Language
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Language PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 101 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Language. SOUNDS: ALLITERATION:  Repeated consonant sounds  "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers" ASSONANCE:  Repeated Vowel sounds  "The June moon loomed over the horizon" ONOMATOPOEIA:  Words sound like what they are  "The fire crackled and the popcorn popped.". IMAGERY:

Download Presentation

Language

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Language

Language


Language

SOUNDS:

ALLITERATION:

 Repeated consonant sounds

 "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers"

ASSONANCE:

 Repeated Vowel sounds

 "The June moon loomed over the horizon"

ONOMATOPOEIA:

 Words sound like what they are

 "The fire crackled and the popcorn popped."


Language

IMAGERY:

(Creating pictures for the senses)

METAPHOR:

 A direct comparison

 "The Springbox were ripped to shreds on the field."

SIMILE:

 A comparison using "Like" or "as"

 “He is as fierce as a volcano."

HYPERBOLE:

 An exaggeration

 “The queues went on forever!"


Language

PERSONIFICATION:

 Making an inanimate object act like a person or animal

 "The fog crept in on little cat feet.“

ALLUSION:

 A cross reference to another work of art

 "My boyfriend dances like King Kong."

SYNECDOCHE:

 Using part of an object to stand for the whole thing

 "Have you got your wheels, man?"


Language

SYMBOLISM:

 Something represents a completely different thing or idea.

A black glove may represent death.

ANTITHESIS:

 Saying the opposite of what you really mean, for effect

 "That was a cool move, man.“

PUN:

Ambiguities of meaning.

"Whenever you shop at Four Square you'll like the Change."


Language

SENTENCES

SIMPLE SENTENCE

has one clause.

We drove from Connecticut to Tennessee.

INCOMPLETE SENTENCE

has no noun

Stop! Where?

MINOR SENTENCE

has no verb

A cool mint gel. A fantastic party!


Language

COMPOUND SENTENCE

(more than one independent clause):

We were exhausted, but we arrived in time for my father's party.

COMPLEX SENTENCE

(one independent clause and at least one dependent clause):

Although he is now 79 years old, he still claims to be 65.


Language

DECLARATIVE SENTENCE

makes a statement and ends with a full stop.

The children were happy to see you.

INTERROGATIVE SENTENCE

asks a question.

EXCLAMATORY SENTENCE

shows strong feeling and ends with an exclamation mark. How outrageous!

IMPERATIVE SENTENCE

gives a command.

Sit there and listen. (You, sit there and listen.)


Language

RHETORIC QUESTION

Asks a question for the reader to consider

Do you want great looking shiny hair?

BALANCED SENTENCE

A balance in the structure of the sentence.

Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. (John F. Kennedy)

ONE WORD = ONE SENTENCE

A sentence is left by itself to emphasis a key idea.

She stood there. Alone.

  • PARALLEL CONSTRUCTIONS: The sentence is constructed

    using similar building blocks.

    “He walked through the door, through the back yard, through her life.”


Language

DIRECT AND INDIRECT SPEECH

In direct speech, the original speaker's exact words are given and are indicated by quotation marks.

"I don't know what to do," said Dean.

In indirect speech, the exact meaning of the speaker's words is given, but the exact words are not directly quoted.

Dean said that he didn't know what to do.


Language

VOCABULARY

ADJECTIVES

sight: including colors, shapes, sizes

sound: including types and volume

smell: including scents and strengths

taste: including flavors and strengths

touch: including textures and temperatures

emotions and subjective reactions: (happy, excited,

ecstatic, sad, lonely, beautiful, ugly

states: tired, angered, smart, rich, hungry, lonely

EMOTIVE LANGUAGE

Persuasive language is important to recognise and understand. A common way writers persuade a reader is by appealing to the emotions by using language that generates sympathy in some way.

The knife ripped through his battered body.


Language

COLLOQUIAL LANGUAGE

an expression not used in formal language (such as "gonna" or "grouty" or "uffda"), phrases (such as "ain't nothin'" and "dead as a doornail"), or sometimes even an entire aphorism ("There's more than one way to skin a cat") used primarily within a limited geographical area.

JARGON

Words which relate to a specific activity, profession, or group. It is generally formal terminology and commonly referred to as the language of a particular field.

SLANG

the use of highly informal words and expressions. Slang is very often specific to a particular context or group.

She’s a mullet.


Language

CONNOTATIONS

The connotation essentially relates to how anything may be associated with a word or phrase, for example, an implied value judgement or feelings.

A stubborn person may be described as being either strong-willed or pig-headed. Although these have the same literal meaning (i.e. stubborn), strong-willedconnotes admiration for someone's convictions, while pig-headedconnotes frustration in dealing with someone.

ABSTRACT NOUNS

Abstract nouns are ideas, feelings or qualities such as love, hate, kindness, fear, anger, imagination, courage, intelligence, loneliness, happiness, sadness, bravery, cowardice, embarrassment, joy, beauty, ugliness, confidence, luck, misfortune, mischief, bitterness, justice, injustice, grief, boredom, cheerfulness. They cannot be seen or touched in the same way as concrete nouns such as chair, table, dog, Lancaster, or Thomas.


  • Login