Public buildings
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Public Buildings. SCHOOLS. The first colonial schools were one roomed, one building structures. Schools progressively got larger due to growth in the population. Interior of school during the 1600s. Only one roomed and simply boxlike. .

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Public Buildings

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Public buildings

Public Buildings


Schools

SCHOOLS

  • The first colonial schools were one roomed, one building structures.

  • Schools progressively got larger due to growth in the population

Interior of school during the 1600s. Only one roomed and simply boxlike.

Colonial Harvard college (founded in 1636). Huge school building with several floors and windows.


Churches

CHURCHES

  • Earliest churches had a barn like appearance.

  • Stain glass windows were present in the front and sides of the church.

  • Large bell towers could be found in the front center.

  • These churches were made of a brick foundation;

Colonial Church in Williamsburg. One storied building with triangular roof. Contains a distinctive bell tower.


Courthouses

COURTHOUSES

  • Court houses were geometric buildings made of brick

  • They had double doors in the front leading directly to the courtroom

  • Two glass windows were in the back of the building behind the alter

This is a colonial courthouse located in Williamsburg. One storied building that has a geometric scheme.


Public hospital

PUBLIC HOSPITAL

  • Two story buildings used for treating mental and physical illness.

  • Constructed of brick with a small tower through the center.


Colonial architecture 1607 1700

Colonial Architecture: 1607-1700

  • The houses for the period of this time were heavily revolved around building traditions in Europe.


Materials features

Materials / Features

  • They constructed wood-frame homes covered with weatherboard, clapboard, or shingles.

  • This was a result of the use of local timber, which shows they used the resources around them.

  • The materials were also easy to find, instead of having to buy them.

  • Colonists expanded their living space with adding on sloping saltbox roof to their houses, named after the shape of boxes used to store salt.

  • They were usually two stories tall with a steep pitched roof with side gables.

  • Central chimneys were also common, being the most efficient way to heat these buildings during winters.

  • There were small casement windows, and some even with diamond-shaped panes.


Cape cod colonial

Cape Cod Colonial

  • The Pilgrims designed Colonial Cape Cod houses so that they provided safety from New England’s extreme winter climate.

  • The Pilgrims designed Colonial Cape Cod houses so that they provided safety from New England’s extreme winter climate.

  • The Pilgrims built central chimneys and low ceilinged rooms to conserve heat to battle against the cold.

  • Usually a 1 1 ⁄ 2 -story compact house that is small and symmetrical

  • It has one central entrance.

  • The roof is the steep gable type covered with shingles.

  • The authentic types have low central chimneys.

  • Bedrooms are on the first floor.

  • The attic may be finished into additional bedrooms and a bath.

  • A vine-covered picket fence is traditional.

  • Most homes faced the south, which allowed sunlight to enter the windows and provide additional heat because it was very cold.

  • The steep roof characteristic of New England homes also prevented excessive amounts of snow from piling up on the house.


Dutch colonial

Dutch Colonial

  • Dutch Colonial developed from around 1630 with the arrival of Dutch colonists.

  • The settlers built small, one room cottages with stone walls and steep roofs to allow a second floor loft.

  • By 1670 or so, two-story gable-end homes were common in New Amsterdam.

  • The Dutch Colonial house plan is very simple in nature and is suitable for families.

  • Most popular in New York and New England. They usually have the same one or one-and-a-half-story form as the Cape Cod.

  • The defining characteristic of a Dutch Colonial home is the flared eaves and/or gambrel roof form (think of a barn roof).

  • Bedrooms are often found on the upper floor under the roof, with dormers or windows at the ends to allow light to penetrate.

  • Later examples of the Dutch style home may have a full second story.

  • The house features a symmetrical plan that flanks a central door, often leading to a central hallway with flanking rooms.

  • Usually one to 1 ½ stories, with windows for light and ventilation.

  • Often constructed of stone, with a combination of brick and clapboard siding.

  • Central door and balanced windows.


Colonial architecture 1700 1770

Colonial Architecture: 1700-1770

- Colonial homes of the English, Spanish, Dutch, Georgian, French, and Federal style homes were very different.

- Houses had no electricity, running water, or heat.

- Fire and wells were used instead


Dutch colonial homes

Dutch Colonial Homes

  • Frame of the houses were made of timber

  • Exterior walls were made out of stones held together by a plaster compound.

  • Originally were one room cottages that would allow them to have a loft


Spanish colonial homes

Spanish Colonial Homes

  • Spanish colonial homes were not unlike fortresses in the area, with thick adobe walls, and windows had heavy, iron grills

  • Houses derived from small cottages in Spanish Florida that were called “board house”.


French colonial homes

French Colonial Homes

  • French colonial above-ground basement had walls made of a plaster based material that included animal hair, Spanish moss, sand, and mud.

  • Mainly used thick timber a frame of houses

  • Houses had steep rooves to avoid collapse, a design still used today.


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