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Survey Article. CMPE 185. What is a Survey Article?. A survey article is a collection of perspectives on a specific subject. May also be thought of as a background essay. Goals for this project. To practice in-depth library research on a specific subject.

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Survey article

Survey Article

CMPE 185


What is a survey article
What is a Survey Article?

  • A survey article is a collection of perspectives on a specific subject.

  • May also be thought of as a background essay.


Goals for this project
Goals for this project

  • To practice in-depth library research on a specific subject.

  • May be used as part of your Final Project, as background or overview.


Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic

  • Recommended: Pick something you’re familiar with.

  • If you choose to cover something you’ve already investigated in a previous project, choose a small aspect of that project.

  • Create a topic statement.


Target audience
Target Audience

  • Your audience has some knowledge of what you’re discussing, but they aren’t experts.

  • You can assume the audience knows roughly as much about the subject matter as you did – before you researched the matter in depth.


Resources
Resources

  • You must cite at least FOUR sources.

    • At least THREE of these must be from printed sources.

    • You may use only ONE source that’s only available online.

    • (If you have access to an online source of an article that is physically printed elsewhere, this is acceptable as a printed source.)

    • You must cite all four sources.

  • Library search

    • Build subject-heading and keyword searches around your topic statement.

    • When you find relevant articles or books, see what those authors cite as references.


More resources
More resources

  • Article Databases (which you should now have experience with) are particularly useful.

    • Pick 3-5 articles to start with.

    • Don’t just pick the first three you find. Choose the most relevant.

  • Be sure to note all citation information.

    • Emailing yourself/photocopying citation information will save you time.

    • Talk to your friendly neighborhood Reference Librarian.


Organize your information
Organize your Information

  • Decide what your main points are.

  • Locate key information from the texts.

  • Present the clearest explanations possible for each topic and subtopic.

  • Keep an eye out for contradictory information.

    • Remember, your job is to present opinions and information, not to judge them.

    • Treat each source fairly.


Example survey article
Example Survey Article

  • Title: The One Penny Admission.

  • TOPIC STATEMENT: The one-penny price of admission to a play in Shakespeare’s time was affordable across social strata.


Note:

  • This is only an outline of a Survey Article.

  • Your Survey Article must be written out.

  • Yes, this has been an issue in the past.


Starting facts
Starting facts:

  • The base admission price at public theaters remained one penny from the 1570’s to 1642.

    • Source: Andrew Gurr, The Shakespearean Stage p.60

  • During that time period, the value of English currency changed drastically.

    • While inflation was limited under Elizabeth I (reigned 1558-1603), English currency lost value under James I (reigned 1603-1625).

      • Source: James Mackey, A Monetary History of England p. 143



  • Price comparisons: different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.

    • “A penny was the cost of a beer or a cheap meal, and only a third the price of a pipe full of tobacco.”

      • E.K. Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage p.37

    • “The industrious artisan earned about 6 shillings a week”

      • Andrew Gurr, The Shakespearean Stage p. 199


Additional material
Additional Material different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.


Quick reference guide to currency in renaissance england
Quick reference guide to currency in Renaissance England different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.

  • A penny is represented as d.

  • A shilling is represented as s.

  • A pound is represented as £.

    Values:

  • 12 pence = 1 shilling

  • 20 shillings = 1 pound

    Other common coins:

    1 crown = 5 shillings

    ½ crown = 2 shillings, 6 pence

    1 angel = 6 shillings

    1 groat = 4 pence


A london hotel menu from 1589
A London hotel menu from 1589 different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.

  • 11:00 AM Dinner:

  • A pece of bief xviii d.

  • Orenges ii d.

  • A loyne of veale iii s

  • 2 chickens xiiii d.

    Evening supper:

  • A shoulder of mutton xvi d.

  • 2 rabettes x d.

  • A pigges pettie toes viii d

  • Colde bief xiii d.

  • Cheese: ii d.

    (Source: M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating p.60)


Admission structure
Admission Structure different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.

  • General admission for new plays = 2 pence

  • General admission for older plays = 1 pence

  • Bottom galleries = additional 1 pence

  • Top gallery = additional 2 pence

  • Hall theaters, general admission = 6 pence


Figure 1: The Old Globe Stage (Courtesy of different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists. The Shakespearean Stage, Andrew Gurr)


Figure 2: The Rose Theatre. (Courtesy of different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists. The Shakespearean Stage, Andrew Gurr)


Figure 3: London Theatres. different classes, including sailors, artisans, merchants, apprentices, and visiting tourists.


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