Unit i introduction to the cell
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UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO THE CELL. Cell/Developmental Biology Group 4 Bryant Chase, Lloyd Epstein, Trisha Spears, Florida State University Jill Beyette and Brian Kinkle, University of Cincinnati Kathy Miller and Kathy Hafer, Washington University. “The Bloom-ing Idiots”. Context.

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UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO THE CELL

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Unit i introduction to the cell

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO THE CELL

Cell/Developmental Biology

Group 4

Bryant Chase, Lloyd Epstein, Trisha Spears, Florida State University

Jill Beyette and Brian Kinkle, University of Cincinnati

Kathy Miller and Kathy Hafer, Washington University

“The Bloom-ing Idiots”


Context

Context

  • First semester, introductory biology class for majors

  • Large lecture format (> 100 students)

  • The unit is designed to span 4-5 lectures

  • The tidbit is designed to be used the first day of lecture


Unit i introduction to the cell

At the end of the unit, students should…

Be able to:

Understand:


Unit i introduction to the cell

At the end of the unit, students should…

Be able to:

Understand:


Learning goals for this tidbit

Learning Goals for this Tidbit

Students will understand:

1. fundamental differences between living and non-living entities


Learning goals for this tidbit1

Learning Goals for this Tidbit

Students will understand:

1. fundamental differences between living and non-living entities

2. that scientific knowledge is dynamic

  • the body of knowledge is currently incomplete

  • new knowledge can cause us to change our theories about science


Learning goals for this tidbit2

Learning Goals for this Tidbit

Students will understand:

1. fundamental differences between living and non-living entities

2. that scientific knowledge is dynamic

  • the body of knowledge is incomplete

  • new knowledge can cause us to change our theories about science

    3. categories and definitions that scientists use have limitations and may change over time


Learning outcomes

Learning Outcomes

After completing this tidbit, students will be able to:

  • list defining properties of a living entity

  • analyze evidence and decide if an entity is alive

  • evaluate the ability of our current definition of life to accommodate new scientific and technological innovations


Have you met aiko

Have you met Aiko?

YouTube video


Have you met aiko1

Have you met Aiko?

Clicker activity:

Is Aiko alive?

Yes

No

I don’t have sufficient information


What are the defining characteristics of life

What are the defining characteristics of life?

On your own, take 1 minute and write down at least 3 characteristics of all living things.

Assemble into groups of 4 and take 2 minutes to make a single combined list. Choose your top 3.


Defining characteristics of life

Defining characteristics of life

Evolution

Organization (cells)

Growth (and development)

Metabolism

Reproduction (genetic material)

Regulation (homeostasis)

Response (to environment)


Unit i introduction to the cell

Clicker activity:

Try these: Which of these are living entities?

A: 1

B: 2

C: 3

D: 2 and 3

E: 1, 2 and 3

1

3

2


Unit i introduction to the cell

Now it gets harder.

Which of these are living entities?

A: 1

B: 2

C: 3

D: 1 and 2

E: 1 and 3

1

2

3


Let s imagine aiko 10 0

Let’s imagine Aiko 10.0

real human skin

solar-powered

programmed to build Aiko 11.0, Ariko 1.0 (a boy)


Unit i introduction to the cell

Clicker question: Thinking about the list of defining characteristics of life, is Aiko 11.0 now alive?

A) YesB) No


Unit i introduction to the cell

Clicker question: Thinking about the list of defining characteristics of life, is Aiko 11.0 now alive?

A) YesB) No

Food for thought: what would make Aiko 11.0 alive? Do we need to modify our list?


Homework assignment

Homework assignment

Venter Institute Scientists Create First Synthetic Bacterial Genome

http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-bacterial-genome/press-release/

Assignment: read the article and write a short paragraph evaluating whether Venter has successfully created new life


Unit i introduction to the cell

Learning Goals for the Entire Teachable Unit

Students should understand the following:

  • differences between living and non-living entities

  • the essential characteristics and defining properties of a cell

  • not all cells are the same

  • an organism can be one cell or many cells

  • scientific knowledge is incomplete and subject to change


Formative assessments

Formative Assessments

Individual response clicker questions

Individual followed by group brainstorm

Group discussion

Repeat clicker question after evaluating new evidence


Summative assessment

Summative Assessment

  • Exam Question:

  • Assume a Mars probe brought back a sample with the following properties:

  • It moves toward light

  • It responds to sound by repeating the sounds

  • It can pick up small objects and internalize them

  • The director of the Mars Study Group announces that life has been discovered on Mars. Do you agree? Explain your reasoning.


Addressing diversity

Addressing Diversity

  • Our classroom activities accommodate different learning

  • styles in the following ways:

  • Visual (photographs)

  • Auditory (group discussion and listening to instructor)

  • Read/write (list and one minute paper homework assignment)

Group work encourages diverse students to work together and share ideas

We use a variety of universally recognizable images in our presentation


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