chapter 3 methods for recording target behaviors
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Chapter 3 – Methods for Recording Target Behaviors

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Chapter 3 – Methods for Recording Target Behaviors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 76 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 3 – Methods for Recording Target Behaviors. Ps534 Dr. Ken Reeve Caldwell College Post-Bac Program in ABA. Reminder…. We need to MEASURE changes in a behavior before we can infer that a technique or procedure was effective

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Chapter 3 – Methods for Recording Target Behaviors' - thomas-jordan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter 3 methods for recording target behaviors

Chapter 3 – Methods for Recording Target Behaviors

Ps534

Dr. Ken Reeve

Caldwell College

Post-Bac Program in ABA

reminder
Reminder…
  • We need to MEASURE changes in a behavior before we can infer that a technique or procedure was effective
  • Behaviors MUST be observable or they cannot be viewed as objective
  • If not recorded by a machine, we need at LEAST two observers to determine accuracy of behavior measurement
reminder1
Reminder…
  • For any behavior, we can measure
    • How often does it occur?
    • How quickly?
    • How intense?
    • How long does it last?
    • What is its latency?
    • When does it occur?
    • Etc.

Only SOME of these may be important for any target behavior.

where to start
Where to start?
  • ANECDOTAL RECORDING (or ABC RECORDING)
  • Somewhat like a more rigorous CASE STUDY
  • Used to informally determine the antecedents, behavior, and consequences for a given client or learner
  • Gives the researcher a chance to identify possible variables to manipulate
what next
What next?
  • Once you’ve formalized your questions about what behavior to study and its relationship to a given intervention technique, you are now ready to record “real” data
  • Can use EVENT-BASED or TIME-BASED recording techniques, depending on the behavior in question…
recording sheets
Recording Sheets
  • Student’s name
  • Date or dates of observation
  • Observer name and role
  • Start and end time
  • Setting of observation
  • Definition of behavior being observed
  • Key to any codes used
event based data recording 1 frequency
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 1. FREQUENCY
  • Need to define what constitutes an occurrence of behavior
  • Is a simple SUM of the total times behavior occurs in a given observation session
  • Observation sessions must be the same duration. Why?
  • Generally used when behavior is free to occur at any time (called FREE OPERANT CONDITION)
side issue inter observer agreement ioa
SIDE ISSUE: INTER-OBSERVER AGREEMENT (IOA)
  • This is degree to which what one observer sees is the same as what another observer sees
  • It is a measure that allows us to either trust or not trust the data collected as being accurate
  • Calculated as
event based data recording 2 rate
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 2. RATE
  • Is frequency of the behavior as a function of a specific time period
  • # of responses PER minute, hour, day, week, etc.
  • Observation sessions can now be different durations in length. Why?

# of responses = 10 = .5/min.

Length of observation 20 mins.

event based data recording 3 percent correct
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 3. PERCENT CORRECT
  • Need to define what constitutes correct or incorrect response
  • Calculated as

Number of correct responses x 100

Number of correct + incorrect

  • This is best used when the number of opportunities to respond varies from day to day or from child to child. Why?
event based data recording 4 trials to criterion
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 4. TRIALS TO CRITERION
  • Measures number of opportunities before skill is correctly emitted
  • Used as indicator of speed of learning
event based data recording 5 cumulative record
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 5. CUMULATIVE RECORD
  • Measures a running total of occurrences of behavior across sessions
  • Used when a certain number of emitted responses is set as the criterion
event based data recording 6 interval recording
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 6. INTERVAL RECORDING
  • Caution: this sounds like a time-based measure (AND SOME EXPERTS DO REFER TO IT AS ONE) but it is EVENT-based!
  • Used when target behavior occurs at very HIGH frequency (which makes rate measures difficult to do)
  • Interval recording is an APPROXIMATION of a rate measure (see more next…)
event based data recording 6 interval recording1
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 6. INTERVAL RECORDING
  • 6a) WHOLE INTERVAL RECORDING
  • Generally used when a learner engages in a long and rapid “run” of a behavior that interferes with other activities
  • Researcher divides observation session into many equal length intervals (ex. 10 min. session may be divided into 60 10-sec. intervals)
  • Researcher records: did behavior “fill” the interval (marks a “+”) or not fill the interval or not occur at all (marks a “”)
  • Data presented as “% of intervals in which target behavior occurred”
  • Whole interval recording tends to underestimate frequency so keep this in mind!
event based data recording 6 interval recording2
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 6. INTERVAL RECORDING
  • 6b) PARTIAL INTERVAL RECORDING
  • Only difference from whole interval recording is that observer notes: did behavior occur at ANY time during the interval (marks a “+”) or not at all (marks a “”)
  • Data presented as “% of intervals in which target behavior occurred”
  • Usually used if behavior occurs for shorter less intrusive durations of time
event based data recording 6 interval recording3
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 6. INTERVAL RECORDING
  • 6c) MOMENTARY TIME SAMPLING
  • Here, observer only observes at the END of an interval (“for just a moment”) and looks to see: Is behavior occurring right now (marks a “+”) or not right now (marks a “”)
  • Data presented as “% of intervals in which target behavior occurred”
  • Usually used if behavior occurs for longer durations of time
event based data recording 7 magnitude recording
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 7. MAGNITUDE RECORDING
  • Measures the INTENSITY of a behavior
  • Usually difficult to be very objective unless a mechanical system of some sort is used
event based data recording 8 topography recording
EVENT-BASED DATA RECORDING: 8. TOPOGRAPHY RECORDING
  • Measures the way the response LOOKS or is moved through space
  • Why an issue? Sometimes we don’t care so much about OUTCOME of a response (like effectively pressing a button with no regard as to how) as we do correctly performing the response (using the finger to press the button as opposed to smashing the button with a fist)
  • Is it appropriate to drop-kick the light switch to turn it off?
time based data recording 1 duration recording
TIME-BASED DATA RECORDING: 1. DURATION RECORDING
  • Records how long the behavior lasts
  • Used when we are more concerned about duration than frequency or rate
  • Ex. Exercise time, eye gaze or attending, in-seat, studying duration, etc.
time based data recording 2 latency recording
TIME-BASED DATA RECORDING: 2. LATENCY RECORDING
  • Records how much time it takes to BEGIN a behavior since an antecedent stimulus was presented
  • Ex. Responding to a request, making an initiation to a person entering a room, etc.
ad