Quality management for organizational excellence lecture presentation notes
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Quality Management for Organizational Excellence Lecture/Presentation Notes. By: Dr. David L. Goetsch and Stanley Davis Based on the book Quality Management for Organizational Excellence (Sixth Edition). Fifteen: Overview of Total Quality Tools. MAJOR TOPICS Total Quality Tools Defined

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Quality Management for Organizational Excellence Lecture/Presentation Notes

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Quality management for organizational excellence lecture presentation notes

Quality Managementfor Organizational ExcellenceLecture/Presentation Notes

By:

Dr. David L. Goetsch and Stanley Davis

Based on the book

Quality Management for Organizational Excellence (Sixth Edition)


Fifteen overview of total quality tools

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools

MAJOR TOPICS

  • Total Quality Tools Defined

  • The Pareto Chart

  • Cause-and-Effect Diagrams

  • Check Sheets

  • Histograms

  • Scatter Diagrams

  • Run Charts and Control Charts

  • Stratification

  • Some Other Tools Introduced

  • Management’s Role in Tool Deployment


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

  • Pareto charts are useful for separating the important from the trivial. They are named after Italian economist and sociologist Vilfredo Pareto. Pareto charts are important because they can help an organization decide where to focus limited resources. On a Pareto chart, data are arrayed along an X-axis and a Y-axis.

  • The cause-and-effect diagram was developed by the late Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a noted Japanese quality expert; others have thus called it the Ishikawa diagram. Its purpose is to help identify and isolate the causes of problems. It is the only one of the seven basic quality tools that is not based on statistics.


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued1

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

  • The check sheet is a tool that facilitates collection of relevant data, displaying it in a visual form easily understood by the brain. Check sheets make it easy to collect data for specific purposes and to present it in a way that automatically converts it into useful information.

  • Histograms have to do with variability. Two kinds of data are commonly associated with processes: attributes data and variables data. An attribute is something that the output product of the process either has or does not have. Variables data are data that result when something is measured. A histogram is a measurement scale across one axis and a frequency of like measurements on the other.


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued2

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

  • The scatter diagram is arguably the simplest of the seven basic quality tools. It is used to determine the correlation between two variables. It can show a positive correlation, a negative correlation, or no correlation.

  • Stratification is a tool used to investigate the cause of a problem by grouping data into categories. Grouping of data by common elements or characteristics makes it easier to understand the data and to draw insights from it.


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued3

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

  • In the context of the seven total quality tools, run charts and control charts are typically thought of as being one tool together. The control chart is a more sophisticated version of the run chart. The run chart records the output results of a process over time. For this reason, the run chart is sometimes called a trend chart. The weakness of the run chart is that it does not tell whether the variation is the result of special causes or common causes. This weakness gave rise to the control chart.


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued4

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

On such a chart, data are plotted just as they are on a run chart, but a lower control limit, an upper control limit, and a process average are added. The plotted data stays between the upper control limit and lower control limit while varying about the center line or average only so long as the variation is the result of common causes such as statistical variation.


Fifteen overview of total quality tools continued5

Fifteen:Overview of Total Quality Tools(Continued)

  • Other useful quality tools are five-S, flowcharts, surveys, failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), and design of experiments (DOE). Five-S is used to eliminate waste and reduce errors, defects, and injuries. Flowcharts are used in a total quality setting for charting the inputs, steps, functions, and outflows of a process to understand more fully how the function works and who or what has input into and influence on the process, its inputs and outputs, and even its timing. The survey is used to obtain relevant information from sources that otherwise would not be heard from in the context of providing helpful data. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) tries to identify all possible product or process failures and prioritize them for elimination according to their risk. Design of experiments (DOE) is a sophisticated method for experimenting with complex processes for the purpose of optimizing them.


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