Museum entrance
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Welcome to the Museum of Ireland . Museum Entrance. Clothing. Customs. Location. Currency. Curator’s Offices. Curator’s Office. Ashley Keys. -From Mulvane, Ks -Studied at Emporia State University -Majoring in Elementary Education. Place your picture here. [email protected]

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Museum Entrance

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Museum entrance

Welcome to the Museum of Ireland

Museum Entrance

Clothing

Customs

Location

Currency

Curator’s

Offices


Curator s office

Curator’s Office

Ashley Keys

-From Mulvane, Ks

-Studied at Emporia State University

-Majoring in Elementary Education

Place your picture here.

[email protected]

Return to Entry

Note: Virtual museums were first introduced by educators at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. This template was designed by Dr. Christy Keeler. View the Educational Virtual Museums website for more information on this instructional technique.


Room 1

Currency

Room 1

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Entry


Room 2

Clothing

Room 2

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Room 3

Customs

Room 3

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Room 4

Location

Room 4

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Currency

Currency

The euro is the currency of the Republic of Ireland.

One euro consists of 100 cent.

Notes are €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200 and €500.

Coins are 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, €1 and €2.

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Clothing

Clothing

-Men in Ireland are often seen wearing linen driving caps

-Aran sweaters are a historical part of Irish culture. Clan Arans used to be very popular. Each family clan had its own unique stitching or pattern that was used in their sweaters.

-Tweed is another fabric traditionally noted in Irish culture. In the past, looms were used to create the tweed fabrics, and these methods are still used in modern times to make high quality tweed

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Customs

Customs

-Legend has it that leprechauns are descendants of the mythical Tuatha De Danann, who could enter or leave Ireland through magic doors in the earth. Folklore hints at craftily stored pots of leprechaun gold hidden all over Ireland..

-St. Patrick, who lived from 390 to 461 A.D., is the patron saint of Ireland. History credits him with converting the Irish to Christianity. Famously, he used the shamrock to illustrate the concept of the Holy Trinity, and drove all the snakes -- perhaps symbolically the devil -- out of Ireland. The annual St. Patrick’s Day Festival in Dublin is a celebration attended by people from all over Ireland and worldwide.

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Location

Location

An island in the eastern part of the North Atlantic directly west of the United Kingdom, on the continental shelf of Europe, Ireland covers an area of 70,280 sqkm. Comparatively, the area occupied by Ireland is slightly larger than the state of West Virginia. The Irish Republic is bounded on the N by the North Channel, which separates it from Scotland; on the NE by Northern Ireland; and on the E and SE by the Irish Sea and St. George's Channel, which separate it from England and Wales. To the W , from north to south, the coast is washed by the Atlantic Ocean.

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Flag of ireland

Flag of Ireland

Ireland’s flag has three equal vertical bands of green, white, and orange; officially the flag colors have no meaning, but a common interpretation is that the green represents the Irish nationalist tradition of Ireland; orange represents the Orange tradition; white symbolizes peace between the green and the orange.

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