Maryland Violent Death Reporting System (MVDRS): Using Data to Tell Victims’ Stories
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Maryland Violent Death Reporting System (MVDRS): Using Data to Tell Victims’ Stories. Thomas Manion, M.A. Project Coordinator, MVDRS Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. A “National” System for Violence Prevention. 2002 – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Maryland Violent Death Reporting System (MVDRS): Using Data to Tell Victims’ Stories

Thomas Manion, M.A.

Project Coordinator, MVDRS

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


A “National” System for Violence Prevention to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • 2002 – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    • Public health approach to violence prevention

    • National system with state-level components

    • Five states funded initially (including Maryland)


Currently Funded States to Tell Victims’ Stories


Maryland’s System: to Tell Victims’ Stories

MVDRS

  • Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

  • First Data Collection Year: 2003

  • Data available through 2010


MVDRS Mission: to Tell Victims’ Stories

1. Maintain detailed body of information on Maryland violent deaths

2. Promote greater scientific understanding of violence

3. Encourage the development of effective violent death prevention and intervention strategies


What constitutes a to Tell Victims’ Stories

violent death?

“A death resulting from the intentional use of physical force or power* against oneself, another person, or group.”

*Includes poisons/drugs


Manners of Death to Tell Victims’ Stories

Evaluated

  • Homicide

  • Suicide

  • Death of Undetermined Intent

  • Accidental (ONLY if firearm-related)

As ruled by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for Maryland


Where does our data to Tell Victims’ Stories

come from?

Medical Examiner Reports (OCME)

Death Certificates (MD Vital Statistics)

MVDRS

Police Reports (State and Local Law Enforcement)


Data Collected to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • Victim/Suspect demographics

  • Victim/Suspect relationship (if applicable)

  • Victim’s marital status, education, current occupation

  • Time, date, location of injury

  • Weapon and wound details

  • Toxicology

  • Precipitating Circumstances

  • Narratives

MVDRS

Database


What sets MVDRS data apart? to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • Unprecedented level of detail

  • Precipitating circumstances

  • In-depth narratives


Our Philosophy on to Tell Victims’ Stories

Violent Death

1.) Every victim has a story

2.) Prevention should be grounded in scientific research


Stories to Tell Victims’ Stories

Data

Trends

Prevention


Limitations to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • NO data on Maryland residents injured out of state

  • Data Collection Timeline

    • 1-2 year lag between death and inclusion in MVDRS


MVDRS Data Highlights to Tell Victims’ Stories*

2010

*All rates are crude

rates per 100,000

population


Violent Death Overview to Tell Victims’ Stories

1,427 violent deaths = 24.7 per 100,000

  • Male rate (39) more than triple the female rate (11.3)

  • Age 25-29 had the highest age-specific rate (44.5)


Manner of Death to Tell Victims’ Stories


Homicide Overview to Tell Victims’ Stories

389 deaths = 6.7 per 100,000

  • Nearly half of victims were Baltimore residents

  • Nearly 80% of homicide victims were black

  • Most common location of injury was a street/sidewalk/alley (40.6%)


Homicide: Residential County to Tell Victims’ Stories


Homicide: Cause of Death to Tell Victims’ Stories


Homicide : Circumstantial Data to Tell Victims’ Stories

Most common precipitating circumstances:

  • Argument/Conflict

  • Precipitated by another crime

  • Drug involvement

  • Intimate partner violence


Suicide Overview to Tell Victims’ Stories

481 deaths = 8.3 per 100,000

  • Age groups with the highest rates were 45-54 (13.7), 75-84 (11.2) and 55-64 (11.2)

  • Harford County had the highest suicide rate (11.4)

  • Veterans accounted for nearly 18% of suicides (all males)


Suicide: Injury Location to Tell Victims’ Stories


Suicide: Cause of Death to Tell Victims’ Stories


Suicide: Circumstantial Data to Tell Victims’ Stories

Most common precipitating circumstances:

  • Current mental health diagnosis

  • Disclosed intent/suicidal ideations

  • Intimate partner problem

  • Physical health problem

  • Job problem

  • Financial problem


Suicide: Circumstantial Data to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • Only 55% of victims with a current mental health diagnosis were currently being treated

  • Female victims were significantly more likely than males to have a history of suicide attempts (37.8% vs 18.6%)

  • 35.7% of victims left a suicide note


Recent Publication to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • Suicidology Online, vol. 3, pp. 131-137

  • Comparison of Maryland suicide deaths by victim age

  • Cumulative data 2003-2009


Recent Publication to Tell Victims’ Stories

Four Age Groups:

  • Youth (19 and younger)

  • Young Adult (20-34)

  • Middle Aged (35-64)

  • Elder (65 and older)


Conclusions to Tell Victims’ Stories

  • MVDRS as a source of violent death data

    • Circumstances, special populations

  • Focused prevention efforts

    • By Age?


  • Thomas Manion to Tell Victims’ Stories

    Project Coordinator

    Maryland Violent Death Reporting System

    Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

    [email protected]

    410-767-5744


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