Chapter 4 reconstruction and the new south
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Chapter 4 RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW SOUTH PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Chapter 4 RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW SOUTH. Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction Section 3: Reconstruction in the South Section 4: The New South. Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction. Objectives:.

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Chapter 4 RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW SOUTH

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Chapter 4RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW SOUTH

Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

Section 4: The New South


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

Objectives:

  • What hopes and expectations did African Americans in the South have for their lives as freedpeople?

  • How did President Lincoln and Congress differ over plans for Reconstruction?

  • How did President Johnson’s programs benefit former Confederates?

  • How did the Black Codes affect freedpeople?


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

African Americans

  • wished to establish churches and schools

  • hoped to legalize marriages

  • hoped to find family members who had been sold away

  • desired ownership of land

  • expected basic human rights


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

Lincoln

  • wanted to abolish slavery

  • wanted to give amnesty to most southerners

  • wished to allow rebel states to rejoin the Union when ten percent of residents who had voted in 1860 pledged loyalty to the Union


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

Congress

  • wanted to abolish slavery

  • wanted to delay Reconstruction until a majority of each state’s white males took a loyalty oath


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

President Johnson’s programs

  • gave blanket pardons for most rebels

  • gave easy terms for readmission into the Union: states had to nullify their acts of secession, abolish slavery, and refuse to pay war debts


Section 1: Presidential Reconstruction

The Black Codes

  • tried to deprive freedpeople of equality

  • re-established white control over African American labor


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Objectives:

  • What issues divided Republicans during the early Reconstruction era?

  • Why did moderates and Radical Republicans join forces, and what actions did they take on behalf of African Americans?

  • Why was President Johnson impeached, and why did the Senate not remove him from office?

  • Why were African Americans crucial to the election of 1868, and how did Republicans respond to their support?


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Radical Republicans

  • wanted to create an entirely new South

  • wanted to give African Americans the right to vote


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Moderate Republicans

  • wanted to restore southern states to the Union

  • wanted to keep former Confederates out of government

  • wanted to give African Americans some civil equality


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Radical and moderate Republicans

  • joined forces to protect African Americans from violence

  • passed Civil Rights Act of 1866, over presidential veto

  • extended the Freedmen’s Bureau, over presidential veto

  • passed the Fourteenth Amendment


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Johnson’s impeachment

  • general dislike of Johnson’s lenient Reconstruction policies

  • Johnson’s violation of the Tenure of Office Act

  • inappropriate speeches and acts


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Johnson’s acquittal

  • weak case

  • overly critical attacks

  • fear that impeachment would weaken future presidents and the system of checks and balances


Section 2: Congressional Reconstruction

Election of 1868

  • African American votes were crucial to getting Ulysses S. Grant elected president.

  • Republicans passed the Fifteenth Amendment, extending the vote to African American men.


Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

Objectives:

  • How did African Americans attempt to improve their lives during the Reconstruction era?

  • What reforms did Republican governments enact?

  • How did some African Americans respond to harassment by the Ku Klux Klan?

  • What caused Reconstruction to end?


Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

African Americans improving their lives

  • registered to vote

  • joined and formed political organizations

  • lobbied for political equality

  • built churches and schools

  • served as delegates to state constitutional conventions


Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

Republican government reforms

  • creation of new state constitutions

  • abolition of property qualifications for jurors and candidates

  • creation of new services

  • construction of new roads and bridges


Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

Responses to Ku Klux Klan

  • retaliation by burning barns

  • lobbying for congressional protection


Section 3: Reconstruction in the South

End of Reconstruction

  • economic problems such as the Panic of 1873

  • immigrant tendency to use universal suffrage to support Democrats

  • dissolution of alliance between northern business people and freed slaves

  • increasing white violence in the South

  • Compromise of 1877


Section 4: The New South

Objectives:

  • What were the drawbacks to the sharecropping system?

  • How did Jim Crow laws and the Plessy v. Ferguson decision change life for southern African Americans?

  • How did African Americans attempt to improve their economic situation after Reconstruction?

  • How did Booker T. Washington and Ida B. Wells think African Americans should respond to Jim Crow laws?


Section 4: The New South

The sharecropping system

  • Sharecroppers had no income until harvest time.

  • System required farmers to rely on one crop only.

  • System left farmers and the region dependent on outsiders for their food supply.


Section 4: The New South

Jim Crow and Plessy v. Ferguson

The Jim Crow laws segregated African Americans, and in Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation was legal.


Section 4: The New South

African American attempts to improve their lives

  • formed societies and cooperatives

  • supported churches and schools

  • supported businessmen


Section 4: The New South

Booker T. Washington

  • wanted African Americans to achieve economic independence

  • discouraged African Americans from protesting discrimination


Section 4: The New South

Ida B. Wells

  • urged African Americans to protest discrimination

  • wanted African Americans to leave the South


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