Skills development in the study of a world religion
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Skills development in the study of a world religion. Judaism exemplar. Interpreting texts Micah 4:1 – 5 Jewish beliefs: Messiah . Micah 4:1 – 5 (Jewish beliefs: Messiah) .

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Skills development in the study of a world religion

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Judaism exemplar

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

  • Practitioners should always refer to the relevant SQA documentation when creating materials so as to include material for all relevant skills and knowledge.

  • These activities are similar in style and purpose to those in the Christianity exemplar but these are based around Jewish themes and texts, showing how the activities can be adapted to the study of any world religion.

  • The first two example activities are designed to provide practitioners with ideas for developing and reinforcing knowledge and understanding of some of the themes of this text and also to consider other relevant texts. The other examples provide ideas to develop higher-order skills.

  • This exemplar should be read in conjunction with section 1 – Introductory Advice and Guidance.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah1

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

  • The book of Micah is the sixth book in the collection known as the Twelve Minor Prophets. It is set in the 8th century BCE, a time of invasion and slavery of the people of Israel and Judah. The book is attributed to Micah of Moresheth (in the hills of Judah). Micah means ‘Who is like Yahweh’.


Skills development in the study of a world religion1

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

We are pleased to announce

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah2

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

We are pleased to announce

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • remembering

  • understanding

  • applying.


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Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

We are pleased to announce

Instructions

  • Learners are put into groups of about four and issued with a card containing pieces of scripture connected with the Messiah story.

  • The groups are told to quickly discuss the card. They must try to formulate an explanation of the text using their own words. When they have an answer, one member of the group stands and says loudly ‘We are pleased to announce…’ and gives the group response to the class. They can then be questioned by the practitioner or other learners to check understanding.

  • The group are given a new card and the activity continues until each group has given at least one announcement.


Skills development in the study of a world religion2

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Perfect answer

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah4

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

The LORD says, ‘A day is coming when I will restore the kingdom of David, which is like a house fallen into ruins. I will repair its walls and restore it. I will rebuild it and make it as it was long ago. ’

Amos 9: 11

He will settle disputes among the nations, among the great powers near and far. They will hammer their swords into ploughs and their spears into pruning knives.

Nations will never again go to war, never prepare for battle again.

Everyone will live in peace among their own vineyards and fig trees, and no one will make them afraid.

The LORD Almighty has promised this.

Micah 4: 3–4

Many nations will come streaming to it, and their people will say, ‘Let us go up the hill of the LORD, to the Temple of Israel's God.

He will teach us what he wants us to do;

we will walk in the paths he has chosen.

For the LORD'S teaching comes from Jerusalem.

Micah 4:2

  • The consequences of the coming of the Messiah include:

  • peace will reign on earth

  • He will lead the Jewish people back to the land of Israel

But the time will come when the people of Israel will once again turn to the Lord their God and to a descendant of David their king. Then they will fear the Lord and will receive his good gifts.

Hosea 3: 5

A day is coming when the new king from the royal line of David will be a symbol to the nations. They will gather in his royal city and give him honour.

Isaiah 11: 10


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah5

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Perfect answer

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • remembering

  • understanding

  • applying.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah6

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Perfect answer

Instructions

  • Learners work in groups.

  • Numbered questions are placed around the room.

  • Each member of the group is given a number.

  • In numerical order, learners take it in turns to go and find a question (these must be answered in numerical order: learner 1 finds question 1 then 2 finds 2 and so on).

  • Once the learner has found the question they return to the group and tell everyone what it is.

  • The group develop as detailed an answer as possible.

  • The learner who found the question takes the ‘perfect’ answer to the practitioner.

  • The practitioner can accept the answer, ask for an expansion or give a ‘clue’ to take back to the group to discuss and find the ‘perfect’ answer.

  • The process is then repeated until the group has provided the ‘perfect’ answer. Then the next learner goes and finds the next question and the process begins again.


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Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Question 1

The Jewish people will return to what land?

Question 3

What will the Messiah bring?

Question 2

Why have the Jewish people left the land of Israel?


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah8

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Question 4

What will the Messiah be?

Question 5

Do the Jewish people believe the Messiah has come?


Skills development in the study of a world religion3

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Critical interpretation

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah9

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Critical interpretation

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • understanding

  • applying.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah10

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Critical interpretation

Instructions

  • Learners are presented with a text from the Hebrew Bible for investigation.

  • They are given a few minutes to read over the passage and write a couple of comments about what they think the passage is about.

  • The class discuss the various interpretations and are given time to add to the ones they have already written.

  • This process continues until all the passages for discussion have been covered.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah11

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah12

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah13

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Skills development in the study of a world religion4

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Building the background

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah14

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Building the background

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • understanding

  • applying

  • analysing.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah15

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Thinking about the nature of the text you are reading is an important first stage in good analysis and evaluation. There are various views about the genres of the Hebrew Bible. The different views about this can be categorised into two main groups.

  • The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi as literal. It is believed to be historical.

  • The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi poetically. It is believed to be symbolic.

    Learners should be encouraged to recognise that there are different views that exist within many religions about the nature of the Hebrew Bible and that these views affect Jewish beliefs.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah16

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Building the background – Part A

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • understanding

  • applying.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah17

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Building the background – Part A

Instructions

View 1: The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi and understood as a literal, historical account of the hope for the future and the developing relationship between God and His people.

Argument 1: The story forms one of the clearest pieces of scripture that states the hope of the future with the coming Messiah. This belief will be developed in other parts of scripture to include the Covenant.

  • These prophecies are thought to describe the unique hope given by the prophet Micah to the people in the 8th century BCE.

  • Some people argue that if you doubt that this prophecy and the unique message given to this prophet are true then you must doubt the rest of scripture as all is inspired by God.

    Learners could find out about three other minor prophets recorded in this section of the Hebrew Bible. They could write down at least two ‘facts’ about them, explaining why some people say that this shows that the Hebrew Bible is a historical book.


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Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah19

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah20

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah21

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Building the background – Part B

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • understanding

  • applying

  • analysing.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah22

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Building the background – Part B

Instructions

View 1: The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi and understood as a literal, historical account of the hope for the future and the developing relationship.

Argument 2: The story is referred to by other prophets.

  • The fact that other prophets have used similar (if not the same) words shows that this is an important message sent by God.

  • The fact that other prophets have used similar (if not the same) themes shows that this is an important message sent by God.

    Learners should read the following sources carefully. Using what they have read, they can write a short argument about why some Jews believe that the Hebrew Bible must be historical. Reference to, and discussion of, the sources are important:


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah23

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Skills development in the study of a world religion5

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Considering interpretation

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah24

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Considering interpretation – Part A

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • understanding

  • applying

  • analysing.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah25

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Considering interpretation – Part A

View 2: The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi poetically. It is believed to be symbolic.

Argument 1: Micah is structured like a poem.

Read the famous poem below and compare it to Micah Chapter 4.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah26

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah27

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Discussion questions and activities for pairs or small groups:

There are some aspects of this poem that make it obvious to us that it is a poem. What are they?

Read Micah Chapter 4 carefully and try to identify aspects of it that are similar to Owen’s poem.

Write your viewpoints on a piece of paper with your name.

Find a partner and tell them your viewpoint, remembering to give at least one reason for it.

Swap your pieces of paper and talk to another person. This time your viewpoint is the one on the piece of paper.

Repeat the exchanges until told to stop.

At the end of the activity you will be asked to explain the viewpoint on the piece of paper you are holding and the reasons behind it.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah28

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Considering interpretation – Part B

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • applying

  • analysing

  • evaluating.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah29

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Considering interpretation – Part B

View 2: The Hebrew Bible is read by a rabbi poetically. It is believed to be symbolic.

Argument 2: The Book of Micah is full of symbolic images that should not be understood literally. Some people say these make it clear to us that the prophets, and subsequently all the Hebrew Bible, should not be thought of as a historical piece of writing.

Read Micah Chapter 4 again very carefully and try to identify any unusual things that many people say make it clear that it shouldn’t be understood literally.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah30

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Considering interpretation – Part B

Think, pair, share

Individual learners make a list of unusual things in Micah Chapter 4.

They discuss these with a partner, making sure to add more to their list if the partner has identified anything different.

The pairs now share the new list with a small group and again add to the list if the others have identified anything different.

Learners now discuss in these groups why some people say it is clear that the Hebrew Bible should not be understood literally.

The group could work together to produce a short explanation on a show-me board and hold it up for peers and the practitioner to see.


Skills development in the study of a world religion6

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Evaluation trading

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah31

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Evaluation trading

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • applying

  • analysing

  • evaluating.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah32

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish Beliefs: Messiah)

Evaluation trading

Instructions

  • In small groups learners discuss possible evaluative responses to questions relating to the text being studied, e.g. what does belief in the Messiah offer the Jewish Community today?

  • The group challenge is to find as many viewpoints in connection with the particular evaluative question they are considering.

  • Once the group has agreed at least one suitable answer they should write their responses onto show-me boards.

  • Once the practitioner is satisfied that each group has a suitable evaluative response, which can be explained if asked, then a selected member of the group should try to trade their response with another group.

  • This process should be repeated until the group has collated many different viewpoints of the Jewish belief.

  • The practitioner and/or learners should now question groups as to what their responses mean, which they feel are the strongest and why they feel that.


Skills development in the study of a world religion

Evaluation trading: possible example answers

The promise of the Messiah is an important figure to the Prophets, especially Micah, due to the circumstances that they were living in, slavery and oppression.

This has a profound message to the Jewish community today as they can associate with the oppression of their beliefs by almost every European power over the last two thousand years.

The Messiah brings the hope that their will be a time in which all will live in peace and harmony.

The promise of the Messiah is an important hope to the Prophets, especially Micah, due to the circumstances that they were living in, slavery and oppression.

This has a profound significance to the Jewish community today, as the promise of the Messiah is about a person, prophet, teacher and leader.

The Messiah will lead the Jewish people back to the land of Israel.

The promise of the Messianic Age is an important theme to the Prophets, especially Micah, due to the circumstances that they were living in, slavery and oppression.

This has some significance to the Jewish community today, as the promise of the Messianic Age is not about a person, rather the actions of all peoples. So, all are obliged to work towards bringing about a world of harmony.

The Messianic Age gives an example of a way in which all should act.


Skills development in the study of a world religion7

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Priority Pyramid

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah33

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Priority Pyramid

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • applying

  • analysing

  • evaluating


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah34

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Priority Pyramid

  • This activity allows learners to consider what points may be most relevant when considering a key question. It asks learners to prioritise ideas and information on the question, and discuss justifications for their choices.

  • Learners are given a set of cards with words, phrases or pictures which relate to a key question. (There should be enough cards to allow learners to build a pyramid.) Alternatively, learners could write down their own ideas on a piece of paper or post-it notes and use them to build their pyramid.

  • Learners work through the cards (or their own post-it notes), deciding as a group how relevant or important each one is to the key question. The most important factors form the top section of the pyramid, the least important factors go at the bottom.

  • Groups then give feedback on their decisions, justifying their choices.


Skills development in the study of a world religion

According to the Hebrew Bible, the Jewish people believe they have a special relationship with G-d, they are a chosen people.

As part of this special relationship, G-d has made promises that a Messiah will be sent.

But, just how important is the Messiah to the Jewish Community today? What does the Messiah mean for the Jewish Community today?

King

Covenant

Example

Warrior

Great

leader

Doesn’t matter today

Will return the people to their land

Too late

Bringer of peace

Teacher and judge

Descendant of David

Place the cards in the order you think is most important for Jews and be prepared to explain your decisions.

for all


Skills development in the study of a world religion8

Judaism exemplar

Skills development in the study of a world religion

Activity:

Evaluation placemat

Interpreting texts

Micah 4:1–5

Jewish beliefs: Messiah


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah35

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Evaluation placemat

Key skills developed in this activity:

  • analysing

  • evaluating

  • creating.


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah36

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish beliefs: Messiah)

Evaluation placemat

  • This activity is designed to encourage a collaborative development of evaluative responses to a particular question.

  • In groups of four each learner must write their own evaluative responses to the question in the space provided.

  • The group should then discuss each contribution and decide on the best ones to be included in the centre of the placemat.

  • Examples of possible evaluative questions are:

    • What are the advantages of the belief in a Messiah?

    • What are the difficulties with belief in the account given by the Prophet Micah?

    • How does a literal understanding of the prophets help or hinder the life of a believer facing contemporary life/issues?


Micah 4 1 5 jewish beliefs messiah37

Micah 4:1–5(Jewish Beliefs: Messiah)

Messiah will be a descendent of David.

This is important for the idea of fulfilment according to the many promises made in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Amos 9:11)

Messiah is the hope for the whole world

This hope that has been revealed to the Jewish people is not just for them. The Messiah will come and all will be drawn to the glory that God has created. This is the hope for all humanity (for he will come when things have got so bad that God has to intervene again). (Is 11:10)

Messiah is the hope for peace

God has promised one will come to teach and to judge, one who will bring peace and none will fear and this is because God has promised this and God is to be believed because He is God! (Mic 4:2–4)

Why have a belief in a Messiah?

Messiah will lead the Jewish people back to Israel

This is important for the idea of Covenant. The Jewish people have a Covenant with God and He will send a great leader who will bring them back to their land. God has made this promise and so it must be fulfilled. (Hos 3:5)


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