Heart  Minds Marine Safety Training     C-MTA Peter Blok 2007

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Heart Minds Marine Safety Training C-MTA Peter Blok 2007

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1. 1 Heart & Minds Marine Safety Training C-MTA Peter Blok 2007

2. 2 Introduction on flipchart: Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this? Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this?

3. 3

4. 4

5. 5 Shell Group initiatives 2006: Why are the Golden Rules so important for Shell? Because we work in a hazardous environment in dangerous circumstances I’m convinced that our Golden Rules make it clear to anybody what we stand for when we’re talking about safety Our Golden Rules are mandatory for everybody in Shell, no exceptions for anybody or any situation. They have to be followed! Everybody should implement them into their personal working environment, to dictate their daily behaviour and day-to-day decisions. Of course they are not particularly new. We all know them, but unfortunately we don’t follow them all of the time. Why are the Golden Rules so important for Shell? Because we work in a hazardous environment in dangerous circumstances I’m convinced that our Golden Rules make it clear to anybody what we stand for when we’re talking about safety Our Golden Rules are mandatory for everybody in Shell, no exceptions for anybody or any situation. They have to be followed! Everybody should implement them into their personal working environment, to dictate their daily behaviour and day-to-day decisions. Of course they are not particularly new. We all know them, but unfortunately we don’t follow them all of the time.

6. HSE Golden Rules Three HSE Golden rules have been adopted by the Shell Group to help further improve HSE performance: Nicoline: Nico, let’s have a look at the rules. What are they?   Nico: 1………….. 2…………... 3…………….   Nicoline: A clear and simple message, but as you said: nothing new. Why do you think these rules are “smart” enough to work?   Nicoline: Nico, let’s have a look at the rules. What are they?   Nico: 1………….. 2…………... 3…………….   Nicoline: A clear and simple message, but as you said: nothing new. Why do you think these rules are “smart” enough to work?  

7. 7 Why Do We Need Them

8. 8 Leadership At Every Level

9. 9 Safety Video Listen to professor James Reason Note some topics on “post-it” Show DVD

10. 10 Notes on flipchart: Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this? Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this?

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12. 12 Presenter Notes This slide shows a smoothed out version of the safety performance for Shell and other major Oil and Gas companies. It shows significant improvements in safety have been made through applying technology and standards. Later, introducing HSE Management Systems improved performance by providing assurance that the technology and standards were applied consistently. Nowadays we have HSE management systems but continuous improvement requires creating a culture in which people are intrinsically motivated to operate the elements of the Management System. Otherwise they are just paper, to bring it to life a key element in doing this is changing peoples behaviours and attitudes to be more safety focused. This can only be done sustainably through building a stronger HSE culture. We are not there yet, which is why we need to understand our current HSE Culture. Presenter Notes This slide shows a smoothed out version of the safety performance for Shell and other major Oil and Gas companies. It shows significant improvements in safety have been made through applying technology and standards. Later, introducing HSE Management Systems improved performance by providing assurance that the technology and standards were applied consistently. Nowadays we have HSE management systems but continuous improvement requires creating a culture in which people are intrinsically motivated to operate the elements of the Management System. Otherwise they are just paper, to bring it to life a key element in doing this is changing peoples behaviours and attitudes to be more safety focused. This can only be done sustainably through building a stronger HSE culture. We are not there yet, which is why we need to understand our current HSE Culture.

13. 13 Behavioural programme development To help manage the holes in the Swiss cheese, we have many tools and techniques which form the HSE-MS. However mechanistically doing this is not enough. What is missing is people have to want to manage HSE, they need to be motivated to bring the HSE-MS to life in their everyday work. This is the only way they will be able to successfully manage non-routine situations.To help manage the holes in the Swiss cheese, we have many tools and techniques which form the HSE-MS. However mechanistically doing this is not enough. What is missing is people have to want to manage HSE, they need to be motivated to bring the HSE-MS to life in their everyday work. This is the only way they will be able to successfully manage non-routine situations.

14. 14

15. 15

16. 16 If you always do what you did, You always get what you got.

17. 17 skills, attitude and knowledge are all needed.

18. 18

19. 19 Notes on flipchart: Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this? Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this?

20. 20

21. 21 Culture Ladder Safety Culture Ladder The best way to understand our culture is in terms of an evolutionary ladder. Each level has distinct characteristics and is a progression on the one before. Looking at it like this provides a route map, where every team, or company has a certain level of cultural maturity and can see which rung of the ladder they are on, where they have been and what the next step looks like. The range runs from the Pathological, through the Reactive to the Calculative and then on to Proactive and the final stage, that we call the Generative. Pathological,the stage I hope you already passed, is where people don’t really care about Safety let alone Health and the Environment, and are only driven by regulatory compliance and or not getting caught. We probably all recognise this from the past but is something we have hopefully move beyond. Reactive, is where safety is taken seriously, but only when gets sufficient attention after things have already gone wrong. People say things like “it’s a dangerous business”, or “you have to understand it is different here”, “you have to look out for yourself”, or “those who have the accidents are those who cause them”. (I CANNOT REALLY ADD ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH YET) Up to here these levels have the attitude It’s dangerous business, look out for yourself, who have the accidwnts are those who caused them.In this respect the diffrence on reactive is that you start getting frustrated. At the reactive level managers take safety seriously, but feel frustrated about how the workforce won’t do what they are told. ‘If only they would do what they are supposed to’, ‘we need to force compliance’. The next level, Calculative, is where an organization is comfortable with systems and numbers. The HSE-MS has been implemented successfully and because HSE is taken very seriously, there is a major concentration upon the statistics – bonuses are tied to them, contractors are rated in terms of their safety record, not just because they are the cheapest. Lots of data is collected and analysed, we are comfortable making process and system changes. There is a plethora of audits and people begin to feel they have cracked it. Nevertheless businesses at this level still have fatalities and are surprised when these occur. Proactive is where Shell EP is aiming for. It is moving away from from managing HSE based on what has happened in the past to really looking forward. Not just working to prevent last week’s accident, it is starting to consider what might go wrong in the future and take steps before being are forced to. Proactive organisations are those where the workforce start to be involved in practice, as well as in management statements of intent. Unlike the Calculative, where the HSE department still shoulders a lot of the responsibility, in Proactive organisations the Line begins to take over the HSE function, while HSE personnel reduce in numbers and provide advice rather than execution. Indicators become increasingly process-oriented – are we doing the right things? - rather than just focused on incidents – have we had any accidents? It is quite simply about creating an environment that encourages the behaviours and beliefs that will deliver lasting improvements in our performance both HSE and beyond.  Safety Culture Ladder The best way to understand our culture is in terms of an evolutionary ladder. Each level has distinct characteristics and is a progression on the one before. Looking at it like this provides a route map, where every team, or company has a certain level of cultural maturity and can see which rung of the ladder they are on, where they have been and what the next step looks like. The range runs from the Pathological, through the Reactive to the Calculative and then on to Proactive and the final stage, that we call the Generative. Pathological,the stage I hope you already passed, is where people don’t really care about Safety let alone Health and the Environment, and are only driven by regulatory compliance and or not getting caught. We probably all recognise this from the past but is something we have hopefully move beyond. Reactive, is where safety is taken seriously, but only when gets sufficient attention after things have already gone wrong. People say things like “it’s a dangerous business”, or “you have to understand it is different here”, “you have to look out for yourself”, or “those who have the accidents are those who cause them”. (I CANNOT REALLY ADD ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH YET) Up to here these levels have the attitude It’s dangerous business, look out for yourself, who have the accidwnts are those who caused them.In this respect the diffrence on reactive is that you start getting frustrated. At the reactive level managers take safety seriously, but feel frustrated about how the workforce won’t do what they are told. ‘If only they would do what they are supposed to’, ‘we need to force compliance’. The next level, Calculative, is where an organization is comfortable with systems and numbers. The HSE-MS has been implemented successfully and because HSE is taken very seriously, there is a major concentration upon the statistics – bonuses are tied to them, contractors are rated in terms of their safety record, not just because they are the cheapest. Lots of data is collected and analysed, we are comfortable making process and system changes. There is a plethora of audits and people begin to feel they have cracked it. Nevertheless businesses at this level still have fatalities and are surprised when these occur. Proactive is where Shell EP is aiming for. It is moving away from from managing HSE based on what has happened in the past to really looking forward. Not just working to prevent last week’s accident, it is starting to consider what might go wrong in the future and take steps before being are forced to. Proactive organisations are those where the workforce start to be involved in practice, as well as in management statements of intent. Unlike the Calculative, where the HSE department still shoulders a lot of the responsibility, in Proactive organisations the Line begins to take over the HSE function, while HSE personnel reduce in numbers and provide advice rather than execution. Indicators become increasingly process-oriented – are we doing the right things? - rather than just focused on incidents – have we had any accidents? It is quite simply about creating an environment that encourages the behaviours and beliefs that will deliver lasting improvements in our performance both HSE and beyond.  

22. 22 Culture Ladder – Overview Presenters notes This is an optional exercise to engage participants and wet their appetite for the real exercise. You present the levels one at a time and ask people to raise their hands if, recently they have heard anyone say any of the things written next to that level of maturity or if they think the statements describe their work environment. If there is enthusiasm you can ask people with their hands up for an example. As an organisation climbs up the ladder there the level of informedness and trust increases with people offering to accept accountabilities (‘you can count on me’) rather than just being told they will be held accountable for some outcome. Informedness is about mangers knowing what is happening in their organisation and where all the problems are, and the workforce knowing exactly what managers expect – no mixed messages. Because managers and workers are aligned, this builds two-way trust. Because people know what is expected and are trusted to do it, there is less need for bureaucracy, audits and supervision, so workload decreases from after the Calculative stage Generative organizations set very high standards and attempt to exceed them rather than be satisfied with minimum compliance. They are brutally honest about failure, but use it to improve, not to blame. They don’t expect to get it right, they just expect to get better. Management knows what is really going on, because the workforce is willing to tell them and trusts them not to over-react on hearing bad news. People live in a state of chronic unease, trying to be as informed as possible, because it prepares them for whatever will be thrown at them next. Generative organisation in which event happen too fast (flight carrier) day-to-day dangers have to be managed those on the spot. They operate in 2 modes. Officers create situation that allowes preperation take place and deckcrew controls in front in different operational mode by unceasing dedication to get it right. Low rate incident Active involvement crew People are willing to be held to account for their actions Telling each others about what works Presenters notes This is an optional exercise to engage participants and wet their appetite for the real exercise. You present the levels one at a time and ask people to raise their hands if, recently they have heard anyone say any of the things written next to that level of maturity or if they think the statements describe their work environment. If there is enthusiasm you can ask people with their hands up for an example. As an organisation climbs up the ladder there the level of informedness and trust increases with people offering to accept accountabilities (‘you can count on me’) rather than just being told they will be held accountable for some outcome. Informedness is about mangers knowing what is happening in their organisation and where all the problems are, and the workforce knowing exactly what managers expect – no mixed messages. Because managers and workers are aligned, this builds two-way trust. Because people know what is expected and are trusted to do it, there is less need for bureaucracy, audits and supervision, so workload decreases from after the Calculative stage Generative organizations set very high standards and attempt to exceed them rather than be satisfied with minimum compliance. They are brutally honest about failure, but use it to improve, not to blame. They don’t expect to get it right, they just expect to get better. Management knows what is really going on, because the workforce is willing to tell them and trusts them not to over-react on hearing bad news. People live in a state of chronic unease, trying to be as informed as possible, because it prepares them for whatever will be thrown at them next. Generative organisation in which event happen too fast (flight carrier) day-to-day dangers have to be managed those on the spot. They operate in 2 modes. Officers create situation that allowes preperation take place and deckcrew controls in front in different operational mode by unceasing dedication to get it right. Low rate incident Active involvement crew People are willing to be held to account for their actions Telling each others about what works

23. 23

24. 24

25. 25 Background

26. 26

27. 27 Background

28. 28

29. 29 Background

30. 30

31. 31 Background

32. 32

33. 33 Wrap up on flipchart: Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this? Column 1: Why work safely? Not get hurt Do not hurt others Makes the boss happy Wife / family Column 2: Why not? . It’s quicker . I know best . Experience . Comfort . Time / work pressure Column 3. Do we do this?

34. 34

35. 35

36. A Just and fair Culture Integrates understanding of different types of violation and their causes Individuals will be working with a variety of intentions, from the company’s interest to their personal gain Managers and supervisors have a role as well as the violating worker Defines accountabilities at all levels Meets visual requirements for priorities

39. Consequence Management

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