Ma123 spring 2003 sections 001 003
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Ma123: Spring 2003 Sections 001-003. Dr. Paul Eakin:Instructor www.msc.uky.edu/paul Jessica Virgin:Recitation Leader . Principal Course Features. 4 tests: 3 midterm and final Each test 100 points 90 from uniform exam (curved) 10 from homework (not curved) 50 points instructor grade

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Ma123: Spring 2003 Sections 001-003

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Ma123: Spring 2003Sections 001-003

Dr. Paul Eakin:Instructor www.msc.uky.edu/paul

Jessica Virgin:Recitation Leader


Principal Course Features

  • 4 tests: 3 midterm and final

    • Each test 100 points

      • 90 from uniform exam (curved)

      • 10 from homework (not curved)

    • 50 points instructor grade

      • 20 pts recitation attendance (= 5 pts per exam)

      • 30 pts recitation (See section leader syllabus)

    • Total 450 points in course

  • Web-based homework

  • Mathskeller


Web Based Homework Systemwww.mathclass.com

  • Requires WHS account

    • Already exists if pre-registered

    • Initial login and password arestudent number

    • Need to create your account if not pre-enrolled

      • Easy

      • People in Mathskeller will help you do it

  • Individual homework

    • Similar to common set used for class discussion

    • Must be done by expiration date to get credit

    • Counts 10% of test grades


Mathskellerwww.mathskeller.com

  • In basement of the classroom building

    • Double red doors near loading dock

  • Access to and help with web homework

  • Free printing of homework assignments

  • Where instructors and section leaders have office hours

  • Free tutoring for exams and homework

  • General math study area


The WHS Homework System

1. Start by going tohttp://www.mathclass.com orhttp://www.mathclass.org

both point to the same site.

If registered your account

already exists:initial login = student numberinitial password=student number


If you log in using your student number as login and password

2. Select Password Modificationand change your passwordUse at least 8 characters with at

Least two letters of different cases,

A number, and a punctuation mark or

symbol

1. Select Account Modificationand enter your correct email addressYour email is then your login


If you are not already RegisteredYou will need to create your own account

1. Move mouse overWeb Homework

2. SelectRegister and follow instructions(People in Mathskeller will help you do this )


Announcements Page

Class Announcements:prepared and maintained by

your section leader

Course syllabus/homepage: Things that apply to all sections of MA123Exam dates, rooms, grade computation, etc.

Class syllabus/homepage:Organization of your recitation section, how your instructor grade will be determined


Homework

1. At the Assignments link select the class then select an assignment: The Personal Version is your homework for that assignment. This is the work you must do to get homework credit for the assignmentThe Common Version will be the same every time the bar is pressed. Thus “problem 3” on the common version is well defined. The system return the answer to a problem only after the expiration date for the assignment.


Recommended Approach to the Homework

  • Start on an assignment as early as possible

  • Print your personal assignments and the common assignments out (its free in Mathskeller)

    • Put them in a notebook

    • Collect solutions with the problems in the notebook

  • Get together (e.g. in Mathskeller) with others in class to work on homework together

  • Get homework assistance from teachers and tutors in Mathskeller

  • Submit answers frequently – use the “comments” windows when you get results to ask teachers about specific problems


First AssignmentExpires FRIDAY, Jan. 17


Checking Your Homework Scores

1.Place mouse on Homework Scores

2. Select class

3. Press “Show Scores”


Select any Set of Homeworks

Press Average to get

your average on those

assignments


TopicsRefer to text book from Page 5 to 35 in Chapter 0

  • Quadratic Formula and Applications Polynomial multiplication

  • Definition of Function

  • Composition of Functions

  • Piecewise defined functions (notation)

  • Domain of Functions

  • Graphs and their interpretation


If A and B are sets of numbers a function

f: A -> B is a rule which assigns to each element of x in A a unique element f(x) in B.The set A is called the domain of f. When not given explicitly the domain of f is the largest set of numbers for which the rule makes sense

Example:

Functions

( )


The Graph of a Function

  • If f is a function then the graph of f is the set of all ordered pairs (x, f(x)) where x is in the domain of f.

  • Since ordered pairs can be thought of as coordinates of points on a plane the graph can be thought of as a subset of the plane

  • Any specific visualization is a sketch of the graph


If f is a function the zeroes or roots of f are all of the elements r in its domain such that f ( r ) = 0

Alternatively the roots of f are all solutions to the equation f(x) = 0

Roots of

Solutions to

Places where graph crosses the x-axis

Zeroes (roots) of Functionsand Roots of Equations


Functions whose Roots can be found exactly

  • Linear functions

    • f(x) = ax + b

    • Graph = straight line

    • Root = -b/a if a not 0

  • Quadratic Functions

    • Graph is parabola

    • Roots given by quadratic formula


Quadratic Equation


There are “quadratic equation-type” formulas for:

  • Cubic

  • Quartic

  • Known over 500 years

  • Complicated, Not commonly used

  • There cannot be such a formula for any higher degree equation


Piecewise Defined Functions and their Graphs

  • F(x) =


ASSIGNMENT:

  • Complete Homework 1 by Friday (night)

  • Begin work on Homework 2 (Due Tuesday)

    • Refer to text book from Page 37 to 48 in Chapter 1

  • Turn in 3 by 5 card Monday with:

    • Name

    • Section (or recitation time)

    • Average scores on each of HW 1 and HW 2

    • After card #5 each such card counts one point toward total point final (up to 20).


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