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THE AGE OF IMPERILAISM. THE WORLD AND THE UNITED STATES. WORLD HISTORY GEE UNIT. AMERICAN AND WORLD IMPERIALISM 1867-1914. IMPERIALISM.

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THE AGE OF IMPERILAISM

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The age of imperilaism

THE AGE OF IMPERILAISM

THE WORLD AND THE UNITED STATES


World history gee unit

WORLD HISTORY GEE UNIT

  • AMERICAN AND WORLD IMPERIALISM

  • 1867-1914


Imperialism

IMPERIALISM

  • Imperialism- when a country extends their power and influence over other countries; may acquire new territories or just exert their influence over another country

  • THE WORLD STARTED AN IMPERIALISM RACE. GREAT BRITAIN HAD COLONIES ON EVERY CONTINENT. THEY BOASTED THE SUN NEVER SETS ON THE BRITISH EMPIRE.

  • A COLONIAL RACE STARTED WITH NATIONS AGRESSIVELY TAKING OVER COLONIES.

  • GAMES THAT ILLUSTRATE IMPERIALISM—CHESS, CHECKERS, MONOPOLY

  • WORDS TO DESCRIBE IMPERIALISM: CONQUER, ATTACK, RULE, CLAIM, HARSH, CHANGE


What is imperialism

WHAT IS IMPERIALISM?

  • IMPERIALISM IS…………

  • A.It is the quest for colonial empires.

  • B. It is when a country extends their power

  • and/or authority over other lands or

  • territories.

  • It is the practice of establishing and controlling colonies.


Why do countries become imperialistic

Why do countries become imperialistic?

  • A. For Economic Purposes

  • --To gain control over lands that were not colonized.

  • -- Factories needed more supplies due to the Industrial

  • Revolution which in turn made countries need more raw

  • materials/natural resources.

  • -- To expand trade and their economy.

  • B. For Military Reasons

  • --New inventions, such as the repeating rifles and machine guns, made

  • warfare and conquering lands easier.

  • - Countries would take over lands for naval/military bases

  • -- Countries would take over lands to create refueling stations.


Why do countries become imperialistic1

Why do countries become imperialistic?

  • C. For Humanitarian Purposes

    --Many individuals felt that it was their moral duty to spread Christianity.

  • D. For Nationalistic reasons

    --Nationalism is a devotion to one’s nation.

    --To gain control over lands that were not colonized.

    --To expand the economy of a nation.


2 stages of imperialism

2 stages of imperialism

  • Old v. New Imperialism: The 2 Phases of Imperialism

  • A. Old Imperialism occurred during the 1400’s and 1500’s. Great Britain, France, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal were all racing to become colonial powers.

  • B. New Imperialism occurred during the 1800’s—primarily the late 1800’s. Belgium, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia and the United States joined the original imperialist.


The united states and the far east

THE UNITED STATES AND THE FAR EAST

  • Since 1895 Japan and the European powers had been forcing China to surrender leased territories and had been establishing large additional spheres of economic influence.

  • In 1899 Secretary of State John Hay stated traditional American policy in a fresh manner.

  • Partly at the prompting of American commercial interests, he addressed identical notes to the six leading powers, asking them to affirm equal treatment for foreign commerce within their spheres of interest in China.

  • Though the answers were ambiguous, Hay announced that the world had accepted this Open Door Policy.


Imperialism in china

IMPERIALISM IN CHINA

  • China- Americans went to China in the 1800s as missionaries to spread Christianity. These missionaries believed that is was their moral duty to help Christianize the Chinese people. Many Chinese resented these foreigners telling them that their religion was false and so a secret society formed, called “Righteous Harmony Fists” or “Boxers”, and they murdered over 200 missionaries in China. This event was called the Boxer Rebellion.

  • China- For years, China had been closed off to trade with the rest of the world. Then, in the mid-late 1800s, China


China and imperialism

CHINA AND IMPERIALISM

  • opened it doors to trade with foreign countries. Germany, France, Great Britain, and Russia eagerly proposed a trading policy called the “spheres of influence”. This policy allowed only these countries to trade in China. Each country was given a “sphere” or section of China where they could conduct trade. The US did not agree to this policy because we were not included. As a result, a US official (John Hay) came up with the “Open Door Policy” which said that all countries could trade in China wherever they wanted to. The other countries did not object so Hay and the Americans assumed that the other countries must have agreed to the new policy.


France great britain germany japan and russis carve out spheres of influence in china

FRANCE, GREAT BRITAIN, GERMANY, JAPAN AND RUSSIS CARVE OUT SPHERES OF INFLUENCE IN CHINA.

  • SECTIONS OF A MARKET CARVED OUT AND CLAIMED BY A SPECIFIC COUNTRY.


The united states and the far east 39

THE UNITED STATES AND THE FAR EAST 39

  • In 1900 when the anti-foreign Boxer Rebellion endangered the lives of foreigners in Peking, the United States joined an international rescue expedition.

  • At this time Hay broadened the Open Door Policy by sending a second note affirming American support of Chinese territorial integrity and calling for commercial equality in all parts of the Chinese empire, not just the spheres of influence.


Boxer rebellion

Boxer Rebellion


The united states and the far east 391

THE UNITED STATES AND THE FAR EAST 39

  • Foreign relations inevitably brought the United States closer to Great Britain.

  • During the war with Spain, when most European countries had opposed the United States, Great Britain had given support.

  • Like the United States, Great Britain had wanted the status quo maintained in the Far East as well as the Caribbean and welcomed help in achieving this objective.


The united states and the far east 392

THE UNITED STATES AND THE FAR EAST 39

  • In many American circles, especially in the eastern upper class, the turn of the century saw a revival of sentiment for British friendship on cultural and even racial grounds.

  • The pro-British tendency was not shared, however, by those Americans who opposed British policies in Ireland, India, and South Africa and who still thought of England as the stronghold of monarchy and aristocracy.


Did we follow his advice

Did we follow his advice?

  • President George Washington’s Farewell Address reminded Americans that he was an isolationists and that entangling alliances would drag the new nation into unnecessary wars. Isolationism is when countries avoid

  • political entanglements in other nation’s affairs, as well as, alliances.


End of isolation

End of isolation

  • The Monroe Doctrine was established in 1823 by President James Monroe. He said that European nations needed to stay in their hemisphere. He stressed that Europe need not try to come and colonize in the Americas. He agreed to stay out of their hemisphere if they would stay out of the Americas. This made the United States the protector of the Americas and set the stage for the United States to become the international police. 20 years later, James K. Polk embraced Monroe’s views and made them the cornerstone of his foreign policy. James K. Polk was very involved in the Age of Manifest Destiny.


Imperialism within usa

Imperialism within USA

  • The Age of Manifest Destiny occurred between 1830-1860. Manifest

  • Destiny is a belief that the United States should expand past the original 13

  • colonies. This belief stated that the United States should expand from “sea to

  • shining sea.” This philosophy created tension because the constitution did

  • not grant the United States president the direct power of expansion. This

  • philosophy would eventually grow from expansion within the United States

  • to overseas. The United States went through a period of economic and

  • territorial expansion. During this period the following territories were added

  • to the United States: Texas, Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Arizona.

  • The United States tried to purchase Cuba from Spain but was unsuccessful.

  • This gradual progression of new territories made expansionism explode. This

  • encouraged Americans to deviate away from isolationism.


The age of imperilaism

The United States’ policy of acting as an international police force in the Western

Hemisphere can be traced back to the early 1900s and the —

A Marshall Plan.

B Roosevelt Corollary.

C Open Door Notes.

D Dawes Plan.


The progressive ear and world war i 39

THE PROGRESSIVE EAR AND WORLD WAR I 39

  • On September 6, 1901, President William McKinley was shot by an anarchist.

  • When he died a week later, Theodore Roosevelt became President.

  • This event is often taken to be the beginning of a new period of progressive reform which lasted until World War I.


Foreign affairs 33

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 33

  • Reasons for America’s Turn to Imperialism

  • Following the Civil War, and especially in the 1890s, the United States began to extend its control over weaker nations in the Caribbean, Central America, South America, and the Pacific.

  • One reason for this turn to imperialism involved the growth of American industry. Industrialists began to look abroad for new sources of raw materials, for additional markets for manufactured goods, and for places to invest surplus capital.


Foreign affairs 331

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 33

  • Another reason for the turn to imperialism was the closing of the frontier in 1890.

  • American manufacturers and investors had to look beyond the United States for economic opportunities.


Foreign affairs 332

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 33

  • The European powers were engaged in imperialist ventures, and this set an example for the United States.


Foreign affairs 333

FOREIGN AFFAIRS 33

  • Expansionists in America urged that the United States assume its rightful place as a great power by embarking upon a policy of imperialism.

  • Most influential were the lectures and writings of Captain Alfred Mahan. In his book The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, Mahan urged the United States to expand foreign markets, to maintain a powerful navy, and to acquire overseas bases.

  • One of his strongest supporters was Theodore Roosevelt.


First acquisitions 33

FIRST ACQUISITIONS 33

  • The United States purchased Alaska in 1867.

  • Russia proposed to sell Alaska to the United States, and Secretary of State William Seward agreed to the purchase.

  • Seward’s reasons for acceptance were gratitude to Russia for her support of the Union during the Civil War and a desire to reduce foreign possessions in North America.

  • Many people thought “Seward’s Folly” was a waste of $7.2 million.

  • Alaska received the status of an incorporated territory in 1912 as a step toward statehood.

  • In 1959 Alaska became the 49th state.


First acquisitions 331

FIRST ACQUISITIONS 33

  • The Samoan Islands in the South Pacific served American merchant ships as supply harbors and coaling stations.

  • Starting in 1872 the harbor of Pago Pago came under American control.

  • In 1899 several of the islands were formally annexed to the United States.

  • Also in the 19th century, the United States annexed the Central Pacific island of Midway.

  • Today American Midway and Samoa are American colonies and provide the United States with naval and air bases.


Samoan islands

Samoan Islands


Midway

Midway


First acquisitions 34

FIRST ACQUISITIONS 34

  • Hawaii served American merchant ships as a supply and refueling station.

  • It drew American missionaries who converted the natives to Christianity, and it attracted American investors in sugar plantations.

  • Almost all the sugar grown in Hawaii was sold to the United States.


Hawaii

Hawaii


Queen liliuokalani

Queen Liliuokalani

  • THE

  • HAWAIIAN

  • QUEEN


First acquisitions 341

FIRST ACQUISITIONS 34

  • In 1893 revolutionaries, consisting mainly of American settlers, overthrew the anti-American native Queen Liliuokalani.

  • A temporary republic was established, and United States recognition was sought.

  • President Cleveland, who believed that most native Hawaiians preferred independence, delayed annexation.

  • In 1898, however, with McKinley in the White House, the United States annexed Hawaii by a joint resolution of Congress.


The age of imperilaism

The acquisition of the Hawaiian Islands in 1898 was a result of United States —

A Imperialism.

B Progressivism.

C Socialism.

D Isolationism.


The age of imperilaism

Americans in the late 19th century who favored the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands MOST commonly supported their position by pointing out Hawaii’s —

A rich mineral resources.

B highly skilled population.

C industrial strength.

D strategic location.


The spanish american war 34

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 34

  • Americans had long been interested in the Spanish colony of Cuba.

  • They recognize Cuba’s strategic location and its importance as a key defense base.

  • Americans were afraid that someday it would pass into stronger European hands.

  • Before the Civil War, some Southerners wanted to annex Cuba as another slave state.

  • During and immediately after the Civil War, American interest in Cuba subsided.


The spanish american war 341

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 34

  • Spanish rule was despotic.

  • The Cubans were denied civil liberties.

  • They were forced to pay heavy taxes.

  • Rebellions were suppressed.

  • In 1876, after a lengthy insurrection, the Spanish promised some reforms.

  • Ten years later, Spain finally abolished slavery but still denied the Cubans self-government.

  • In 1895, as a depression hit the island, Spain faced another Cuban revolt for independence.


The spanish american war 342

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR34

  • There were several important causes of the war with Spain.

  • Humanitarianism was one.

  • Americans sympathized with the desire of the Cuban people for independence.

  • They were outraged when Spain’s General Weyler placed Cuban civilians in concentration camps to prevent them from aiding the revolution. Many died in the camps.


The spanish american war 343

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 34

  • America’s economic interest in Cuba was a factor leading to war.

  • American merchants traded with Cuba to the amount of $100 million a year.

  • American investors had placed $50 million in Cuban sugar and tobacco plantations.

  • Trade with Cuba suffered from unsettled conditions.

  • Many American investors were concerned, but others feared that war with Spain would destroy their property and lead to laws harmful to their interests.


The spanish american war 344

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 34

  • The newspapers of the period helped stir up a revolt.

  • The yellow press—especially William Randolph Hearst’s New York Journal and Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World—sought to increase circulation by sensational news from Cuba.


Joseph pulitzer william randolph hearst

JOSEPH PULITZER & WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST

  • YELLOW JOURNALIST


The spanish aamerican war 35

THE SPANISH-AAMERICAN WAR 35

  • Journalists exaggerated stories of Spanish atrocities and falsified news pictures while playing down atrocities by the Cuban revolutionaries.

  • The yellow press also gave sensational treatment to the De Lome Letter.

  • Written by the Spanish minister in Washington to a friend in Cuba and stolen from the Havana post office, this private letter belittled President McKinley as a weak, incompetent politician.


The spanish americcan war 35

THE SPANISH-AMERICCAN WAR 35

  • The immediate cause of the war was the sinking of the Maine.

  • This battleship, visiting in Havana, was blown up with a loss of 260 American lives.

  • The cause of the explosion remains unknown, but the American people placed the blame on Spain.

  • They were goaded into war by the yellow press and by the jingoists, men who boasted of the nation’s strength and wanted an overseas empire.


The spanish american war 35

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 35

  • President McKinley had sought to avert war and urged Americans to remain calm regarding Cuba.

  • With the sinking of the Maine, however, he demanded that Spain proclaim an armistice, end the concentration camps, and negotiate with the rebels.

  • Although Spain’s reply was conciliatory, McKinley finally yielded to American public sentiment for war.


The spanish american war 351

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 35

  • At his request, Congress approved the use of armed forces in Cuba.

  • Congress also recognized the independence of Cuba and, in the Teller Resolution, declared that the United States would not annex Cuba but would leave “control of the island to its people.”


The spanish american war 352

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 35

  • With “Remember the Maine!” as their battle cry, American forces swept quickly and easily to victory.

  • One of the earliest victories was that of Commodore George Dewey in Manila Bay.

  • Assistant Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt had taken advantage of his superior’s temporary absence to direct Dewey two months earlier to be thoroughly prepared for action.

  • Dewey moved into Manila Bay and without losing a single man sank the whole Spanish fleet of ten ships.


The maine

The Maine

  • REMEMBER THE MAINE


The spanish american war 353

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 35

  • In the Caribbean, American naval forces destroyed the Spanish fleet at Santiago, Cuba.

  • Meanwhile, American forces captured the city after a battle famed for the heroic dash up San Juan Hill by Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders.


The age of imperilaism

“Remember the Maine” is a memorable slogan and rallying cry in American

history. The slogan symbolizes the onset of which of the following wars?

A World War I

B Spanish-American War

C World War II

D Korean War


Americans at war in cuba

AMERICANS AT WAR IN CUBA


San juan hill

San Juan Hill


The spanish american war 354

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 35

  • In this “splendid little war,” as the diplomat John Hay called it, more Americans died from tropical disease than Spanish guns.

  • Thoroughly beaten, Spain agreed to the Treaty of Paris of 1898.

  • In the treaty, Cuba was freed of Spanish control.

  • Puerto Rico and Guam were ceded to the United States.


The spanish american war 36

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 36

  • The Philippine Islands were sold to the United States for $20 million.

  • The Philippines had presented a special problem to President McKinley.

  • He did not feel that the United States could honorably give them back to Spanish misrule.

  • Other alternatives were trouble fraught.

  • The ill-prepared Philippines might be seized by an aggressive power if given their independence.

  • McKinley claimed that an inner voice told him the United States should keep the Philippines and then give them freedom later.


Philippines

Philippines


The spanish american war 361

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 36

  • The Treaty of Paris was accepted by the Senate over much opposition.

  • William J. Bryan unexpectedly turned out to be its champion.

  • Bryan argued that the war would not officially end until the United States had ratified the pact.

  • We had already taken the islands, and the sooner we accepted the treaty, the sooner the Philippines could be given their independence.

  • After Bryan had used his strong personal influence with certain Democratic Senators, the treaty was approved with only one vote to spare.


Gee practice

GEE PRACTICE

  • One form of imperialism is the extension of a nation's political and economic power

  • through the acquisition of territory. Which of the following conflicts involved THIS FORM OF American imperialism?

  • A The Civil War

  • B The Spanish-American War

  • C World War I

  • D World War II


Puerto rico 36

PUERTO RICO 36

  • The Foraker Act of 1900 gave Puerto Rico the status of an unincorporated territory.

  • This meant that Puerto Rico was not destined for statehood.

  • Congress provided that the President of the United States would appoint the island’s governor and the upper house of the Puerto Rican legislature but that the Puerto Ricans elect the lower house.


Mean what you say

MEAN WHAT YOU SAY!

  • SPEAK

  • SOFTLY


Puerto rico

Puerto Rico


Puerto rico 361

PUERTO RICO 36

  • In 1917 the Jones Act granted the Puerto Ricans American citizenship and the right to elect both houses of the Puerto Rican legislature.

  • In 1947 Congress passed a law to permit the Puerto Ricans to elect their own governor.

  • Congress empowered the Puerto Ricans to draw up their own constitution. They chose to be freely associated with the United States as a self-governing commonwealth.


Puerto rico 362

PUERTO RICO 36

  • Puerto Ricans can elect their own legislators and governor.

  • These officials pass and enforce laws.

  • Puerto Ricans are American citizens. While on the island, however, they do not vote in Presidential elections and do not elect Congressmen.

  • They do send a Resident Commissioner to Washington with power to speak, but not to vote, on measures before the House of Representatives.


Puerto rico 363

PUERTO RICO 36

  • Puerto Ricans are subject to most federal laws.

  • They serve in the American armed forces, and their products enter the mainland free of tariff duties.

  • Income taxes are not levied on the citizens or corporations of the island.

  • Some Puerto Ricans want statehood, others want independence, and some want to continue as a Commonwealth.


Cuba 37

CUBA 37

  • After the Spanish-American War, an American military government was set up under General Leonard Wood.

  • Under his leadership, an attack was launched on yellow fever.

  • Experiments were performed by Dr. Walter Reed and others upon American soldiers who volunteered as human guinea pigs.

  • A mosquito was proved to be the lethal carrier.

  • A cleanup of breeding places for mosquitoes wiped out yellow fever in Havana, while at the same time removing the recurrent fears of epidemics in cities of the South and the Atlantic seaboard.


The age of imperilaism

Cuba


Cuba 371

CUBA 37

  • The United States honored its pledge in the Teller Amendment and withdrew from Cuba in 1902.

  • The United States was afraid that a grasping power like Germany might take over Cuba.

  • The Cubans were therefore forced, despite their protests, to write into their constitution of 1901 the Platt Amendment.

  • It provided the Cuba would not sign any foreign treaty that threatened her independence.

  • The United States was allowed to intervene to preserve Cuban independence and to protect life, liberty, and property.

  • The United States was granted naval bases. Under this provision, Cuba leased to the United States the strategic naval base at Guantanamo Bay.


Cuba 372

CUBA 37

  • Using the Platt Amendment, the United States intervened four times to restore order in Cuba and safeguard American lives and investments.

  • These interventions caused considerable resentment among Cuban nationalists.

  • In 1933, however, although Cuba was in the midst of another revolt, President Franklin Roosevelt did not intervene.

  • Instead in 1934, as part of the Good Neighbor Policy, he abrogated the Platt Amendment.

  • With Cuban consent, the United States retained the naval base at Guantanamo Bay.


Cuba 373

CUBA 37

  • The United States continued to dominate the Cuban economy, even after the repeal of the Platt Amendment.

  • Americans had over $1 billion invested in Cuba.

  • The United States provided the chief source of Cuban imports of manufactured goods.

  • The United States was the chief market for Cuban agricultural and mineral exports.

  • Cuba served as a vacation spot for many Americans.


Cuba 374

CUBA 37

  • In 1959 rebels led by Fidel Castro overthrew the dictatorship of Batista and seized power.

  • As Castro aligned himself with the Communist world, relations between Cuba and the United States deteriorated.


Castro

Castro

  • CUBA FALLS TO

  • COMMUNISM

  • WHAT DOES THAT

  • MEAN?


The panama canal 38

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • Americans had long wanted a canal to shorten the boat trip between our east and west coasts and to lower the cost of transporting goods.

  • The Spanish-American War showed the need for a canal to provide greater mobility for our naval fleets, to protect our new colonial empire, and to further commerce with the Far East.


The panama canal 381

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • In the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty of 1850 the United States and Great Britain agreed to share control of any canal across Central America.

  • In 1901 Secretary of State John Hay negotiated the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty by which Britain permitted the United States to go ahead without her in building and operating the canal.

  • In return the United States pledged to let ships of all nations use the canal.


The panama canal 382

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • Ferdinand de Lesseps, who had built the Suez canal, attempted to construct a canal in Panama.

  • After his failure and the ratification of the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, the United States agreed to pay $40 million to Lesseps’ company for its property and franchise rights.


The panama canal 383

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • In 1903 Secretary Hay negotiated a treaty with Colombia to pay that nation $10 million and an annual rental of $250,000 for the right to build a canal across her northern province of Panama.

  • The treaty was rejected by the Colombian Senate because it hoped for better terms the following year when the French company’s franchise would expire.

  • Rejection of the treaty worried the French canal company, inflamed the people of Panama, and angered Roosevelt.


The panama canal 384

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • Roosevelt privately expressed the wish to see Panama independent of Colombia.

  • Shortly afterwards a revolt broke out.

  • The United States openly aided the revolt by sending naval vessels to prevent Colombian troops from entering Panama.

  • Later, Roosevelt boasted, “I took the Canal Zone.”

  • Roosevelt’s actions earned this country ill will throughout Latin America.

  • In 1921 the United States attempted to appease Colombia by paying her $25 million.


The panama canal 385

THE PANAMA CANAL 38

  • Hay negotiated a treaty with the new Republic of Panama, whose minister was the former official of the French company, Philippe Bunau-Varilla.

  • The treaty provided for American control in perpetuity of the Canal Zone, a strip of land 10 miles wide across the isthmus.

  • American intervention was permitted if it was necessary to preserve order.

  • Panama had to be paid an annual rental of $250,000 and also another payment of $10 million.

  • George M. Goethals, an army engineer, was put in charge of building the canal. To solve the problem of the uneven terrain, Goethals built huge locks to raise and lower ships. In 1914 the fifty-mile long canal was opened to traffic.


Panama canal

Panama Canal


The panama canal 39

THE PANAMA CANAL 39

  • William Gorgas, an army medical officer, wiped out malaria and yellow fever in the Canal Zone.

  • By maintaining proper sanitation, Gorgas enabled the workers to complete the canal.

  • To protect the canal, the United States fortified the Canal Zone.

  • It extended influence over the nations bordering the Caribbean, thus converting the Caribbean into an American lake.

  • The United States maintained military bases throughout the Caribbean, notably in Puerto Rico and at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.

  • In 1917 the United States purchased the Virgin Islands from Denmark.


The age of imperilaism

The Roosevelt Corollary, which said that the United States would intervene when countriesin the Western Hemisphere became unstable, was an “extension” made by President —

A Theodore Roosevelt to the Monroe Doctrine.

B Theodore Roosevelt to the Open Door Policy.

C Franklin Roosevelt to the Good Neighbor Policy.

D Franklin Roosevelt to the Truman Doctrine.


The age of imperilaism

The acquisition of the Hawaiian Islands in 1898 was a result of United States —

A Imperialism.

B Progressivism.

C Socialism.

D Isolationism.


The age of imperilaism

Americans in the late 19th century who favored the annexation of the Hawaiian

Islands MOST commonly supported their position by pointing out Hawaii’s —

A rich mineral resources.

B highly skilled population.

C industrial strength.

D strategic location.


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