Webinar presented by Meredith Cathcart Jill Larson with Introduction by Mary Hudler

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1. Webinar presented by Meredith Cathcart Jill Larson with Introduction by Mary Hudler Julie DuffieldJulie Duffield

2. 2 Welcome & Introductions Thank you for joining us Please identify yourself in the chat area Introductions will follow Julie DuffieldJulie Duffield

3. 3 Presenters Mary Hudler, Director, Special Education Division Meredith Cathcart, Consultant, Special Education Division Jill Larson, Consultant, Special Education Division Mary Hudler – My name is Mary Hudler. I am the Director of the Special Education Division of the California Department of Education. Meredith Cathcart – My name is Meredith Cathcart. I am a consultant in the Special Education Division of the California Department of Education. My areas of focus at the department are preschool and statewide assessment. Jill Larson – My name is Jill Larson. I am also a consultant in the Special Education Division. My area of focus is graduation and statewide assessment.Mary Hudler – My name is Mary Hudler. I am the Director of the Special Education Division of the California Department of Education. Meredith Cathcart – My name is Meredith Cathcart. I am a consultant in the Special Education Division of the California Department of Education. My areas of focus at the department are preschool and statewide assessment. Jill Larson – My name is Jill Larson. I am also a consultant in the Special Education Division. My area of focus is graduation and statewide assessment.

4. 4 Housekeeping Phones are in presentation mode Questions are welcomed Submit questions online in the text-chat area (lower-left) or Email your questions to [email protected] We will collect your questions and post them as an FAQ after the Webinar For technical support during the event, text-chat Julie Duffield or call 650.296.9201 Julie Duffield We would like to remind you that we welcome all questions. As questions arise, please feel free to submit them in the chat area on-line. If a question arises after this Webinar, please feel free to email Jill Larson at the email address on this slide. We will not be answering the questions today, but will compile all questions and post them as an FAQ on this Web site by the end of next week. If you need technical support at any time during this Webinar, please contact Julie at the number listed on this slide.Julie Duffield We would like to remind you that we welcome all questions. As questions arise, please feel free to submit them in the chat area on-line. If a question arises after this Webinar, please feel free to email Jill Larson at the email address on this slide. We will not be answering the questions today, but will compile all questions and post them as an FAQ on this Web site by the end of next week. If you need technical support at any time during this Webinar, please contact Julie at the number listed on this slide.

5. 5 Agenda Introduction Overview The STAR Program California Modified Assessment (CMA) IEP Requirements Jill Larson Slide 5 We know that many of you are listening to this Webinar in small groups or teams. This will be a great opportunity for you to network, ask questions and set goals for your district. As we go through this informational Webinar we’d like you to think about the following so that you can have a productive work session after this presentation: What will you need to do to address these requirement in your IEPs? What things will need to be in place during the testing window to accommodate students’ needs? If you have an online IEP system, will you need to consider modifications to the goal section of your program in order to write grade-level, standards-based goals for students taking the CMA? How will you increase access to the general education curriculum for you students with disabilities? You will hear us describing some of the slides with graphics. This is to make the slide more accessible for those who need this. So, let’s begin… This is the agenda for today. First we will hear from Mary Hudler, State Director of Special Education. We’ll talk about the purpose of special education and the importance of ensuring access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities. We’ll explain the components of the STAR program and how to determine the most appropriate assessment for students with disabilities. There will also be specific information about the CMA And lastly we will talk about the requirements of the IEP in regard to the CMA.Jill Larson Slide 5 We know that many of you are listening to this Webinar in small groups or teams. This will be a great opportunity for you to network, ask questions and set goals for your district. As we go through this informational Webinar we’d like you to think about the following so that you can have a productive work session after this presentation: What will you need to do to address these requirement in your IEPs? What things will need to be in place during the testing window to accommodate students’ needs? If you have an online IEP system, will you need to consider modifications to the goal section of your program in order to write grade-level, standards-based goals for students taking the CMA? How will you increase access to the general education curriculum for you students with disabilities? You will hear us describing some of the slides with graphics. This is to make the slide more accessible for those who need this. So, let’s begin… This is the agenda for today. First we will hear from Mary Hudler, State Director of Special Education. We’ll talk about the purpose of special education and the importance of ensuring access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities. We’ll explain the components of the STAR program and how to determine the most appropriate assessment for students with disabilities. There will also be specific information about the CMA And lastly we will talk about the requirements of the IEP in regard to the CMA.

6. 6 INTRODUCTION Jill Larson Now I’d like to turn the time over to our State Director of Special Education, Mary Hudler.Jill Larson Now I’d like to turn the time over to our State Director of Special Education, Mary Hudler.

7. 7 Introduction Both IDEA and NCLB adjusted to include students with disabilities… April 2007 Regulations New Requirements Develop a new alternate assessment Establish and monitor clear and appropriate guidelines for IEP teams IEP goals based on grade-level content standards Ensure access to grade-level curriculum Mary Hudler Good morning and welcome to this Webinar. As you know, both IDEA and NCLB were amended in 2007 providing States with more flexibility around assessment options including a modified assessment. The federal regulations required the following if a state chose to develop a modified assessment: The state must establish and monitor clear and appropriate guidelines for IEP teams. As the Special Education Division it is our responsibility to provide this guidance. The Division has played an active role in the implementation of the CMA. IEP goals for students participating in the CMA must be based on grade-level content standards. And lastly, IEP teams and schools must ensure that students with disabilities have meaningful access to grade-level curriculum.Mary Hudler Good morning and welcome to this Webinar. As you know, both IDEA and NCLB were amended in 2007 providing States with more flexibility around assessment options including a modified assessment. The federal regulations required the following if a state chose to develop a modified assessment: The state must establish and monitor clear and appropriate guidelines for IEP teams. As the Special Education Division it is our responsibility to provide this guidance. The Division has played an active role in the implementation of the CMA. IEP goals for students participating in the CMA must be based on grade-level content standards. And lastly, IEP teams and schools must ensure that students with disabilities have meaningful access to grade-level curriculum.

8. 8 Introduction Continued… California developed the CMA Special Education Division provided training in 2008 Special Education Consultants worked closely with Standards and Assessment Division Mary Hudler California was eager to take advantage of this flexibility given to states to develop a modified assessment. With almost 700,000 students with disabilities in the state of California we knew that a modified assessment would have a positive impact on the ability of many students with disabilities to demonstrate their knowledge of state content standards in a more appropriate testing format. Therefore, California developed the California Modified Assessment or the CMA which became operational for the first time in grades 3-5 last spring. Because of the stringent federal monitoring requirements that come with this test, I directed my staff to develop training and provide technical assistance to the field in preparation for the first administration of this assessment. My staff worked closely with the Standards and Assessment Division to develop training that would ensure the best possible outcome for the first administration of the CMA.Mary Hudler California was eager to take advantage of this flexibility given to states to develop a modified assessment. With almost 700,000 students with disabilities in the state of California we knew that a modified assessment would have a positive impact on the ability of many students with disabilities to demonstrate their knowledge of state content standards in a more appropriate testing format. Therefore, California developed the California Modified Assessment or the CMA which became operational for the first time in grades 3-5 last spring. Because of the stringent federal monitoring requirements that come with this test, I directed my staff to develop training and provide technical assistance to the field in preparation for the first administration of this assessment. My staff worked closely with the Standards and Assessment Division to develop training that would ensure the best possible outcome for the first administration of the CMA.

9. 9 Acknowledgements District efforts made the first administration of CMA a success Collaborative work of divisions throughout the Department of Education Assistance of the WestEd California Comprehensive Center Mary Hudler I am happy to report that districts had an overwhelmingly positive experience with this first administration. I would like to thank districts who participated last spring for all their hard work to ensure that their students were able to participate in the STAR program in the most appropriate way. I would also like to thank my staff and the staff of the Standards and Assessment Division, and the Policy and Evaluation Division for working collaboratively to ensure that the field was instructed properly on how to administer this test and how to develop students’ IEPs as required by federal regulations. And finally, thanks to the WestEd California Comprehensive Center and their staff for assisting us with this new technology and allowing us to get the word out to you in the field in a more timely and efficient manner. Thanks to all of you for taking time to participate in this Webinar today. I know that this presentation will provide you with the tools necessary to ensure that students with disabilities across the state acquire the content knowledge they will need to compete in a 21st century global economy.Mary Hudler I am happy to report that districts had an overwhelmingly positive experience with this first administration. I would like to thank districts who participated last spring for all their hard work to ensure that their students were able to participate in the STAR program in the most appropriate way. I would also like to thank my staff and the staff of the Standards and Assessment Division, and the Policy and Evaluation Division for working collaboratively to ensure that the field was instructed properly on how to administer this test and how to develop students’ IEPs as required by federal regulations. And finally, thanks to the WestEd California Comprehensive Center and their staff for assisting us with this new technology and allowing us to get the word out to you in the field in a more timely and efficient manner. Thanks to all of you for taking time to participate in this Webinar today. I know that this presentation will provide you with the tools necessary to ensure that students with disabilities across the state acquire the content knowledge they will need to compete in a 21st century global economy.

10. 10 OVERVIEW Jill Larson Thank you Mary. I would like to start with an overview of the purpose of special education. Jill Larson Thank you Mary. I would like to start with an overview of the purpose of special education.

11. 11 Purpose of Special Education Students with disabilities receive: “specially designed instruction…to ensure access of the child to the general curriculum, so that the child can meet the educational standards…that apply to all children.” (34 CFR §300.39(b)(3)(i)(ii)) Jill Larson IDEA requires that students with disabilities be provided with specially designed instruction for the specific purpose of ensuring access to the general education curriculum so that they can meet the same standards as their grade-level peers. This can be accomplished by: Providing access to the curriculum based on grade-level content standards And by providing access to statewide assessments and using assessment results to drive instruction. Doing this will help close the achievement gap. Jill Larson IDEA requires that students with disabilities be provided with specially designed instruction for the specific purpose of ensuring access to the general education curriculum so that they can meet the same standards as their grade-level peers. This can be accomplished by: Providing access to the curriculum based on grade-level content standards And by providing access to statewide assessments and using assessment results to drive instruction. Doing this will help close the achievement gap.

12. 12 The Achievement Gap “Real, measurable progress has been made since the institution of standards-based education…our across-the-board success has still failed to close an achievement gap that threatens the future of our diverse state…children who have traditionally struggled…continue to trail behind their peers, and the gap is not closing. Recognizing this is important. Addressing it is imperative." (Superintendent of Public Instruction, Jack O’Connell, 2008) Jill Larson Closing the achievement gap is one of State Superintendent Jack O’Connell’s critical initiatives. He acknowledges that California is making progress in narrowing the gap, but there are still groups of children who continue to lag behind their peers. One of those groups, and generally the lowest performing sub-group, is students with disabilities. As Superintendent O’Connell says, “Recognizing this is important. Addressing it is imperative.” Jill Larson Closing the achievement gap is one of State Superintendent Jack O’Connell’s critical initiatives. He acknowledges that California is making progress in narrowing the gap, but there are still groups of children who continue to lag behind their peers. One of those groups, and generally the lowest performing sub-group, is students with disabilities. As Superintendent O’Connell says, “Recognizing this is important. Addressing it is imperative.”

13. 13 Ensuring Access Factors for consideration when developing the IEP Least restrictive environment (LRE) Opportunity to learn Standards-based goals Accommodations and modifications Supplementary aides, supports and services Assistive technology Jill Larson We can address the achievement gap by focusing on the following factors when developing each student’s IEP. LRE Identifying the environment in which a student with disabilities will receive instruction in the general education curriculum is a critical step to ensuring access. IDEA does not require that every student with a disability be placed in the regular classroom regardless of individual abilities and needs, but that is why school districts make a range of placement options available, known as a continuum of alternative placements, When a student is placed in the least restrictive environment, the opportunity to access, participate and progress in the general education curriculum increases. This increased opportunity brings us one step closer to closing the achievement gap. OPPORTUNITIES TO LEARN Students with disabilities must be provided an opportunity to learn the curriculum. “An opportunity to learn refers to equal opportunities within the school or classroom that promote learning for ALL students. Barriers that prevent learning are eliminated. Opportunity to learn includes equal access to the curriculum, textbooks, facilities, teachers, and instructional opportunities that enable ALL students to achieve high standards.” GOALS IEP goals should be standards-based. Michael Hock reminds us “Doesn’t it make sense to design IEPs that help students meet standards so they can do their best on standards-based assessments, pass from grade to grade and eventually graduate, and in the process help prove that their schools and teachers were indeed accountable?” (Hock, 2000) In Resources - Discussed in detail later. ACCOMMODATIONS The use of accommodations paired with research-based instructional strategies and curriculum can assist students with disabilities to effectively engage in learning the general education curriculum content. When appropriate accommodations and/or modifications are included in the development of grade-level, standards-based goals, they can provide the student with access to and ensure progress in the general education curriculum. One of the resources for this Webinar is the Access Center’s “Strategies to Improve Access to the General Education Curriculum.” This is an excellent resource as these are strategies that have proven effective specifically for students with disabilities. SUPPLEMENTARY AIDS… When supplementary aids, supports and services are carefully considered for each child, the opportunities for access, participation and progress in the general education curriculum increase. Once the doors to the content standards have been unlocked, the child is on the way toward mastery and improved achievement which narrows the achievement gap. ASSISTIVE TECHONOLOGY Some students with disabilities also require the use of assistive technology (AT) in order to access the general education curriculum. The use of technology can go a long way toward circumventing the limitations of a disability and provide students with disabilities with a "level playing field" and close the achievement gap for all students. We hope to provide you with some information and tools today that will help you address the achievement gap for students in your districts. Jill Larson We can address the achievement gap by focusing on the following factors when developing each student’s IEP. LRE Identifying the environment in which a student with disabilities will receive instruction in the general education curriculum is a critical step to ensuring access. IDEA does not require that every student with a disability be placed in the regular classroom regardless of individual abilities and needs, but that is why school districts make a range of placement options available, known as a continuum of alternative placements, When a student is placed in the least restrictive environment, the opportunity to access, participate and progress in the general education curriculum increases. This increased opportunity brings us one step closer to closing the achievement gap. OPPORTUNITIES TO LEARN Students with disabilities must be provided an opportunity to learn the curriculum. “An opportunity to learn refers to equal opportunities within the school or classroom that promote learning for ALL students. Barriers that prevent learning are eliminated. Opportunity to learn includes equal access to the curriculum, textbooks, facilities, teachers, and instructional opportunities that enable ALL students to achieve high standards.” GOALS IEP goals should be standards-based. Michael Hock reminds us “Doesn’t it make sense to design IEPs that help students meet standards so they can do their best on standards-based assessments, pass from grade to grade and eventually graduate, and in the process help prove that their schools and teachers were indeed accountable?” (Hock, 2000) In Resources - Discussed in detail later. ACCOMMODATIONS The use of accommodations paired with research-based instructional strategies and curriculum can assist students with disabilities to effectively engage in learning the general education curriculum content. When appropriate accommodations and/or modifications are included in the development of grade-level, standards-based goals, they can provide the student with access to and ensure progress in the general education curriculum. One of the resources for this Webinar is the Access Center’s “Strategies to Improve Access to the General Education Curriculum.” This is an excellent resource as these are strategies that have proven effective specifically for students with disabilities. SUPPLEMENTARY AIDS… When supplementary aids, supports and services are carefully considered for each child, the opportunities for access, participation and progress in the general education curriculum increase. Once the doors to the content standards have been unlocked, the child is on the way toward mastery and improved achievement which narrows the achievement gap. ASSISTIVE TECHONOLOGY Some students with disabilities also require the use of assistive technology (AT) in order to access the general education curriculum. The use of technology can go a long way toward circumventing the limitations of a disability and provide students with disabilities with a "level playing field" and close the achievement gap for all students. We hope to provide you with some information and tools today that will help you address the achievement gap for students in your districts.

14. 14 Jill Larson This slide shows a graphic with three circles showing factors contributing to access which results in closing the achievement gap. IEPS designed to give students access to the general education curriculum and opportunities to learn content contribute to students being able to access assessments and demonstrate what they have learned, thus closing the achievement gap. As you can see ACCESS = ACHIEVEMENTJill Larson This slide shows a graphic with three circles showing factors contributing to access which results in closing the achievement gap. IEPS designed to give students access to the general education curriculum and opportunities to learn content contribute to students being able to access assessments and demonstrate what they have learned, thus closing the achievement gap. As you can see ACCESS = ACHIEVEMENT

15. 15 THE STAR PROGRAM Jill Larson Standardized Testing and Reporting Program IDEA requires that IEP teams have a clear understanding of statewide assessments, in California this is the STAR program.This is important to ensure that IEP teams make informed decisions when choosing the most appropriate assessment for each child with disabilities.Jill Larson Standardized Testing and Reporting Program IDEA requires that IEP teams have a clear understanding of statewide assessments, in California this is the STAR program.This is important to ensure that IEP teams make informed decisions when choosing the most appropriate assessment for each child with disabilities.

16. 16 The STAR Program All students in grades two through eleven must participate, including students with disabilities Measures how well students are achieving the California Content Standards Provides information about how well schools and school districts are meeting accountability requirements Jill Larson Students participate in the STAR program beginning in grade two and continuing through grade 11. The purpose of the STAR program is to measure how well students are meeting the content standards and how schools and districts are meeting accountability requirements. Jill Larson Students participate in the STAR program beginning in grade two and continuing through grade 11. The purpose of the STAR program is to measure how well students are meeting the content standards and how schools and districts are meeting accountability requirements.

17. 17 Poll #1 We are pausing now and take a poll. Did you administer the CMA last Spring? Yes or No Meredith CathcartMeredith Cathcart

18. 18 The STAR Program California Standards Test (CST) California Modified Assessment (CMA) California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA) Standards-based Test in Spanish (STS) Jill Larson The STAR Program consists of four main assessments The CST – the California Standards Test - Aligned to Grade-level standards The CMA – the California Modified Assessment - The alignment of the CMA with grade-level content standards is the foundation of this assessment and must cover the same content as the CST The CAPA – the California Alternate Performance Assessment - Unlike the CST and CMA which are closely aligned to grade-level standards the CAPA is linked to grade-level content standards, but does not represent the full range of grade-level content The STS – the Standards-based Test in Spanish - Aligned to Grade-level standards Today, we will be focusing on the CST, CMA and CAPAJill Larson The STAR Program consists of four main assessments The CST – the California Standards Test - Aligned to Grade-level standards The CMA – the California Modified Assessment - The alignment of the CMA with grade-level content standards is the foundation of this assessment and must cover the same content as the CST The CAPA – the California Alternate Performance Assessment - Unlike the CST and CMA which are closely aligned to grade-level standards the CAPA is linked to grade-level content standards, but does not represent the full range of grade-level content The STS – the Standards-based Test in Spanish - Aligned to Grade-level standards Today, we will be focusing on the CST, CMA and CAPA

19. 19 Jill Larson Slide #19 Approximately 4.7 million students in California took the CST. Approximately 350,000 are students with disabilities; 38,000 students, grades 3-5 took the CMA and approximately 35,000 students took the CAPA - , CST Most students with IEPS participate in the CST, grades two through eleven. These students have disabilities that have little impact on their cognitive functioning. Students with IEP’s may take the CST with or without accommodations and/or modifications If a student takes the CST with accommodations and/or modifications, they should be those that are regularly used in the classroom. It is also required that any accommodations and/or modifications used during statewide assessment must be documented in the IEP. For guidance on accommodations and modifications refer to the Test Variations Matrix that is posted in the Resources for this Webinar. CMA Some students will participate in the CMA, grades three through eight, this spring, 2009. Students with disabilities who cannot demonstrate their proficiency on the general assessment may be able to participate in the CMA. IEP teams must follow the State Board adopted participation criteria when determining if the CMA is appropriate for a student. CMA Participation Criteria is posted in the Resources for this Webinar. Students with 504 Plans cannot participate in the CMA. Students are allowed to take the CMA with any accommodations that are documented in their IEP. Accommodations should be those regularly used by the student in the classroom. Because the CMA is already modified, modifications are not allowed on this assessment. Refer to the Test Variations Matrix for the CMA, posed in the Resources, for guidance. These will be revised in November to include grades 6-8. CAPA A few students will participate in the CAPA, grades two through eleven. The CAPA is intended to make grade-level content accessible for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who cannot demonstrate proficiency on the general assessment even with accommodations and/or modifications. Determining eligibility to participate in the CAPA can be guided by the California Alternate Performance Assessment Participation Criteria which is posted as one of the resources for this Webinar. Accommodations and modifications are not used on the CAPA, but there is a list of core adaptations that can be used when administering the CAPA. This document is also posted as a resource for this Webinar. Jill Larson Slide #19 Approximately 4.7 million students in California took the CST. Approximately 350,000 are students with disabilities; 38,000 students, grades 3-5 took the CMA and approximately 35,000 students took the CAPA - , CST Most students with IEPS participate in the CST, grades two through eleven. These students have disabilities that have little impact on their cognitive functioning. Students with IEP’s may take the CST with or without accommodations and/or modifications If a student takes the CST with accommodations and/or modifications, they should be those that are regularly used in the classroom. It is also required that any accommodations and/or modifications used during statewide assessment must be documented in the IEP. For guidance on accommodations and modifications refer to the Test Variations Matrix that is posted in the Resources for this Webinar. CMA Some students will participate in the CMA, grades three through eight, this spring, 2009. Students with disabilities who cannot demonstrate their proficiency on the general assessment may be able to participate in the CMA. IEP teams must follow the State Board adopted participation criteria when determining if the CMA is appropriate for a student. CMA Participation Criteria is posted in the Resources for this Webinar. Students with 504 Plans cannot participate in the CMA. Students are allowed to take the CMA with any accommodations that are documented in their IEP. Accommodations should be those regularly used by the student in the classroom. Because the CMA is already modified, modifications are not allowed on this assessment. Refer to the Test Variations Matrix for the CMA, posed in the Resources, for guidance. These will be revised in November to include grades 6-8. CAPA A few students will participate in the CAPA, grades two through eleven. The CAPA is intended to make grade-level content accessible for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who cannot demonstrate proficiency on the general assessment even with accommodations and/or modifications. Determining eligibility to participate in the CAPA can be guided by the California Alternate Performance Assessment Participation Criteria which is posted as one of the resources for this Webinar. Accommodations and modifications are not used on the CAPA, but there is a list of core adaptations that can be used when administering the CAPA. This document is also posted as a resource for this Webinar.

20. 20 Assessment Blueprints The content standards chosen to be tested are identified in the assessment blueprints which can be found on the CDE Web site: CST Blueprints: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/blueprints.asp CMA Blueprints: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/cmablueprints.asp CAPA Blueprints: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/capablueprints.asp Jill Larson Each of the assessments in the STAR Program are developed from assessment blueprints. The blueprints identify which content standards will be assessed. The blueprints were developed by focus groups from the field and approved by the State Board of Education. A blueprint for each assessment can be found at the following Web sites. You also have a copy posted on the list of resources for this Webinar. It is critical that IEP teams become familiar with the assessment blueprints. These blueprints will guide your development of grade-level, standards-based goals as determined by student need. Focusing on standards will provide the student with the greatest opportunity to access the general education curriculum.Jill Larson Each of the assessments in the STAR Program are developed from assessment blueprints. The blueprints identify which content standards will be assessed. The blueprints were developed by focus groups from the field and approved by the State Board of Education. A blueprint for each assessment can be found at the following Web sites. You also have a copy posted on the list of resources for this Webinar. It is critical that IEP teams become familiar with the assessment blueprints. These blueprints will guide your development of grade-level, standards-based goals as determined by student need. Focusing on standards will provide the student with the greatest opportunity to access the general education curriculum.

21. 21 Participation in STAR Students with disabilities participate in the STAR program in the following ways: CST, with or without accommodations and/or modifications CMA with or without accommodations CST and CMA combined – subject specific CAPA only Jill Larson These are the ways in which a student with disabilities with an IEP can participate in the STAR Program. They can take the CST in all subject areas with or without accommodations and/or modifications. Or they can take the CMA in all subject areas with or without accommodations. Since the CMA is already a modified assessment, no additional modifications are allowed. Or they can take a combination of the CST and the CMA – subject area specific. For example, they may take the CST for Math and the CMA for ELA and Science. Or they may participate in the CAPA. A student who takes the CAPA must do so in all subject areas. They cannot take a combination of the CAPA and the CST or CMA.Jill Larson These are the ways in which a student with disabilities with an IEP can participate in the STAR Program. They can take the CST in all subject areas with or without accommodations and/or modifications. Or they can take the CMA in all subject areas with or without accommodations. Since the CMA is already a modified assessment, no additional modifications are allowed. Or they can take a combination of the CST and the CMA – subject area specific. For example, they may take the CST for Math and the CMA for ELA and Science. Or they may participate in the CAPA. A student who takes the CAPA must do so in all subject areas. They cannot take a combination of the CAPA and the CST or CMA.

22. 22 Jill Larson Last spring was the first administration of the CMA in grades 3-5. This spring, the ELA portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 3-8. The math portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 3-7. There will be no grade 8 Math or Algebra I test for CMA at this time. Eighth students will take either the CST general math test or the CST Algebra I test. The science portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 5 and 8. And the writing portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 4 and 7. Jill Larson Last spring was the first administration of the CMA in grades 3-5. This spring, the ELA portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 3-8. The math portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 3-7. There will be no grade 8 Math or Algebra I test for CMA at this time. Eighth students will take either the CST general math test or the CST Algebra I test. The science portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 5 and 8. And the writing portion of the CMA will be offered to students in grades 4 and 7.

23. 23 Jill Larson In 2010, grades 9 and 10 will become operational. And in 2011, grade 11 will become operational. Jill Larson In 2010, grades 9 and 10 will become operational. And in 2011, grade 11 will become operational.

24. 24 2008 CMA Test Materials Grade 3 Test Booklets (scannable) Directions for Administration Grades 4 to 8 Test Booklet CST/CMA Combined Answer Document Directions for Administration Jill Larson Grade 3 test booklets will continue to be scannable. Test booklets for grades 4 to 8 will have a separate answer document. The answer document will have the CST on one side and the CMA on the opposing side. Test administrators should make sure that students are using the correct portion of the answer document. Guidance for how to manage the answer document situation are provided in the DFA – Directions for Administration. Jill Larson Grade 3 test booklets will continue to be scannable. Test booklets for grades 4 to 8 will have a separate answer document. The answer document will have the CST on one side and the CMA on the opposing side. Test administrators should make sure that students are using the correct portion of the answer document. Guidance for how to manage the answer document situation are provided in the DFA – Directions for Administration.

25. 25 Jill Larson On this slide we see the answer document, On the left is an image of the front page, in the middle are the inside pages showing the CST answer document on the left and the CMA answer document on the right. On the far right is the back page of the answer document. Jill Larson On this slide we see the answer document, On the left is an image of the front page, in the middle are the inside pages showing the CST answer document on the left and the CMA answer document on the right. On the far right is the back page of the answer document.

26. 26 Jill Larson This slide shows a closer image of the inside of the answer document. On the left is an image of the CST answer document. On the right is an image of the CMA answer document. The CMA side of the answer document provides alternating shaded rows to help the students track their answers.Jill Larson This slide shows a closer image of the inside of the answer document. On the left is an image of the CST answer document. On the right is an image of the CMA answer document. The CMA side of the answer document provides alternating shaded rows to help the students track their answers.

27. 27 Comparison of Test Items Standard passage length Customary use of white space Standard font size – Times Four answer choices Shortened passage length Additional white space Larger font size – Helvetica Three answer choices Graphics for most items Jill Larson This slide shows two boxes. The CST descriptions are on the left and the CMA descriptions are on the right. The CMA differs from the CST in format. The CMA has shorter reading passages, additional white space, larger font size, three instead of four answer choices and uses graphics for most items. You can get an idea from the sample items I am about to show you. But for a closer look, these sample items are also posted as a resource for this Webinar.Jill Larson This slide shows two boxes. The CST descriptions are on the left and the CMA descriptions are on the right. The CMA differs from the CST in format. The CMA has shorter reading passages, additional white space, larger font size, three instead of four answer choices and uses graphics for most items. You can get an idea from the sample items I am about to show you. But for a closer look, these sample items are also posted as a resource for this Webinar.

28. 28 Jill Larson This slide shows an image of sample reading items, with CST on the left and CMA on the right. You can see that the CMA passage is much shorter than the CST giving more white space to the page.Jill Larson This slide shows an image of sample reading items, with CST on the left and CMA on the right. You can see that the CMA passage is much shorter than the CST giving more white space to the page.

29. 29 Jill Larson This slide is an image of sample math items, with the CST on the left and the CMA on the right. The CMA math item has fewer words and the problems are presented in one column instead of two.Jill Larson This slide is an image of sample math items, with the CST on the left and the CMA on the right. The CMA math item has fewer words and the problems are presented in one column instead of two.

30. 30 Jill Larson This slide is an image of sample science items, with the CST on the left and the CMA on the right. This science item shows the use of graphics on the CMA.Jill Larson This slide is an image of sample science items, with the CST on the left and the CMA on the right. This science item shows the use of graphics on the CMA.

31. 31 CMA Logistics One answer document for students taking CST and CMA Different administration instructions for CST and CMA Separate testing rooms for students who need read aloud Timing of CD vs live read aloud Jill Larson Slide 31 Because of the unique accommodations available to students for the CMA, there are several things to consider when administering it to a group of students. Test administrators need to be aware of the side-by-side CST/CMA answer document and be prepared to monitor the students to ensure they are using the correct side of the answer document. The test administrator also needs to be aware that there are different instructions for the CST and CMA. This makes it difficult to test students taking the CST and students taking the CMA in the same room. Since read aloud is offered as an accommodation for the CMA, students needing read aloud on the CMA may need to be in a different room than those who are not using read aloud on the CMA or are taking the CST. You may not want to use a CD for read aloud and a teacher or aide read aloud in the same room, there may be a conflict in timing. Taking the CMA can be a positive experience for students with disabilities if the test administration is managed properly. Final date for ordering testing materials from the contractor is Dec. 1. Contact your testing coordinators to determine your own district timelines. Jill Larson Slide 31 Because of the unique accommodations available to students for the CMA, there are several things to consider when administering it to a group of students. Test administrators need to be aware of the side-by-side CST/CMA answer document and be prepared to monitor the students to ensure they are using the correct side of the answer document. The test administrator also needs to be aware that there are different instructions for the CST and CMA. This makes it difficult to test students taking the CST and students taking the CMA in the same room. Since read aloud is offered as an accommodation for the CMA, students needing read aloud on the CMA may need to be in a different room than those who are not using read aloud on the CMA or are taking the CST. You may not want to use a CD for read aloud and a teacher or aide read aloud in the same room, there may be a conflict in timing. Taking the CMA can be a positive experience for students with disabilities if the test administration is managed properly. Final date for ordering testing materials from the contractor is Dec. 1. Contact your testing coordinators to determine your own district timelines.

32. 32 Open Response Please share your comments What other logistical challenges did you face or what do you anticipate? When you finish please take a moment to post your questions, if you haven’t already done so. Jill Larson TRANSITION Jill Larson TRANSITION

33. 33 IEP REQUIREMENTS Meredith Cathcart Slide 33 The changes in statewide assessments means changes in IEP requirements as well. We are talking about IEPs because the changes in regulations in relation to statewide assessments and participation criteria are required to be documented on the IEP. Each year new student populations are being included in the CMA as assessments become operational. The requirements need to be addressed at each of the grade-levels.This year grades 6, 7,and 8 are added, and next year we will be adding 9 and 10. So in we need to have the IEPs ready to address the CMA for those students for who this will be the most appropriate assessment. We need to plan ahead for our 9th and 10th graders who will need to have this addressed as early as this spring. In this section we will: Suggest guidance to IEP teams Outline the CMA Participation Criteria Discuss IEP team decision-making Provide guidance for writing grade-level, standards-based goals The IEP is a key document in designing access to the general education curriculum and instructional strategies to benefit the student. Meredith Cathcart Slide 33 The changes in statewide assessments means changes in IEP requirements as well. We are talking about IEPs because the changes in regulations in relation to statewide assessments and participation criteria are required to be documented on the IEP. Each year new student populations are being included in the CMA as assessments become operational. The requirements need to be addressed at each of the grade-levels.This year grades 6, 7,and 8 are added, and next year we will be adding 9 and 10. So in we need to have the IEPs ready to address the CMA for those students for who this will be the most appropriate assessment. We need to plan ahead for our 9th and 10th graders who will need to have this addressed as early as this spring. In this section we will: Suggest guidance to IEP teams Outline the CMA Participation Criteria Discuss IEP team decision-making Provide guidance for writing grade-level, standards-based goals The IEP is a key document in designing access to the general education curriculum and instructional strategies to benefit the student.

34. 34 New Federal Requirements Addition of CMA and its participation criteria A state may develop a new alternate assessment or adapt an assessment based on grade-level modified academic achievement standards 34 CFR § 200.6 (a) (ii) (B)(3). More complex decisions about statewide assessments States must provide IEP teams with a clear explanation of the differences between assessments 34CFR § 200.1 (f)(B)(iii). For alternate assessments based on modified or alternate achievement standards, the student’s IEP must include goals for a subject assessed under 34CFR § 200.2. Meredith Cathcart Slide 34 As noted in the beginning of this presentation there are new federal regulations that have implications for IEPs. First There is the addition of the CMA and State Board adopted participation criteria. Because this is a statewide assessment requirements around the CMA need to be addressed in the IEP. Second States shall establish and monitor clear guidelines for IEP teams - our work as a State is to monitor and provide guidelines to support these new requirements. These requirements are monitored through the submission of data from the IEP and through self and verifications reviews. Guidelines presented on how to make decisions about statewide assessments for students with disabilities are suggestions for IEP teams to consider. What is in law has to be followed. Third the law address what the student needs to have in place in order to be eligible for the CMA. This is outlined in the participation criteria and addresses student performance on statewide assessments, access to and progress in the general education curriculum, considering multiple sources of evidence and having grade-level, standards-based goals on the IEP. Here is a comment from the regulations: The requirement that a student be receiving grade level instruction was intended to ensure that students identified to be assessed on (the CMA) have access to grade-level content. It goes on to say…it is critical to ensure that students who participate in (the CMA) receive instruction in grade-level content so that they are prepared to demonstrate their mastery of grade-level content…and can move closer to grade-level achievement. Meredith Cathcart Slide 34 As noted in the beginning of this presentation there are new federal regulations that have implications for IEPs. First There is the addition of the CMA and State Board adopted participation criteria. Because this is a statewide assessment requirements around the CMA need to be addressed in the IEP. Second States shall establish and monitor clear guidelines for IEP teams - our work as a State is to monitor and provide guidelines to support these new requirements. These requirements are monitored through the submission of data from the IEP and through self and verifications reviews. Guidelines presented on how to make decisions about statewide assessments for students with disabilities are suggestions for IEP teams to consider. What is in law has to be followed. Third the law address what the student needs to have in place in order to be eligible for the CMA. This is outlined in the participation criteria and addresses student performance on statewide assessments, access to and progress in the general education curriculum, considering multiple sources of evidence and having grade-level, standards-based goals on the IEP. Here is a comment from the regulations: The requirement that a student be receiving grade level instruction was intended to ensure that students identified to be assessed on (the CMA) have access to grade-level content. It goes on to say…it is critical to ensure that students who participate in (the CMA) receive instruction in grade-level content so that they are prepared to demonstrate their mastery of grade-level content…and can move closer to grade-level achievement.

35. 35 CMA Participation Criteria Adopted by the SBE in November 2007 Previous participation Progress based on multiple measures and objective evidence Response to appropriate instruction High school diploma Parents are informed Meredith Cathcart Slide 35 A complete copy of the State Board adopted CMA Participation Criteria is listed as a resource for this Webinar, but I will go over each of the criterion now. Previous Participation The student must have participated in CST in a previous year and scored Below Basic or Far Below Basic (in any subject) OR The student must have participated in CAPA (Levels 2–5) in two previous years and scored either Proficient or Advanced (in any subject) Progress Based On Multiple Measures and Objective Evidence Evidence is based on results from multiple, valid, and objective measures of student progress Response To Appropriate Instruction Does the student have access to the curriculum, including instruction and materials for the grade in which the student is enrolled? Does the IEP have grade-level California content standards-based goals and support in the classroom for a subject or subjects assessed by the CMA? Are there special education and related services to support access to and progress in the general curriculum in which the student is enrolled? Does the IEP team make the determination that the student will not achieve grade-level proficiency even with instructional intervention, within the year of the IEP? High School Diploma Not precluded from attempting to complete requirements for a regular high school diploma \Parents Are Informed Parents are informed that their child’s achievement will be measured based on modified achievement standards. Parents are specifically addressed in statue because of the important roll they play as a Meredith Cathcart Slide 35 A complete copy of the State Board adopted CMA Participation Criteria is listed as a resource for this Webinar, but I will go over each of the criterion now. Previous Participation The student must have participated in CST in a previous year and scored Below Basic or Far Below Basic (in any subject) OR The student must have participated in CAPA (Levels 2–5) in two previous years and scored either Proficient or Advanced (in any subject) Progress Based On Multiple Measures and Objective Evidence Evidence is based on results from multiple, valid, and objective measures of student progress Response To Appropriate Instruction Does the student have access to the curriculum, including instruction and materials for the grade in which the student is enrolled? Does the IEP have grade-level California content standards-based goals and support in the classroom for a subject or subjects assessed by the CMA? Are there special education and related services to support access to and progress in the general curriculum in which the student is enrolled? Does the IEP team make the determination that the student will not achieve grade-level proficiency even with instructional intervention, within the year of the IEP? High School Diploma Not precluded from attempting to complete requirements for a regular high school diploma \Parents Are Informed Parents are informed that their child’s achievement will be measured based on modified achievement standards. Parents are specifically addressed in statue because of the important roll they play as a

36. 36 Meredith Cathcart This slide has a graphic with a box on the left with elements of the participation criteria. An arrow is leading from the box to a circle in the middle showing the IEP team process, on the right are three arrows leading to three boxes labeled CST, CMA and CAPA. The elements of the CMA participation criteria is a guide for making good decisions about student participation in the statewide assessments. The criteria holds key considerations that are naturally apart of the IEP process. These are elements we routinely consider in determining the supports and services a student needs to make progress and have access to the general education curriculum. This graphic depicts how using the elements of the CMA Participation Criteria makes its way through the IEP team decision process which leads to the selection of assessments. Meredith Cathcart This slide has a graphic with a box on the left with elements of the participation criteria. An arrow is leading from the box to a circle in the middle showing the IEP team process, on the right are three arrows leading to three boxes labeled CST, CMA and CAPA. The elements of the CMA participation criteria is a guide for making good decisions about student participation in the statewide assessments. The criteria holds key considerations that are naturally apart of the IEP process. These are elements we routinely consider in determining the supports and services a student needs to make progress and have access to the general education curriculum. This graphic depicts how using the elements of the CMA Participation Criteria makes its way through the IEP team decision process which leads to the selection of assessments.

37. 37 Meredith Cathcart This slide shows a box on the left showing what is missing for students in the GAP. In the middle are three boxes name the three assessments and identify the GAP. The box on the right gives point for closing the GAP. We want students with disabilities to have the opportunity to be with their same aged peers in general education classrooms and have access to grade level content, and to participate in the statewide assessment, that their same aged peers take, to the extent possible. We know that this is not possible for all students with disabilities so we have some alternatives - the CMA and the CAPA. When we look at how students participate in statewide assessments and we apply the Participation Criteria we see that is missing for some students? Some students fall into a GAP. These students fall in the GAP because they do not have access to grade-level content, thus not having the knowledge to access the assessment and end up taking the CST -.the hardest assessment. GAP stands for Goals, Achievement and Progress. We can close the GAP by employing strategies and opportunities to learn. We want students to move toward having access to the general education curriculum and be given the opportunity to learn grade-level content through the crafting of the IEP, accommodations, modifications and goals. Goals equal achievement and progress. We can close the GAP by employing strategies and opportunities to learn. Meredith Cathcart This slide shows a box on the left showing what is missing for students in the GAP. In the middle are three boxes name the three assessments and identify the GAP. The box on the right gives point for closing the GAP. We want students with disabilities to have the opportunity to be with their same aged peers in general education classrooms and have access to grade level content, and to participate in the statewide assessment, that their same aged peers take, to the extent possible. We know that this is not possible for all students with disabilities so we have some alternatives - the CMA and the CAPA. When we look at how students participate in statewide assessments and we apply the Participation Criteria we see that is missing for some students? Some students fall into a GAP. These students fall in the GAP because they do not have access to grade-level content, thus not having the knowledge to access the assessment and end up taking the CST -.the hardest assessment. GAP stands for Goals, Achievement and Progress. We can close the GAP by employing strategies and opportunities to learn. We want students to move toward having access to the general education curriculum and be given the opportunity to learn grade-level content through the crafting of the IEP, accommodations, modifications and goals. Goals equal achievement and progress. We can close the GAP by employing strategies and opportunities to learn.

38. 38 How Students Participate In STAR Students with disabilities participate in the STAR program in the following ways: CST, with or without accommodations and/or modifications CMA with or without accommodations CST and CMA combined – subject specific CAPA only Meredith Cathcart These are the ways that students may participate in the STAR program. As mentioned before this is an IEP team decision. After considering the CMA participation criteria, CAPA Eligibility Criteria, and the Matrix of Test Variations, the IEP team decides which assessment will be the most appropriate. CST, with or without accommodations and/or modifications CMA with or without accommodations CST and CMA combined – subject specific CAPA only Meredith Cathcart These are the ways that students may participate in the STAR program. As mentioned before this is an IEP team decision. After considering the CMA participation criteria, CAPA Eligibility Criteria, and the Matrix of Test Variations, the IEP team decides which assessment will be the most appropriate. CST, with or without accommodations and/or modifications CMA with or without accommodations CST and CMA combined – subject specific CAPA only

39. 39 Steps to Decision-Making Determine how students participated in the STAR program in a previous year Collect objective evidence based on multiple measures Evaluate student response to appropriate instruction Select the appropriate assessment Document decisions on the IEP Meredith Cathcart These are the basic steps to IEP team decision making when it comes to statewide assessments in the STAR program. Determine how the student participated in previous years 2. Use the present levels of performance to help inform how the student is progressing based on multiple measures, classroom performance and tests, eligibility assessments. 3.Evaluate student response to appropriate instruction What progress are they making? Do they have access to grade level content and instruction? Do they have grade-level, standards-based goals Select the appropriate assessment – CST, CMA or CAPA Consider the CST first - the assessment that most students take 5. Document in the IEP which assessment and which content area the student will participate in. For CAPA, you will need to document which level, I-V. Meredith Cathcart These are the basic steps to IEP team decision making when it comes to statewide assessments in the STAR program. Determine how the student participated in previous years 2. Use the present levels of performance to help inform how the student is progressing based on multiple measures, classroom performance and tests, eligibility assessments. 3.Evaluate student response to appropriate instruction What progress are they making? Do they have access to grade level content and instruction? Do they have grade-level, standards-based goals Select the appropriate assessment – CST, CMA or CAPA Consider the CST first - the assessment that most students take 5. Document in the IEP which assessment and which content area the student will participate in. For CAPA, you will need to document which level, I-V.

40. 40 IEP Documentation Must indicate which assessment Must consider accommodations and modifications Must document supports and services that provide access Must include grade-level, standards-based goals for CMA Meredith Cathcart Documentation of Statewide Assessments on the IEP is required by IDEA and on CASEMIS fields (California Special Education Management Information System) The IEP must indicate which assessment, and in which content area the student will be assessed or in which CAPA Level they will be assessed. Accommodations and/or modifications need to be documented in the IEP as well. It is important that the IEP team understands accommodations for use in the classroom and accommodations for use on assessments. Special education supports and services providing access to the general education curriculum must also be included in the IEP For the CMA in particular the IEP must have grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed Meredith Cathcart Documentation of Statewide Assessments on the IEP is required by IDEA and on CASEMIS fields (California Special Education Management Information System) The IEP must indicate which assessment, and in which content area the student will be assessed or in which CAPA Level they will be assessed. Accommodations and/or modifications need to be documented in the IEP as well. It is important that the IEP team understands accommodations for use in the classroom and accommodations for use on assessments. Special education supports and services providing access to the general education curriculum must also be included in the IEP For the CMA in particular the IEP must have grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed

41. 41 Accommodations Changes in the way a student accesses learning that does not change the actual content of the standard Jill Larson Accommodations and/or modifications are used to provide access. This is a basic definition.Jill Larson Accommodations and/or modifications are used to provide access. This is a basic definition.

42. 42 Using Accommodations and Modifications Increase Access By: Addressing learning style differences Providing access to grade-level instruction and assessments Improving academic performance Helping students demonstrate their skills and knowledge on assessments Jill Larson Using accommodations can give students access to the general education curriculum and provide opportunities to learn content as well as participate in the general education classroom. Jill Larson Using accommodations can give students access to the general education curriculum and provide opportunities to learn content as well as participate in the general education classroom.

43. 43 Instructional Accommodations Extra time Calculator Responses dictated Test read aloud Special lighting Use of table or formulas Braille large print Use of word processor Frequent breaks Math manipulatives Adaptive furniture Test separately Magnifying equipment Audio amplification Jill Larson This slide illustrates examples of instructional accommodations. There are two boxes that list accommodations. All of these accommodations, and more, can be used in the classroom to make grade-level curriculum accessible.Jill Larson This slide illustrates examples of instructional accommodations. There are two boxes that list accommodations. All of these accommodations, and more, can be used in the classroom to make grade-level curriculum accessible.

44. 44 Some instructional accommodations are modifications on assessments Extra time Calculator Responses dictated Test read aloud Special lighting Use of table or formulas Braille large print Use of word processor Frequent breaks Adaptive furniture Math manipulatives Test separately Magnifying equipment Audio amplification Jill Larson This slide shows the same two boxes, but some of the accommodations have turned red, indicating that when used on statewide assessments they will be considered modifications. IEP teams need to keep in mind that accommodations commonly used in the classroom may be considered modifications when used on statewide assessments. This is critical, as modifications impact school and district AYP determinations. It is also very important that the accommodation is implemented in the classroom so students are comfortable with the accommodation when they use it on assessments. Note: The use of calculators is an accommodation on the CMA for 5th grade and above. Jill Larson This slide shows the same two boxes, but some of the accommodations have turned red, indicating that when used on statewide assessments they will be considered modifications. IEP teams need to keep in mind that accommodations commonly used in the classroom may be considered modifications when used on statewide assessments. This is critical, as modifications impact school and district AYP determinations. It is also very important that the accommodation is implemented in the classroom so students are comfortable with the accommodation when they use it on assessments. Note: The use of calculators is an accommodation on the CMA for 5th grade and above.

45. 45 Poll #2 Please answer the following question. How may of you have used the following resources when providing accommodations? Matrix of Test Variations Tech Matrix Web site Clearing house Jill Larson TRANSITIONJill Larson TRANSITION

46. 46 Legal Requirements The IEP must include a statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals… 34 CFR §300.320(a)(2)(i) An IEP for students assessed on the CMA must include grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed. 34 CFR § 200.2 (f)(2) Meredith Cathcart What does the law say about IEP goals? IDEA 2004 states that the IEP must include a statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals. NCLB specifically addresses goals in the IEP in relation to the modified assessment and requires that any student participating in the modified assessment must have grade-level, standards-based goals in the subjects being assessed.Meredith Cathcart What does the law say about IEP goals? IDEA 2004 states that the IEP must include a statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals. NCLB specifically addresses goals in the IEP in relation to the modified assessment and requires that any student participating in the modified assessment must have grade-level, standards-based goals in the subjects being assessed.

47. 47 Developing Grade-level, Standards-based Goals Locate the student’s present level of performance Choose the standards Unpack the standards Identify skills for further development Consider the rate of learning Write the annual goal Meredith Cathcart Slide 47 The Steps to setting IEP Grade-level, standards-based goals are a guide through the process of goal writing. First the IEP team should locate the student’s present levels of performance. This should be accomplished by utilizing multiple measures including the STAR assessment scores, school-wide screening measures, benchmark assessments, curriculum-based measures, as well as observational information. Information should also be obtained from parents and all other teachers or specialists that work with the child. Secondly, selection of the standards to address in the goals is based on student needs established in the present levels of performance. Using the assessments blueprints assists in selection of standards to be considered. Third, carefully consider the entire standard and decide if the student’s area of need includes all of a particular standard or only part(s) of the standard. Based on this knowledge, the key area of the standard can be targeted for the goal. This is called unpacking the standards. Fourth, the IEP team may determine that the student is lacking certain prerequisite skills, such as more work with decoding. The team may decide that a goal needs to be addressed in this area as well and may write a prerequisite goal. Fifth, the IEP team should consider the student’s rate of learning. Determine what this student can reasonably accomplish within the year. Keep in mind that the student may need intensive intervention and instruction in order to make progress through the standards. And lastly, the IEP team will write the annual goal. Well-written goals should communicate the same intended outcome to whoever reads it. Meredith Cathcart Slide 47 The Steps to setting IEP Grade-level, standards-based goals are a guide through the process of goal writing. First the IEP team should locate the student’s present levels of performance. This should be accomplished by utilizing multiple measures including the STAR assessment scores, school-wide screening measures, benchmark assessments, curriculum-based measures, as well as observational information. Information should also be obtained from parents and all other teachers or specialists that work with the child. Secondly, selection of the standards to address in the goals is based on student needs established in the present levels of performance. Using the assessments blueprints assists in selection of standards to be considered. Third, carefully consider the entire standard and decide if the student’s area of need includes all of a particular standard or only part(s) of the standard. Based on this knowledge, the key area of the standard can be targeted for the goal. This is called unpacking the standards. Fourth, the IEP team may determine that the student is lacking certain prerequisite skills, such as more work with decoding. The team may decide that a goal needs to be addressed in this area as well and may write a prerequisite goal. Fifth, the IEP team should consider the student’s rate of learning. Determine what this student can reasonably accomplish within the year. Keep in mind that the student may need intensive intervention and instruction in order to make progress through the standards. And lastly, the IEP team will write the annual goal. Well-written goals should communicate the same intended outcome to whoever reads it.

48. 48 Meredith Cathcart We are always trying to balance between grade-level curriculum and the achievement level of students. Remembering that access to grade-level curriculum can be achieved through the design and development of the IEP will help with this balance. When we plan for a student’s IEP, we are focusing on access to the general education curriculum, LRE and educational benefit. To address access to grade-level content we select grade-level standards to base the goals on. If there are additional skills that need to be addressed, prerequisite skills are identified by scaffolding down to the grade level and standard that will address the prerequisite skill needed. Meredith Cathcart We are always trying to balance between grade-level curriculum and the achievement level of students. Remembering that access to grade-level curriculum can be achieved through the design and development of the IEP will help with this balance. When we plan for a student’s IEP, we are focusing on access to the general education curriculum, LRE and educational benefit. To address access to grade-level content we select grade-level standards to base the goals on. If there are additional skills that need to be addressed, prerequisite skills are identified by scaffolding down to the grade level and standard that will address the prerequisite skill needed.

49. 49 Components of IEP Compliant Goals A well-written goal answers six questions: who, does what, when, given what, how much (criteria/mastery), and how will it be measured Meredith Cathcart Slide 49 IEP goals are formatted to address certain components Who – relates to the individual student Does what – Describes the observable behavior that the student will do to complete the goal or objective/benchmark. When – relates to a specific point in time when something will have been learned or completed. Given what – Describes the conditions that will need to be in place for the goal or objective/benchmark to be completed. How much – a. Mastery – describes the performance accuracy of the behavior needed for the goal and objective/benchmark to be considered completed. Criteria – describes how many time the behavior must be observed for the goal or objective/benchmark to be considered completed. How measured – describes the performance data. Goals indicate what the student will accomplish with the program, supports and services provided in the IEP at the end of one year. Meredith Cathcart Slide 49 IEP goals are formatted to address certain components Who – relates to the individual student Does what – Describes the observable behavior that the student will do to complete the goal or objective/benchmark. When – relates to a specific point in time when something will have been learned or completed. Given what – Describes the conditions that will need to be in place for the goal or objective/benchmark to be completed. How much – a. Mastery – describes the performance accuracy of the behavior needed for the goal and objective/benchmark to be considered completed. Criteria – describes how many time the behavior must be observed for the goal or objective/benchmark to be considered completed. How measured – describes the performance data. Goals indicate what the student will accomplish with the program, supports and services provided in the IEP at the end of one year.

50. 50 Selected Standard Sixth Grade Student Grade 6 Content Standard: Reading - Literary Response and Analysis: Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature… 6.3.2 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict. Meredith Cathcart This is a sample of a grade-level, standard selected from the CMA Blueprint to use to develop goal for a 6th grade student taking the CMA. Greg is a 6th grade student who needs supports, accommodations and services to assist him in reading comprehension. Some of his reading skills are 2 years below grade level. He needs the support of a special education specialist to individualize and provide strategies in reading to give him access to the general education curriculum. Accommodations include, extra time, graphic organizers, pre-teaching and books on tape. The selected standard is 6.3.2 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict. Meredith Cathcart This is a sample of a grade-level, standard selected from the CMA Blueprint to use to develop goal for a 6th grade student taking the CMA. Greg is a 6th grade student who needs supports, accommodations and services to assist him in reading comprehension. Some of his reading skills are 2 years below grade level. He needs the support of a special education specialist to individualize and provide strategies in reading to give him access to the general education curriculum. Accommodations include, extra time, graphic organizers, pre-teaching and books on tape. The selected standard is 6.3.2 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict.

51. 51 Sample Goal 6.3.2 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot. Goal: By March 30, 2009, when given a graphic organizer Greg will analyze the qualities of the characters presented in a story (plot), with 80% accuracy in eight out of ten trials as measured by curriculum-based measures. Meredith Cathcart Here is a grade-level, standards-based goal that is written using the goal writing components and providing access to content through use of a graphic organizer accommodation. The standard is unpacked, addressing only the effect of the character on the plot. READ THE GOALMeredith Cathcart Here is a grade-level, standards-based goal that is written using the goal writing components and providing access to content through use of a graphic organizer accommodation. The standard is unpacked, addressing only the effect of the character on the plot. READ THE GOAL

52. 52 Selected Standard for Prerequisite Skill Sixth Grade Student Grade 4 Content Standard: Reading - Reading Comprehension: Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They draw upon a variety of comprehension strategies as needed. 4.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: identify structural patterns found in informational text (e.g., compare and contrast) Meredith Cathcart To support his comprehension skills, a prerequisite skill goal in comprehension a fourth grade standard is selected. using the CMA 4th grade blueprints. 4.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: identify structural patterns found in informational text (e.g., compare and contrast)Meredith Cathcart To support his comprehension skills, a prerequisite skill goal in comprehension a fourth grade standard is selected. using the CMA 4th grade blueprints. 4.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: identify structural patterns found in informational text (e.g., compare and contrast)

53. 53 Sample Prerequisite Skill Goal 4.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: identify structural patterns found in informational text (e.g., compare and contrast) Goal: By May 15, 2008 when given an informational grade-level text, which is read to him, Greg will use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast two events, with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 consecutive trials as measured by student work samples and teacher observation. Meredith Cathcart Prerequisite Skill Goal READ THE GOAL Venn diagram as a tool to organize his thoughtsMeredith Cathcart Prerequisite Skill Goal READ THE GOAL Venn diagram as a tool to organize his thoughts

54. 54 What Content Areas to Address Traditionally ELA, Math and prerequisite skills are addressed in goals Other content areas are usually addressed by related goals, supports and related services. For example, science, might be addressed by having a goal for vocabulary development that can support the student learning science vocabulary. Meredith Cathcart When we think of goal areas, we typically think of reading, writing, math, motor, social skills, speech and so on…. The laws around CMA have added the phrase grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed. So now we have to consider how to address a goal in science for 5th and 8th graders.Meredith Cathcart When we think of goal areas, we typically think of reading, writing, math, motor, social skills, speech and so on…. The laws around CMA have added the phrase grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed. So now we have to consider how to address a goal in science for 5th and 8th graders.

55. 55 Selected standard to support science Grade 5 Content Standard: Reading Comprehension (Focus on Informational Materials): Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. 5.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: understand how text features (e.g., format, graphics, sequence, diagrams, illustrations, charts, maps) make information accessible and usable. Meredith Cathcart Selected ELA standard to support science content using informational materials. Maria is a fifth grade student, who struggles with reading comprehension. Because of her difficulty with reading comprehension Maria needs support in science in order to access the science curriculum. So she will take the CMA Science assessment.Meredith Cathcart Selected ELA standard to support science content using informational materials. Maria is a fifth grade student, who struggles with reading comprehension. Because of her difficulty with reading comprehension Maria needs support in science in order to access the science curriculum. So she will take the CMA Science assessment.

56. 56 Grade 5 English-Language Arts Standard that Supports Science Content 5.2.1: Structural Features of Informational Materials: understand how text features (e.g., format, graphics, sequence, diagrams, illustrations, charts, maps) make information accessible and usable. Goal: By May 15, 2008, when given grade-level appropriate materials for Science, Maria will use illustrations and diagrams to identify five key concepts, with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher made test. Meredith Cathcart Grade-level, standards-based goal to support science content. Maria will learn to use illustrations and diagrams to learn science content. READ THE GOAL Note: We have been asked about Intervention programs for reading and English learners. These State adopted programs are considered Core Curriculum. Students taking the CMA who are in these programs need to have grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed. Matching a grade-level ELA standard to the intervention curriculum, by unpacking the standard an area to be addressed in the goal can be selected.Meredith Cathcart Grade-level, standards-based goal to support science content. Maria will learn to use illustrations and diagrams to learn science content. READ THE GOAL Note: We have been asked about Intervention programs for reading and English learners. These State adopted programs are considered Core Curriculum. Students taking the CMA who are in these programs need to have grade-level, standards-based goals for the subjects assessed. Matching a grade-level ELA standard to the intervention curriculum, by unpacking the standard an area to be addressed in the goal can be selected.

57. 57 In Closing… Ensure access to the general education curriculum Choose the most appropriate assessment Follow the participation criteria Provide accommodations and/or modifications Develop grade-level, standards-based goals for subjects assessed by the CMA Meredith Cathcart In closing, these are the main concepts that we hope you go away with today. It is critical that we ensure access to the general education curriculum for all students with disabilities. It is their civil right. IEP teams need to carefully determine the most appropriate assessment in the STAR Program for each individual student. IEP teams must follow the State Board adopted participation criteria when determining the assessment. Careful considerations should be given to how the student will access the assessment by identifying appropriate accommodations and/or modifications. IEP Teams must develop grade-level, standards-based goals for subjects being assessed by the CMA. This is may be considered for all IEPs as this will provide access to the general curriculum and allow students with disabilities to progress through the content standards.Meredith Cathcart In closing, these are the main concepts that we hope you go away with today. It is critical that we ensure access to the general education curriculum for all students with disabilities. It is their civil right. IEP teams need to carefully determine the most appropriate assessment in the STAR Program for each individual student. IEP teams must follow the State Board adopted participation criteria when determining the assessment. Careful considerations should be given to how the student will access the assessment by identifying appropriate accommodations and/or modifications. IEP Teams must develop grade-level, standards-based goals for subjects being assessed by the CMA. This is may be considered for all IEPs as this will provide access to the general curriculum and allow students with disabilities to progress through the content standards.

58. 58 Live Training October 23 – San Joaquin County Office of Education, 9-1 October 30 – Anaheim City School District, 9-1 Meredith Cathcart There are two live training sessions, which have filled up very quickly. What we want to highlight is how they will differ from the Webinar. If you are planning on attending one of the training sessions. These 2 trainings will be different from the webinar in the following ways: 4 hour block of time Updated information A more in-depth look at access, statewide assessment, accommodations and goal writing Time for questions and answersMeredith Cathcart There are two live training sessions, which have filled up very quickly. What we want to highlight is how they will differ from the Webinar. If you are planning on attending one of the training sessions. These 2 trainings will be different from the webinar in the following ways: 4 hour block of time Updated information A more in-depth look at access, statewide assessment, accommodations and goal writing Time for questions and answers

59. 59 What will you need to do to address these requirement in your IEPs? What things will need to be in place during the testing window to accommodate students’ needs? If you have an online IEP system, will you need to consider modifications to the goal section of your program in order to write grade-level, standards-based goals for students taking the CMA? How will you increase access to the general education curriculum for you students with disabilities? Jill Larson As we mentioned in the beginning, here are some questions for your sites to consider as follow-up to the Webinar. Please take time now to post questions you have. If you don’t get time to post, or you have questions later please email Jill or Meredith.Jill Larson As we mentioned in the beginning, here are some questions for your sites to consider as follow-up to the Webinar. Please take time now to post questions you have. If you don’t get time to post, or you have questions later please email Jill or Meredith.

60. 60 Contact us Trainers Meredith Cathcart [email protected] Jill Larson [email protected] Meredith Cathcart Please feel free to contact Jill or me if you have additional questions.Meredith Cathcart Please feel free to contact Jill or me if you have additional questions.

61. 61 Thank You For more information visit the CMA website: http://www.cacompcenter.org/cma Meredith Cathcart Thank you so much for joining us today. We hope you found this presentation informative. We look forward to seeing some of you in Stockton or Anaheim. Jill Larson This presentation will be archived at this Web site. It will include the PowerPoint, the resources, the updated FAQ,s and the audio version. Thank you for sharing time with us.Meredith Cathcart Thank you so much for joining us today. We hope you found this presentation informative. We look forward to seeing some of you in Stockton or Anaheim. Jill Larson This presentation will be archived at this Web site. It will include the PowerPoint, the resources, the updated FAQ,s and the audio version. Thank you for sharing time with us.

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