor sign

A black figure sitting on a blue box with a question mark over his head


What do we know about mentoring in postsecondary education
What Do We Know About Mentoring in Postsecondary Education? Disabilities (Cont’d)

Faculty mentoring may be a valuable resource to students through:

  • Dynamic, reciprocal and/or professional development

  • A sounding board and guide

  • Mentors provide a perspective, resources, while asking thought provoking questions

  • Mentors/mentees learn from one another

A black figure holding a book


What have we learned about faculty student mentoring
What Have We Learned About Faculty-Student Mentoring? Disabilities (Cont’d)

  • Students with disabilities are both mentees of faculty in areas of the faculty’s expertise and mentors to faculty in areas about disability.

  • Sharing perspectives. Communicating and interacting are the essence of the mentoring relationship.

48

A black figure teaching two students, one of them is a student using a wheelchair


Common student faculty mentoring activities
Common Student/Faculty Mentoring Activities Disabilities (Cont’d)

When the picture appears, click for more details

Attending student’s graduation, meeting family and friends.

Assisting with questions about University policies and campus resources/services

Meeting to discuss academics, major selection, career goals, graduate schools, and personal matters.

A gradate using a wheelchair

A boss talking to one of the employees

A university building

Attending professional meetings with student mentees and holding discussion groups.

Participating in student life and development, student leadership and special events.

Activities

A group of people talking

A blind woman walking with her assistive dog

Reviewing resumes, scholarship applications and preparing for internship interviews.

Preparing and presenting at conferences.

On campus lunches or coffee breaks.

People in a presentation

Two persons reviewing a paper

(Partners for Success, California State University @ Long Beach)

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/students/partners/mentors/activities.html

A hand holding a cup of coffee


Mentoring3
Mentoring Disabilities (Cont’d)

Supports

Best Practices

Framework

  • Helps both faculty & students work together better

  • reduces barriers in both academic & extra-curricular activities

  • proactively meets the needs of diverse learners

A black figure sitting on a brown block

A teacher helping students to read

Three Cheerleaders

A student using a wheelchair talking to a blind student


Things to consider when mentoring students with disabilities
Things to consider when mentoring Students Disabilities (Cont’d) With Disabilities

  • A mentor should always locate an accessible place in which to meet

  • A mentee with a health condition may tire easily and need a flexible schedule, i.e., accommodate by planning a morning meeting rather than afternoon because the mentee tires later in the day

  • A specific time to eat and a special menu because they for example have diabetes


Things to consider when mentoring students with disabilities1
Things to consider when mentoring Students Disabilities (Cont’d) With Disabilities

  • A mentee with a physical disability may have challenges with transportation and, as a result, be late for mentoring meetings

  • The mentee who is deaf or hard of hearing will likely need an interpreter or assistive technology at mentor meetings

  • A mentee with a hidden disability such as a learning disability. ADD or ADHD may appear overwhelmed and confused at times. Be patient!


Recommendations
Recommendations Disabilities (Cont’d)

  • Be open to working with students with disabilities.

  • Keep in mind that good mentor/mentee relationships do not happen overnight.

  • Open communication is important.

  • Mentor/mentees need to develop the best way to work together.

  • Seek opportunities to maintain contact.

  • Both mentee and mentor discuss expectations, so they are in agreement about what to expect from the mentoring relationship.

A black figure playing chess


Mentoring4

Resources Disabilities (Cont’d)

Mentoring

Components

Exercises

Overview

Model

A figure holding a banner that says “Mentoring”


Components of a successful mentoring relationship
Components of a Successful Mentoring Relationship Disabilities (Cont’d)

Reciprocity

Technology

  • Mentor and mentee both learn from the experience.

  • Using computer and networking technologies for electronic, or e-mentoring.

Informality

Socializing

Longevity

  • Mentors/mentees develop a casual, or informal, relationship, even if it begins as a formal mentoring relationship

A black figure sitting on a brown block

  • Drinking coffee, socializing, spending time together in non-academic ways.

  • Mentors and mentees are together for longer than a year.

Foster Heckman, E., Brown, S. E., & Roberts, K. D. (Fall 2007). Mentoring Partnership Project: Exploring mentoring practices for students with disabilities in postsecondary education. HEATH Resource Center Newsletter. George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from http://www.ist.hawaii.edu/products/


Components of a successful mentoring relationship1
Components of a Successful Mentoring Relationship Disabilities (Cont’d)

Collaboration

Communication

Commitment

Transferable

  • Cooperation, such as exploring scholarly research writing, and presentations together.

  • Face-to-face meetings, emails, and phone conferences.

  • Mentors and mentees make a long-term commitment (generally at least a year).

  • Faculty and student mentoring relationship evolve over time. Relationships may continue after a student graduates. Mentoring relationships are fluid and can take a different shape overtime.

A black figure sitting on a brown block

Foster Heckman, E., Brown, S. E., & Roberts, K. D. (Fall 2007). Mentoring Partnership Project: Exploring mentoring practices for students with disabilities in postsecondary education. HEATH Resource Center Newsletter. George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from http://www.ist.hawaii.edu/products/


Mentoring5

Resources Disabilities (Cont’d)

Mentoring

Components

Exercises

Overview

Model

A figure holding a banner that says “Mentoring”


Exercises
Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

  • Exercise #1: Mentors in your Life

  • (can be conducted with a group or individually)

  • Have you had mentors?

  • If so, think about some of your mentors

    • What did you like best about the mentoring relationship?

    • Was there something about the mentoring relationship you didn’t like?

    • What, if anything, would you have changed?

    • If you haven’t had mentors, what would you like from a mentor?

  • Think of one experience or story from one mentoring relationship you’d be willing to share with the group to describe something you really liked about your mentoring relationship.

  • A black figure standing with a light bulb over his head.


    Exercises1
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Exercise #2: Forced Choices (this is a group exercise)

    Instruction:

    Ask everyone if they are comfortable standing or going to a part of the room where there is some space. Tell participants you are going to ask a series of questions and they will be given a couple of seconds to make a decision and go to one side of the room or the other. There is no middle-ground and no questions.

    Purpose of this exercise:

    To react to the choices- forced choices- rather than give participants time to think them through. They can be modified to your own situations.

    A black figure standing with a light bulb over his head.

    32


    Exercises2
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Exercise #2: Forced Choices (this is a group exercise)

    After the exercise:

    Discuss what happened in the context of individuals with disabilities. Many times, people with disabilities are forced to make choices, or have choices forced on them, that are not ideal. This may also apply to mentees with disabilities, hence the purpose of the exercise is for mentors to understand that what is going on in the life of a student with a disability may be more impactful than what is happening in the classroom or in his or her studies.

    A black figure standing with a light bulb over his head.

    33


    Exercises3
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    • Exercise #2: Forced Choices (Continued)

    • Would you rather:

    • Have AIDS or Alzheimer's?

    • Have autism or mental illness?

    • Be rich and poor health or poor and healthy?

    • Be at home with parents or in a group home with supervision?

    • Read print or listen to a book?

    • Go to a movie theater or watch a DVD?

    A black figure standing


    Exercises4
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    • Exercise #2: Forced Choices (Continued)

    • Would you rather:

    • Be a mentor or a mentee?

    • Talk on the phone or email?

    • Spend time on a social networking site or go to the beach?

    • Teach lecture classes or seminars?

    • Be in a formal or informal mentoring relationship?

    • Get together with a student in your office or at a coffee shop?

    A black figure standing


    Exercises5
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    • Exercise #3: Mentoring Relationships

    • (can be conducted with a group or individually)

    • Describe a mentoring relationship (as mentee and/or mentor) that you have had in the postsecondary environment where diversity was a key component of the relationship.

    • Were you the mentor, mentee or both?

    • Was this a formal or informal relationship and how did it start (i.e. were you participating in a mentoring program or did the relationship just evolve)?

    • Did the issue of diversity and/or disability enter into the relationship?

    A black figure standing with a light bulb over his head.


    Exercises6
    Exercises Disabilities (Cont’d)

    • Exercise #3: Mentoring Relationships (Continued)

      • 4. What did you learn from the relationship?

      • 5. What did you bring to the relationship?

      • 6. What were the challenges and successes of maintaining the mentoring relationship?

      • 7. How did you maintain the relationship over time?

      • 8. What did this mentoring relationship mean to you in the long term?

      • 9. How did your mentoring relationship evolve over time i.e., (instructor, advisor, supervisor, mentor, friend).

    A black figure standing


    Evaluation1
    Evaluation Disabilities (Cont’d)

    You can evaluate this module by clicking on the following link Click Here

    A figure holding a sheet


    Mentoring6

    Resources Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Mentoring

    Components

    Exercises

    Overview

    Model

    A figure holding a banner that says “Mentoring”


    Resources
    Resources Disabilities (Cont’d)

    • American Association of People with Disabilities

      (AAPD): http://www.aapd.com/

    • Association of Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD): http://ahead.org/

    • DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology): http://www.washington.edu/doit/

    • STRIDE (Successful Transitions in Diverse Environments) Hawai‘i: http://www.hawaii.edu/stride/

    A black figure reading a book in a library


    References
    References Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Brown, S. E.,Takahashi, K., and Roberts, K. D. (2010). Mentoring individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education: A review of the literature,” Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 23(2), 98-111.

    Campbell-Whatley, G. (2001). Mentoring students with mild disabilities: The “nuts and bolts” of program development. Intervention in School and Clinic, (36) 211-216.

    Foster Heckman, E., Brown, S. E., & Roberts, K. D. (Fall 2007). Mentoring Partnership Project: Exploring mentoring practices for students with disabilities in postsecondary education. HEATH Resource Center Newsletter. George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Retrieved from http://www.ist.hawaii.edu/products/

    A black figure carrying a stack of books


    References1
    References Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Hare, R. (2008). Plotting the course for Success: An Individualized Mentoring Plan for youth with disabilities. Washington, D.C: National Consortium on Leadership and Disability for Youth, Institute for Educational Leadership.

    Rhodes, J. E., Grossman, J. B., & Resch, N. L. (2000). Agents of change: Pathways through which mentoring relationships influence adolescents" academic adjustment. Child Development, 71, 1662-1671.

    A black figure carrying a stack of books


    For more information contact
    For More Information, Contact: Disabilities (Cont’d)

    Project Coordinators

    Steven E. Brown, Ph.D.

    [email protected]

    Megan Conway, Ph.D.

    [email protected]

    Project Coordinators

    Teaching all Students, Reaching all Learners

    Website address: www.ist.hawaii.edu

    A picture of Dr. Steven Brown

    A picture of Dr. Megan Conway

    A black figure walking on a red carpet


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