Smart
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 27

Strategies for student retention PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 96 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

SMART . Strategies for student retention. Welcome!. Alice Camuti, Ph.D. Director, Career Services Tennessee Technological University. SMART. Agenda. Student Retention – Why It’s Important Strategies That Influence Retention Results of National Survey TTU Retention Efforts

Download Presentation

Strategies for student retention

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Smart

SMART

Strategies for student retention


Welcome

Welcome!

Alice Camuti, Ph.D.

Director, Career Services

Tennessee Technological University


Agenda

SMART

Agenda

  • Student Retention – Why It’s Important

  • Strategies That Influence Retention

  • Results of National Survey

  • TTU Retention Efforts

    • TTU Retention Experiment

  • Making a Difference in Your Programs

  • Developing Campus Partnerships


Why care

SMART

Why Care?

  • Governing Agencies are moving from enrollment based to outcomes based formula’s

  • States are pushing for higher college graduation rates of their constituents

  • It’s the right thing to do


Points about student retention

SMART

Points About Student Retention

  • Student departure has little to do with flunking out (only 10-15%)

  • Social isolation is primary cause for departure

  • 75% of most students leave within the first two years of college

    Source: Tinto, 1987, 2007


Retention and graduation

SMART

Retention and Graduation

  • What percentage of first-time freshmen in Fall return for their . . .

    . . . spring semester TTU: 91% UTK: 86.2%

    . . . second year TTU: 73% UTK: 71.7%

  • What percentage of students graduate…

    …within five years? TTU: 41% UTK: 58.5%

    …within six years? TTU: 48% UTK: 60.5%


Tennessee change in focus

Tennessee Change in Focus

  • Moving to a productivity-driven funding formula

    • Graduation rates

    • Degree production

    • Student Retention

  • “Complete College Tennessee Act”


National survey results

SMART

National Survey Results

Of 220 respondents…

  • 49% Did not know if they had a graduation requirement goal

  • 49% Did not know if they had a retention rate requirement goal


April 2012 national survey

SMART

April 2012 – National Survey

  • Population: 2800 Career Services Directors

  • 220 respondents 7.9% response rate

  • www.SurveyMonkey

  • 84% Centralized

  • 53.8% public

  • 65.2% 0-10,000 FTE …….13.4% > 25,000 FTE


Retention strategies

SMART

Retention Strategies

Predictors of persistence include:

  • Coordinated Studies Program (first-year seminar)

  • College GPA

  • Hours studied per week

  • Perceptions of faculty

  • Involvement with other students

    (Tinto, 1997)


Effective practices identified in the literature

SMART

Effective Practices Identified in the Literature

  • Honors programs for academically advanced students

  • Academic support program or services

  • Programs designed specifically for at-risk students

  • Mandatory advising, one-on-one and face-to-face between faculty and students

  • Programs designed specifically for first-year students

Source: Noel-Levitz 2011


Programs practices across the u s

SMART

Programs/Practices Across the U.S.


Career services participation

SMART

Career Services Participation


Ttu campus retention initiatives

SMART

TTU Campus Retention Initiatives

  • Retention Committee

  • First-year Connections 1 hr. Seminar

  • Freshmen Mentors – 2 semesters

  • Freshmen “Majors” fair; Engineering majors fair, Business majors and clubs fair


Ttu initiatives continued

SMART

TTU Initiatives (continued)

  • Communication with “at risk” students

  • Contact during the summer: non-enrollees

  • Learning Commons in Library

  • Living/Learning Villages


Ttu retention committee experiment

SMART

TTU Retention Committee Experiment

  • 28 freshmen class sections/587 students

  • Psychosocial teaching method = 14

  • Academic skill-building method = 14

  • Fall of 2009 implemented, Fall of 2010 results


Which cohort had the higher retention rates

SMART

Which Cohort had the Higher Retention Rates?

  • Cohort A – psychosocial

  • Cohort B – academic skills


Psychosocial

SMART

Psychosocial

Sorry, You are Wrong

Link Back


Academic skill building

SMART

Academic Skill-Building

Yes, you are correct

Link Back


Experiment results

SMART

Experiment Results

  • Probability that a student will LEAVE within Three (3) semesters:

  • Psychosocial27%

  • Academic21%

    Logistical Regression, p=.0371, 95% significance


Academic skill building1

SMART

Academic Skill-Building

  • Time management

  • Study Skills

  • Career Plan

  • Career Assessment

  • ‘Structured’ classroom environment


Where do we fit in

SMART

Where Do We Fit In

  • Skill building workshops focusing on freshmen

  • Resume for freshmen

  • Co-op /internship exposure

  • Career assessment

  • Assist with majors fairs


Become a retention champion

SMART

Become a Retention Champion

  • Campus Retention Initiatives

  • Week of welcome, fall semester activities

    • Not always related

  • Develop Partnerships with on-campus departments involved in student success

    • i.e. first-year seminar classes


First year seminars

SMART

First Year Seminars

  • Invite freshmen classes in for tours

  • Offer to come to the freshmen classes with “deal or no deal” interactive trivia game

  • Create career content/career components for first year seminars

  • Instructor newsletter:

    events/workshops/pre-packaged PowerPoint presentations


Questions discussion

SMART

Questions…Discussion…

Your Ideas


Thank you

SMART

Thank You!

Alice Camuti

[email protected]

931-372-3232


References

SMART

REFERENCES

  • Derby, D. & Smith, T.(2004). An orientation course and community college retention. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 28, 763-773.

  • Glass, J. (1995). Student participation in college orientation course, retention, and gpa. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 19, 117-132.

  • Kuth, G. (2006). Student Success in College. Jossey-Base.

  • Noel-Levitz (2011). 2011 Student retention practices at four-year and two-year institutions. Retrieved January 10, 2012 from www.noellevitz.com

  • Swail, W. (2006). Seven guiding questions for student retention. Student Success, January 2006. Retrieved from www.educationalpolicy.org

  • Tinto, V. (2006/2007). Research and practice of student retention: what next? Journal College Student Retention, 8(1), 1-19.

  • Tinto, V. (1987). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition. The University of Chicago Press: Chicago.

  • Tinto, V. (Nov/Dec 1997). Classrooms as communities: Exploring the educational characteristics of student persistence. The Journal of Higher Education, 68, 599-623.

  • Tinto, V. (July/August 1988). Stages of student departure: reflections on the longitudinal character of student leaving. Journal of Higher Education, 59(4), 438-455.


  • Login