The bent willow pole method
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THE BENT WILLOW POLE METHOD. BIOENGINEERING: The use of living plant materials to stabilize streambanks. Most bioengineering gives Mother Nature a jump start (plant those native species, tall, short, fast growing, slow growing, etc.).

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THE BENT WILLOW POLE METHOD

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THE BENT WILLOW POLE METHOD


BIOENGINEERING: The use of living plant materials to stabilize streambanks

Most bioengineering gives Mother Nature a jump start (plant those native species, tall, short, fast growing, slow growing, etc.)


THE BENT WILLOW POLE METHOD, SULPHUR CREEK, REDDING, CA.


THE BENT WILLOW POLE METHOD

  • A John McCullah invention

  • This technique is used to integrate large willow poles behind (landward of) a riprap protection scheme

  • Poles can be laid on the bank (butt ends in water or vaidose zone), covered with riprap, then the upper ends bent to a vertical position, then rocks wedged behind pole to keep pole oriented vertically

  • Allows willows to grow in some areas (UP BANK) where naturally it might be too dry for vigorous willow growth

Mini case study: 1 of 25


Unique willow pole transportation

Mini case study: 2 of 25


This method invented by John McCullah!

From: www.E-SenSS.com

Self-Filtering Stone can be used in this application

Mini case study: 3 of 25

Riprap can also be soil choked, seeded, planted


Option

LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Grade the bank to the appropriate angle

Locked Logs (not used in John’s example) would be angled downstream 30 degrees

Mini case study: 4 of 25


Option

LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Grade the bank to the appropriate angle

Horizontal Root Wads can also be used, flow should be straight into the root wad (in compression)

Mini case study: 5 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Install gravel-cobble granular filter

Mini case study: 6 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Install willow poles (to be used as the Bent Willow Pole Method)

Mini case study: 7 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method installation-slope bank & lay willow poles in place

Pix from John McCullah

Mini case study: 8 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Start to install riprap

Mini case study: 9 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

More riprap

Bent Willow Pole Method (underlying willow bent up, then next stone placed)

Mini case study: 10 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Bent Willow Pole Method

Mini case study: 11 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method-bend willows up, install stone, then bend next higher row of willows, add stone.

Pix from John McCullah

Mini case study: 12 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

More riprap

Mini case study: 13 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Bent Willow Pole Method

Mini case study: 14 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method-8 months after installation

Pix from John McCullah

Mini case study: 15 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method-after 4 growing seasons, note fence was removed

Pix from John McCullah

Mini case study: 16 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method during a high flow event-Dec 27, 2006

Pix from John McCullah

Mini case study: 17 of 25


Cottonwood from live stake

The Bent Willow Pole Method June 1, 2008

Pix from Dave Derrick

Mini case study: 18 of 25


The Bent Willow Pole Method June 1, 2008, close-up of willows

Pix from Dave Derrick

Mini case study: 19 of 25


POSSIBLE VARIATION

Plant some rooted-stock trees & shrubs within riprap area (in addition to the Bent Willow Poles)

Mini case study: 20 of 25


Install Brush Layering

LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Mini case study: 21 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Install rooted-stock plants

Mini case study: 22 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Soil-choke riprap

Mini case study: 23 of 25


LPSTP weighted toe with paved midbank– Upper bank sloped & vegetated

Hydroseed all disturbed areas

Mini case study: 24 of 25


DONE

Mini case study: 24 of 25


MAKE IT A SHOWCASE!!

  • Anything that should be along the stream corridor that is missing?

  • Diversity: native plant assemblage (large variety of species and age)

  • Native plants to out-compete non-natives?

  • Wildlife / bird attractors-nesting

  • Food sources: native pear-apple, crabapple, oak, berries

  • Vines? Ground cover? Trumpet vines?

  • Hummingbirds - butterflies - pollinators-insect attractors?

  • Year round color: budding trees in spring (dogwood, redbud,) colorful flowering plants in summer (native azaleas, mountain laurel), fall and winter color (maples), trees that have unusual colored leaves-berries in fall winter?

  • Good urban plants? Pollution tolerant?


Adventitious Rooting Plants(when trunk or branches are in contact with soil the plant will sprout roots)

  • Banker’s Willow-Salix x cottetii, Streamco Willow-Salix purpurea, Black Willow-Salix nigra, Pussy Willow-Salix discolor, & Crack, Autumn etc.

  • Red Osier Dogwood-Cornus stolonifera

  • Silky Dogwood-Cornus amomum

  • Buttonbush-Cephalanthus occidentalis

  • Sycamore-Platanus occidentalis

  • Cottonwood-Populus deltoides

  • Box Elder-Acer negundo

  • Speckled Elder-(bark was scarred)- Alnus rugosa

  • Elderberry-Sambucus Canadensis

  • Elm-Ulmus Americana

  • Bois d'arc, Mock Orange, Bow Wood, Hedge Apple, Horse Apple, Osage Orange- all are Maclura pomifera. 

  • River Birch- (Betula nigra)

  • Black Locust- (Robinia psedoacacia)

  • Northern Catalpa- (Catalpa speciosa)

  • Mulefat- (Baccharis salicifolia)

Anyone know of any others???


ADVENTITIOUS ROOTING PLANTS NEED TO BE PLANTED WHEN THE PLANTS ARE DORMANT {AFTER THE LEAVES HAVE DROPPED & BEFORE THE LEAF BUDS APPEAR IN THE SPRING}


This PowerPoint presentation was developed & built by Dave Derrick. Any questions or comments, call my personal cell @ 601-218-7717, or email @ d_derrick@r2d-eng.comEnjoy the information!!


THAT’S ALL FOR NOW FOLKS !!!!


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