Modernising Nursing Careers  Marketplace

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Welcome. Trish Morris-ThompsonChief Nurse

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Modernising Nursing Careers Marketplace

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1. Modernising Nursing Careers Marketplace

2. Welcome Trish Morris-Thompson Chief Nurse & Professor of Nursing and Midwifery

3. MNC overview Kathryn Jones

4. What is Modernising Nursing Careers? ‘The Modernising Nursing Careers Programme is working to equip nurses with the skills and capabilities for their roles by: creating a more flexible and competent workforce updating career pathways and choices for nurses better preparing nurses to lead in a changed system updating the image of the nurse’ (pg 19) DH (2008) A high quality workforce Referring to DH (2006) Modernising Nursing Careers

5. So what does MNC look like for London? Seven work streams: Workforce planning and analysis Degree level registration Preceptorship Nursing careers Clinical support workers Image of Nursing Clinical Leadership

7. Readiness for work of newly qualified nurses in London Readiness for Work Group

8. The RFW Programme Originated in 2008 following work done by Trusts and HEIs Focus on improving employment outcomes for newly-qualified nurses trained in London Small steering group comprises Trust and HEI representatives Four research projects funded by NHSL, all co-led by service and education Non-profit making, outcomes shared across London Research carried out across London – Trusts recruited through London Deans group and London DoNs group We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

9. The RfW Group Linda Burke, Nursing and Midwifery Council Jane Sayer, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Sara Christian, Kingston University and St George’s University of London Ruth Harris, Kingston University and St George’s University of London Alison Crombie, Barking, Havering and Redbridge NHS Trust Jane Brindley, LSBU Veronica Corben, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Hospitals Trust Sarah Robinson, NNRU, KCL Debbie Harris, LSBU, Mary Crawford, KCL, Angela Grainger, KCH, Carol Pook, Bucks University We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

10. Key findings from London Trusts, 2008 Variable feedback – 50% trusts - highest from acute, lowest MH Inconsistent record-keeping Employment rates 50% or lower overall High for children’s nursing, lower for MH, high for graduates & accelerated programmes Main reason not appointed - did not meet competency requirements of the post Gender and ethnicity – little data but issues of ethnicity are significant Good practice: ring-fencing vacancies; briefing students; trust liaison person; websites; joint selection process; practice experience facilitators We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

11. Recruiting Competent Newly Qualified Nurses Sara Christian

12. Project team Leading organisations South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Kingston University and St George’s University of London South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Dr Jane Sayer Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s University of London Dr Linda Burke Sara Christian Dr Ann Ooms

13. Recruiting Competent Newly Qualified Nurses The aim of the study is to compare and contrast interpretations of competence in practice and to explore the expectations and experiences of the employing Trusts throughout the London Region. The objectives are: To define and understand interpretations of competence in the context of selection and recruitment To map and compare interpretations of competency in practice: KSF, NMC and QAA Benchmarks To survey and map assessment and selection procedures currently used across the London Region To explore the views of senior nurses and identify the key competencies perceived to be essential at the point of first employment We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

14. Phase 1: Literature Review and Mapping defining competence historical developments in perceptions and definitions of competence in nursing the link between competence and quality of care the relationship between expertise and competence competence in relation to selection and recruitment comparing and contrasting the interpretations of competence in practice (the NMC and KSF Frameworks) and how these translate to the selection and recruitment of newly qualified nurse. We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

15. Phase 2: Survey of Selection Procedures Across the London Region 64 Trusts surveyed 45 respondents :70% response rate 57% have centralised recruitment process ten competence assessments used across the Region most useful assessments: interviews (88%), drug calculations (43%), role play (15%) good interpersonal skills, particularly communication skills, considered to be a priority 5-70% of NQNs considered suitable for recruitment (mean = 34%). main reasons for non-appointment: poor communication, poor performance, lack of motivation We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

16. Phase 3: Exploring Views of Senior Nurses through Focus Groups Key competencies for NQNs: communication skills, clinical judgement, core clinical skills, ability to prioritise, awareness of equality, diversity and teamwork, common sense, flexibility, professional attitude, awareness of own limitations, enthusiasm to learn Not meeting expectations: poor motivation, lack of respect, poor written communication, over-confidence, poor knowledge, lack of empathy, poor sickness record, poor understanding of role, lack of basic skills, poor appearance style in which a competence is presented competences vs personal qualities We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

17. Exploring Employment Opportunities Within London for Nurses at the Point of Qualification Ruth Harris Ann Ooms

18. Project team Leading organisations South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Kingston University and St George’s University of London South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Dr Jane Sayer Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s University of London Dr Linda Burke Mrs Christine Chu Mr Robert Grant Professor Ruth Harris Dr Sylvie Marshall-Lucette Dr Ann Ooms

19. Aims and objectives To describe the characteristics of newly qualified nursing workforce at September and February time points from 8 HEIs in London To describe the first post gained after qualification and all posts undertaken within 6 months of qualification in terms of grade, setting, nature and duration of contracts and geographical distribution To explore employment patterns of different groups of nurses from London Universities including differences between ethnic group, age, gender, branch of nursing, level of achievement

20. Study design, methods and sample An exploratory study using structured questionnaires and secondary analysis of routinely collected data about students and their progress by Higher Education Institutions. Approval obtained from the Research Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s University of London. Sample: All students who have successfully completed a diploma or degree in nursing from one of eight higher education institutions (HEI) in London and were eligible to register with the NMC were invited to participate in the study

21. Data collection Data were collected in two ways: Participants were asked to complete 3 semi-structured questionnaires during the study: Pre-qualification. Questionnaire requested age, ethnicity, language taught in at school, whether they have a job, type of job, length of contract, number of attempts to get a job, use of assessment tests. Three months post-qualification. Similar questions as the first questionnaire and some additional questions about their perceptions of the process of recruitment and feedback received after job interviews. Six months post-qualification. Similar questions as the first questionnaire.

22. Data collection Routinely collected data about students held by HEIs were collected. Data collected includes: - level of achievement (Diploma, Degree, Accelerated Degree, other), - degree classification if appropriate, - qualifications at course entry, - assessment failure in practice placements i.e. ever failed more than one attempt, - assessment failure in theory assignments i.e. ever failed more than one attempt.

23. Recruitment Autumn 2009 qualifying students 1168 students qualified from 7 HEIs (unable to collect data from 1 HEI) 649 students present when we presented study 515 completed questionnaire 1 - response rate 79% (44% of all students) 99 completed questionnaire 2 - response rate 15% (8% of all students) 108 completed questionnaire 3 - response rate 16% (9% of all students)

24. Recruitment Spring 2010 qualifying students 481 No. of students qualified from 6 London HEIs (1 HEI has no spring intake, unable to collect data from 1 HEI) 398 students present when we presented study 288 completed questionnaire 1 - response rate 72% (60% of all students) 73 completed questionnaire 2 - response rate 18% (15% of all students) 37 completed questionnaire 3 - response rate 9% (8% of all students)

25. Study progress This is a very complex data set requiring careful multivariate statistical analysis which is being undertaken with support from an experienced statistician It is expected that the study identify the factors that influence employment opportunities of nurses immediately post qualification. This will enable HEI and NHS trusts to review how student nurses are prepared for job seeking and how they are selected.

26. Student Nurse Attrition Alison Crombie Jane Brindley

27. Project team Leading organisations Barking, Havering, Redbridge University Trusts, Guy’s & St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust in collaboration with LSBU Barking, Havering, Redbridge University Trusts Dr Alison Crombie London South Bank University Dr Alison Crombie Jane Brindley

28. Student Nurse Attrition Aims and Objectives Identify factors associated with high levels of completion of studies Analyse the research findings and make recommendations for best practice that support an integrated policy framework to improve nurse recruitment, retention and increase the numbers of nurses in the London Workforce We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

29. Student Nurse Attrition: Preliminary Results Focus Groups & Interviews:- Mentors are a vital element to student experience. Student identity is a key factor in fostering resilience Perceived ‘Ideal types of students’ Students perceive both HEI & Trusts want attrition. Heightened emphasis on clinical feedback over HEI We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

30. Is mentorship capacity sufficient to meet pre-registration student need? Veronica Corben Sarah Robinson

31. Project team Leading organisations Chelsea and Westminster Hospitals NHS Hospitals Trust and King’s College London Chelsea and Westminster NHS Hospitals Trust Veronica Corben Tracy Stevenson National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London Dr Sarah Robinson Susan Knutton Dr Jocelyn Cornish Christine Driscoll

32. Aims and Objectives Aim: To investigate whether mentorship capacity is sufficient to meet pre registration student nurse need Objectives: to investigate capacity in relation to: Resources for mentorship provision Education and experience of mentors Facilitators and constraints in practice settings Project focus is the hinterland of inter-relationships in higher education institutions and trusts that lie behind the mentor and student nurse relationship in practice settings. We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

33. Project methods and Progress Methods: Semi-structured interviews with key personnel in 2 higher education institutions and a sample of associated trusts that include adult, mental health and child services in institutional and community settings Progress to date: Pilot completed with 1 HEI and 1 Trust. Main field work now in progress in higher education institutions to be followed by interviews in 7 Trusts. We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

34. Preliminary pilot findings:1 The pilot, underpinned by an extensive literature review, revealed considerable and sometimes unexpected diversity in the organisation of mentorship, between HEIs, between Trusts, and their inter relationship also. Diversity included: roles & responsibilities, HEI or Trust placement allocation of students, mentorship module arrangements, responsibility for assessing placement quality, who commissions post registration education etc. Understanding this diversity has significantly influenced and clarified the interview schedules for the main project which is investigating capacity in relation to: We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

35. Preliminary pilot findings:2 Resources: HEI/Trust links; ascertaining mentor to student ratios; criteria/motivation for being a mentor/sign-off mentor; differences in placement provision/assessing quality; direct and indirect costs. Education and experience of mentors: module format and content; role of programme leader and teaching staff; preparation for assessing competence; maintaining expertise. Delivery in practice settings: allocating students to mentors; managing the role of mentor; HEI/trust liaison; supporting mentors.

36. Workplace preparation: A London Snapshot Sue Fergy

37. Workplace Preparation review aimed to: Gain a realistic account of a complex picture Consultation with a range of nurses: Assistant /Directors of Nursing, Newly Qualified Nurses and Registered Nurses undertaking the mentorship programme and Strategic Leads Range of Trusts: acute, primary care, mental health, foundation

38. Questions were asked about: All-graduate profession The RNs with degrees versus RNs with diplomas Mentorship Work in progress to modernise the nursing workforce Preparation for students undertaking the new programmes

39. All graduate profession

40. Degrees and Diplomas The majority of Trusts do not exercise a preference for employing graduates as opposed to RNs with diplomas The percentage of RNs with degrees to RNs with diplomas was estimated at 30% to 70% Growing numbers of staff are achieving at Masters and PhD levels A small minority of staff do not want to be developed further

41. Mentorship Most staff believe that the quality of mentorship is related to the clinical expertise of the mentor, not academic qualification It was suggested that some non-graduate mentors may feel anxious about the new programme Mentorship presents Trusts with a significant bureaucratic workload It may be timely to review the preparation and practice of mentors and ask questions: Should all RNs be mentors? Should mentoring and assessing practice be separate roles?

42. Current Workforce Initiatives Significant CPPD activity in ‘top-ups’/ Masters/ PhD South London and the Maudsley: Magnet status -75% graduate target Some ‘bespoke’ top-up degrees for a cohort of RNs (Tower Hamlets PCT, CNW London Mental Health FT) BNU offering a Foundation Degree for Band 3 and 4 staff Preceptorship at Master’s level at St.George’s Healthcare NHS Trust PhD opportunities for newly qualified RNs at Imperial

43. Future Challenges What will the impact of the all-graduate workforce be on skill mix? How do academic levels map against clinical competence / expertise? How is the confidence and competence of existing staff to be supported during major change? How is the widened entry gate to be protected as entry qualifications are raised? What is the best way of managing registered nurses who do not want to be further developed? How is a higher calibre of applicant to be attracted to the profession?

44. Scoping the workforce - Advanced Practice & Assistant Practitioners Andrew Brown

45. Advanced nursing practice Initial brief was to understand where advanced practice was taking place in London – what education level these practitioners have and understand what makes them advanced? Initial approach was to conduct two workshops – the consensus from the workshop was that there needed to be a definition and clarity about what advanced practice was and how this differs from specialist practice. How do you distinguish between advanced and specialist practice? Beginner – advanced continuum and the generalist specialist continuum helpful to illustrate the spectrum of practice. Consensus about MSC education level that supports the practitioner in their practice Consensus about Minimum period of experience Experience reported that advanced practice roles tend to be organic in development and responsive to changes in workforce rather than planned service development often with the individual practitioner developing themselves DH paper released in November 2010 provided the definition. The document sets out 28 elements of advanced practiced group around 4 themes. Definition is generic and describes a level of practice rather than a specific role or setting To get greater depth into the data set we developed a questionnaire based on previous work done in Scotland that picked up on the 4 themes and also enquired about the practitioners autonomy and ability to act. Initial data results suggest great variance Initial brief was to understand where advanced practice was taking place in London – what education level these practitioners have and understand what makes them advanced? Initial approach was to conduct two workshops – the consensus from the workshop was that there needed to be a definition and clarity about what advanced practice was and how this differs from specialist practice. How do you distinguish between advanced and specialist practice? Beginner – advanced continuum and the generalist specialist continuum helpful to illustrate the spectrum of practice. Consensus about MSC education level that supports the practitioner in their practice Consensus about Minimum period of experience Experience reported that advanced practice roles tend to be organic in development and responsive to changes in workforce rather than planned service development often with the individual practitioner developing themselves DH paper released in November 2010 provided the definition. The document sets out 28 elements of advanced practiced group around 4 themes. Definition is generic and describes a level of practice rather than a specific role or setting To get greater depth into the data set we developed a questionnaire based on previous work done in Scotland that picked up on the 4 themes and also enquired about the practitioners autonomy and ability to act. Initial data results suggest great variance

46. Recommendations Range of recommendations aimed at Board, Service and Individual level Key recommendation - need to link effective workforce planning and service redesign to create advanced practice roles that meet patient needs

47. Assistant practitioners

48. Recommendations and signposts A range of organisational tools have been identified to support the introduction of new ways of working and new roles A range of recommendations made in the form of a checklist covering: Organisational readiness Workplace readiness Individual readiness Collaboration with the education provider Best practice examples/ job descriptions from UCLH

49. Next steps Checklist included in the 2011/12 education commissioning template Links between workforce planning and education commissioning made more explicit

50. Clinical Academic Careers Alison Crombie

52. NHS London - Developing Frameworks for London Evidence guiding practice- practice guiding evidence?

53. Moving forward – Developing Research Capacity and Capability across London We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreeement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organsiations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

54. Clinical Academic Career Pathways Nina Khazaezadeh Consultant Midwife in Public Health

55. KHP Consultant Nurse Midwives & Allied Health professionals The group was established June 2010 with the aim to develop clinical career pathways for nurses/midwives & allied health professionals across the KHP Members include: Consultant Nurses & Midwives from KCH/Allied health professionals from SLAM/KCL educational leads/Programme Director Modernising Nursing Careers We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

56. Progress… To develop a package including; Vision statement E-nursing/midwifery career toolkit Promote courses/programmes offered at KCL Series of case studies We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

57. Vision Statement To develop a Nursing and Midwifery Clinical Academic Pathway (NMCAP) that draws on all KHP partner organisations’ expertise in education, teaching, research and knowledge translation. The NMCAP will strengthen the vision of KHP AHSC (excellence in education, teaching, research and translation into clinical care for the benefit of our patients) by building capacity and capability in the nursing and midwifery workforce. Provision of high quality clinical professionals whose skills and competencies are optimised through access to high quality teaching, education and research has been recognised by the KHP AHSC as a core requirement to achieve clinical effectiveness. The NMCAP will contribute to achieving this requirement as well as the core principles of the NHS Outcomes Framework. We believe that the development of a NMCAP will promote excellence and high quality care for patients and enable nurses and midwives to plan and progress their clinical career development. The Pathway will provide a robust underpinning for a nursing and midwifery workforce fit for purpose, competent, highly educated, compassionate and nationally and internationally recognised as a KHP brand. We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

58. We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA We have already made significant progress on several fronts, In terms of a clear contractual framework within which education commissioning operates the most significant piece of work we have completed with you is the development and design of the London Education Contract. A key element of this contract is that we have used it to embed the concept that where possible there should be a single point of accountability for what is commissioned even where such provision is done in partnership. We do not underestimate the challenge this presents so in addition to the placement project we discussed earlier we developed standard agreement for use by partners Individual negotiation on the contracts are progressing well with a majority already agreed You will also be aware that one of our aims is to increase investment in existing staff and I know that Continuing Personal and Professional Development is an important priority for many of you here today. In a minute I’ll come onto the work we’ve been doing to meet specific priorities.   However, in contract terms we have been designing a standard contract framework for all CPPD providers to enable a more consistent approach to commissioning and allow us to open up choice to employers    We have had conversations to assess your opinions about standardising descriptions of CPPD courses, contract currencies etc... Again the aim is to increase choice for employers and allow us and HEIs to have a clearer view of the range of education available. We have started our consideration of how to formalise our funding of NHS organisations but the more important engagement with trusts to finalise this will fall into the next phase of our work which Anita will describe. Finally, the contractual framework must included the basis on which educators are rewarded. High Quality care for All commits us to a model where funding follows student and London has been at the forefront of this national work with something like 19 of 25 pilots being London trusts with dedicated resource and support form the SHA

59. THANK YOU Any questions........?

60. MNC Website Launch 31st March! Full details will be circulated via email.

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