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What caused World War II? What happened during the Holocaust? . World War II was caused by the growing tide of fascism in Europe and imperialism in Japan. The United States entered the war when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.

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What caused world war ii what happened during the holocaust
What caused World War II? What happened during the Holocaust?

  • World War II was caused by the growing tide of fascism in Europe and imperialism in Japan. The United States entered the war when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.

  • Adolf Hitler and the Nazis sent six million European Jews to their deaths in organized killings known as the Holocaust. Families were separated and destroyed.


the story of Anne Frank and the children of La Holocaust? Hille are just two examples of the many stories that come from families.

  • Are you familiar with stories from your own families? The story could be from a war, an immigration experience, or an event unique to your family. You must interview a family member or friend about a story that has affected their lives. Develop a scrapbook page of the event using segments of the interview, photographs, and souvenirs.

  • You will have time in class to prepare interview questions. If you need help getting started, consider the following questions:

    • When did this event take place?

    • Where did it take place?

    • What makes this event significant?

    • Was the individual involved in danger? If so, how did he or she escape?

    • Does this event continue to affect your family or friends? If so, how?


The butterfly
“The Butterfly” Holocaust?

The last, the very last,So richly, brightly, dazzlingly yellow.Perhaps if the sun’s tears would sing against a white stone....

For seven weeks I’ve lived in here,Penned up inside this ghetto.But I have found what I love here.The dandelions call to meAnd the white chestnut branches in the court.Only I never saw another butterfly.

Such, such a yellowIs carried lightly ’way up high.It went away I’m sure because it wished to kiss the world good-bye.

That butterfly was the last one.Butterflies don’t live in here, in the ghetto.

Pavel Friedman, June 4, 1942

Born in Prague on Jan. 7, 1921.Deported to the Terezin Concentration Camp on April 26, 1942. Died in Aushchwitz on Sept. 29, 1944


Questions to discuss
Questions to discuss: Holocaust?

1.Who do you think wrote this poem?

2.What experiences do you think generated this poem?

3.To what is the poem referring?

4.How does this poem make you feel?


About the holocaust
About the Holocaust… Holocaust?

More than 12,000 children under the age of 15 passed through the Terezin Concentration Camp between the years 1942-1944. More than 90 percent perished during the Holocaust. In these poems and pictures drawn by the young inmates of Terezin, we see the daily misery of these uprooted children, as well as their courage and optimism, their hopes and fears.


The butterfly project
The Butterfly Project Holocaust?

After several silent readings, see if they can find any examples of hopes, dreams and/or fears in your child’s poem.After you have read the poems and feel comfortable with it, discuss your poem with another classmate. You should begin to feel comfortable with your poem and be able to relate to the author and the words the author wrote. Prepare an oral interpretative reading of their poems.


Instructions
Instructions: Holocaust?

  • Create a butterfly that is a representative of the author of your own poem. You should write the name of your child on the butterfly if the child’s name is available.

  • You should be prepared to discuss why you chose the enhancements of each of your own butterflies. It is important to be creative make whatever butterfly you feel comfortable making.

  • Then with string, hang your butterfly from the ceiling. (You may use a hole punch to make a place to attach the string to the butterfly.) Every butterfly (soul of the author of their poem) should be displayed.

  • By the end of the class period, you will have many bright and beautiful  butterflies hanging from the ceiling, each representing a child of Theresienstadt.


Examples
Examples: Holocaust?

http://www.hmh.org/ed_butterfly11.shtml


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