Adjective
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A word that describes a noun, e.g. a big house, a cold morning. Adjective. A word that describes a verb, e.g. run quickly , dance happily . Adverb. The words the , a or an which go before a noun. Article.

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Adjective

A word that describes a noun, e.g. a big house,

a cold morning.

Adjective


Adverb

A word that describes a verb,

e.g. run quickly, dance happily.

Adverb


Article

The words the, a or an which go before a noun.

Article



Conjunction

A word that joins two clauses or sentences, e.g. something doing the action.and, but, so.

Conjunction



Main clause1

e.g. own.I went out even though it was raining.

I went out is the main clause because it makes sense on its own.

Main clause




Phrase

A small part of a sentence, usually without a verb, Wales.

e.g. I have met many famous pop stars.

Phrase



Preposition

A word that tells you how things are related, e.g. meaning, e.g. unlock.in, above, before.

Preposition


Pronoun

Words that can be used instead of nouns, e.g. meaning, e.g. unlock.I, you, he, it.

Pronoun


Subordinate clause

A less important part of a sentence which doesn’t make sense on its own.

Subordinate clause


Subordinate clause1

e.g. sense on its own.While you were out, I watched TV.

While you were out is the subordinate clause because it doesn’t make sense on its own.

Subordinate clause



A doing or being word, e.g. I e.g. cheerrun,

he went, you are.

Verb







Speech marks

Used to show direct speech (also called inverted commas). football.

“Stop!” she shouted.

Speech marks


Apostrophes

Used to show possession, football.

e.g. The girl’s jumper was in her bag.

Apostrophes


Apostrophes1

Used to show omission, football.

e.g. wouldn’t, they’re, I’ve.

Apostrophes


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