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TODAY’S KNOWLEDGE A NEW METHOD A WORSHOP BY: MS. HELENA MOHAMED - MOHAMED SALLAM AHMADY EDUCATIONAL AREA December 2011 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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TODAY’S KNOWLEDGE A NEW METHOD A WORSHOP BY: MS. HELENA MOHAMED - MOHAMED SALLAM AHMADY EDUCATIONAL AREA December 2011. Have a look at these words. Internet 1985 Laptop 1984 Google 2001 Cell phone 1984 Search engine 1984 Website

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TODAY’S KNOWLEDGE A NEW METHOD A WORSHOP BY: MS. HELENA MOHAMED - MOHAMED SALLAM AHMADY EDUCATIONAL AREA December 2011

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TODAY’S KNOWLEDGE

A NEW METHOD

A WORSHOP BY:

MS. HELENA MOHAMED - MOHAMED SALLAM

AHMADY EDUCATIONAL AREA

December 2011


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Have a look at these words

Internet

1985

Laptop

1984

Google

2001

Cell phone

1984

Search engine

1984

Website

1992

E-mail

1982

Chat room

1986

Mp3

1996


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Task 1

What do you call this age?

Why are kids so brilliant and good at video games ?

What do you think of today’s classrooms?

List the digital items that you use on daily basis?


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Breakthrough ideas

  • *Gaming world & education

  • Google is to bring together game designers with curriculum experts.

  • Digital media production

  • Public awareness should be raised about what learning in the 21st century should look like

  • -current systems do not support innovation

  • Where should innovation be nurtured

  • Conceptual shift

  • Education to learning

  • Consumption To Participation

  • Institutions to networks


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So how did we learn?

PLATO Universiteit Leiden

PLATO Universiteit Leiden


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How did we learn?

We listened to teachers

We studied books/subjects

We applied our knowledge and made assignments

We answered questions

We rehearsed

Our work was assessed

We passed or failed

We became knowledgeable


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And how do we learn today?


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How do we learn today?

We search and scan

We contact experts or peers

We read, watch, zap, chat, skype,

We plan and act

We tap and download

We copy and paste

We produce, create and design

We present results, build portfolios

We discuss and debate

We apply and share

We (try to) become competent


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Change

The learner


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Change

What do we know about today’s learners?


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The digital learner

  • Children today:

  • learn differently as a result of their participation with digital media.

  • are digitallyliterateoutsideschool not in school.

  • It seems that schools are falling behind our kids.

  • There is a gap between those who know how to use and participate with digitalmedia and those who do not.


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My social Life

My work

My school(s)

My calendar

My profile

My hobbies

My files

My identity

My publications

E-portfolios

My conversations(s)


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They are…..Digital Natives

Parallel processing and multitasking

Graphics BEFORE text

5,000 hours reading

10,000 hours playing video games

20,000 hours watching television….

At their age, current 40 year old adults had spent 12,000 hours reading


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Changing…

The digital teacher


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Task 2

  • How should teachers be?

  • How does someone who learned in a totally traditional setting learn to teach in an entirely different way ?

  • New strategies

  • New teaching skills

  • Newmediaskills

  • New innovative ideas

  • Tempo & pace


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What does this mean?Teachers make the difference!

It’s time to…

C

H

A

N

G

E


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Teachers of the digital age

  • help learners construct knowledge for themselves

  • encourage multiple perspectives

  • use multiple ICT tools rather than only the printed text

  • promote creative and innovative thinking over memorization


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Traditional Teacher

Leads students to

one “right” answer

Presents information

lecture-style

Favors having

students work on their own

Directs studentsto mimic the steps

Teacher

Traditional

Shows students how to solve problems

Evaluates students

with paper-and-pencil

tests


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Teachers of the digital age

Asks provoking, open-ended

questions

Designs projects for

students to tackle

Modifies lessons for higher-ability

and lower-ability students

Makes use

of media

Forms cooperative groups

willing to change direction of lesson based on student interest and need

Leads students through self-assessment

processes


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Changing…

Digital Schools


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Change


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School of the digital age

  • Schools are supposed to be:

  • Teaching with technology

  • Using new technology

  • Going side by side with technology

  • Making use of the new media

  • Ahead and creating new technologies

  • But actually schools are falling behind.


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The 3T Rule

Things

Take

Time

You don't have to be a "person of influence" to be influential. In fact, the most influential people in my life are probably not even aware of the things they've taught me. ~Scott Adams

Power lasts for ten years - influence for more than a hundred.

~Korean Proverb


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MANAGING COMPLEX CHANGE

+

+

+

+

=

Vision

Skills

Incentives

Resources

Action

Plan

Change

Confusion

+

+

+

=

Skills

Incentives

Resources

Action

Plan

+

+

+

=

Vision

Incentives

Resources

Action

Plan

Anxiety

=

Resistance

+

+

+

Vision

Skills

Resources

Action

Plan

+

=

Frustration

+

+

Vision

Skills

Incentives

Action

Action

Plan

+

+

+

=

Vision

Skills

Incentives

Resources

Treadmill

from Knoster, T.


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THE AGE OF CONNECTION AND THE CONNECTED LEARNER


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learningwith technology

  • Adding technology to existing subjects / courses

  • Converting materials to digital formats

  • Adding computers to classrooms


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Learning in the Age of Connection

  • Always on – continuous computing

  • Laptops, handhelds, mobile phones

  • Invisible, portable information fields

  • Wireless networks

  • Constant connectivity

  • Increased levels of collaboration – beyond the classroom


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Knowledge Society

In the Knowledge Society, every learner is a lifelong learner. The content and the methods of initial education must take into account preparation for lifelong learning. ICT is a key tool for developing lifelong learning. The development of lifelong learning needs an integration of education into the real world - ICT should be used for this purpose. Lifelong learning must be encouraged in all countries, as a tool for reducing the Digital Divide.


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From chain to pyramid and to network..


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  • NETWORKING

  • The Knowledge Society is networked.

  • Networks offer :

  • Ways to access knowledge,

  • Possibilities for networking people

  • Developing collaborative work

  • Enhancing the “collective intelligence”


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George Siemens

ConnectivismA Learning Theory for a Digital Age


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What is learning for George Siemens?


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A New learning theory:

  • Connectivism was introduced as a theory of learning based on the premise that knowledge exists in the world rather than in the head of an individual. Connectivism regards knowledge to exist within systems which are accessed through people participating in activities. It also proposes that people learn through contact. The add-on "a learning theory for the digital age", that appears on Siemens paper indicates the special importance that is given to the effect technology has on how people live, how they communicate, and how they learn.


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Principles of Connectivism

  • Learning and knowledge rest in diversity of opinions.

  • Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.

  • Learning may reside in non-human appliances.

  • Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known


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Principles of connectivism

  • Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.

  • Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.

  • Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.

  • Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality.


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Learning theories


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Behaviourism

  • Stimulus/Response

  • Theorists: Pavlov, Watson, Skinner, Thorndike


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Cognitivism

  • Information processing

  • Input, processing, storage, output

  • Computer-modeled

  • Theorists: Ausubel, Gagne, Bruner, Piaget, Vygotsky


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Constructivism

  • Learning is process of active construction of knowledge

  • Learners make sense of their experiences

  • Theorists: Bruner, Vygotsky, Piaget


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What’s missing?


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Connectivism

  • Learning as a connection-forming process (neural and external)

  • The learning is in the network

  • Diversity

  • “Know where”…know how

  • Pattern recognition


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Learning Theories


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What is the role of the teacher?

  • Among the roles of the teacher in networked learning environments we find:

  • 1. Amplifying2. Way finding and socially-driven 3.sensemaking4. Filtering5. Modeling6. Persistent presence


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What is the role of the teacher?

  • Amplifying: Social media like Twitter provide a few examples of how teacher’s roles might change.

  • Way finding: The network becomes a cognitive agent in this instance – helping the learner to make sense of complex subject areas by relying not only on her own reading and resource exploration


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What is the role of the teacher?

Filtering can be done in explicit ways – such as selecting readings around course topics – or in less obvious ways – such as writing summary blog posts around topics.

Stephen’s statements that resonated with many learners centers on modeling as a teaching practice: “To teach is to model and to demonstrate. To learn is to practice and to reflect.”


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What is the role of the teacher?

Persistent Presence

An educator needs a point of existence online – a place to express herself and be discovered: a blog, profile in a social networking service, Twitter,


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Reflections: against

The idea that connectivism provides a new theory of learning has not received wide acceptance. Verhagen, for instance, has argued that connectivism is not a learning theory, but rather is a "pedagogical view.”

Elaborations fail to include any review of the literature and no mention of prior work in this area. It is quite difficult to evaluate how Connectivism, introduced in the mid-2005, relates to prior theories of social learning


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Reflections: for

Kop and Hill conclude that while it does not seem that connectivism is a separate learning theory, it "continues to play an important role in the development and emergence of new pedagogies, where control is shifting from the tutor to an increasingly more autonomous learner."

Dr. Mohamed Ally at Athabasca University recognizes that world has changed and become more networked, so learning theories developed prior to these global changes are less relevant. However, he argues that, "What is needed is not a new stand-alone theory for the digital age, but a model that integrates the different theories to guide the design of online learning materials.".


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A final remark

Parents send us the best kids they have…they are not keeping better ones at home.


Please visit our blog ahmadyelt wordpress com and our youtube channel www youtube com ahmadyelt l.jpg

Please visit our blogahmadyelt.wordpress.comand our YouTube channel www.youtube.com/ahmadyelt


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