Vector-borne Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia –
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 13

Vector-borne Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia – Challenges and Opportunities in Vector Collection and Pathogen Detection PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 176 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Vector-borne Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia – Challenges and Opportunities in Vector Collection and Pathogen Detection MAJ Brian Evans, Ph.D.; Jim McAvin; Alongkot Ponlawat, PhD; Ratree Takhampunya, PhD; LTC Jason Richardson, PhD . Mission Intelligence requirements

Download Presentation

Vector-borne Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia – Challenges and Opportunities in Vector Collection and Pathogen Detection

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Vector-borne Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia –

Challenges and Opportunities in Vector Collection and

Pathogen Detection

MAJ Brian Evans, Ph.D.; Jim McAvin; Alongkot Ponlawat, PhD; Ratree

Takhampunya, PhD; LTC Jason Richardson, PhD


Mission

Intelligence requirements

PM detachment capabilities

Detection capabilities (JBAIDS)

Value of pathogen assays

Where is the gap?

Conclusion

Agenda


To accurately asses the risk of vector-borne disease in an AO and to recommend/ implement measures that reduce the disease threat among soldiers.

Mission


Human case data

Vector data (presence/absence)

Pathogen data (presence/absence)

Environmental data

Intelligence Requirements


Pre-deployment intelligence

Gather case data (non-specific/specific)

Limited vector surveillance

Limited or no pathogen detection capability.

PM Detachment Capabilities


Detection Capability


Value of Pathogen Assays

Assumptions:

Case data is specific in number and location.

Vector surveillance, pathogen detection tools, and control tools are effective.


Case data

is valuable!


Adult mosquito/sand fly collection devices minimally effective; taxonomic keys

1 or 2 Ae. aegypti /house (15 mins/house); countless man-hours and houses needed for sufficient sample sizes (1 in 1000 infected); this is an area where there is transmission of dengue year-round.

Where is the gap?


Where is the gap?

BG Sentinel (BG Lure)

Bed net trap - NAMRU-2


Rodent-baited traps as a tool for collecting chigger mites, vectors of scrub typhus.

Where is the gap?

Figure 13: Field caught rodent on snap trap

&

Figure 4: Rodent with chiggers


Low densities; seasonality?

How does pathogen/vector data translate into risk?

What does it mean to have 6 in 1000 infected; should I be concerned?

Even when we know the vector locations and where the pathogen is most prevalent in the vector, do we understand the biology?

Not one-size fits all solutions; same species from different locations may have evolved independently; different vector ecology

Other Challenges?


Bottom-line: Pathogen detection has greatest added value for risk determination and control efficacy in instances where there is limited or no case data. If disease is seasonal, a valuable forecasting tool.

Challenge: Relevancy of pathogen detection data is highly-dependent on the vector surveillance tool.

Pathogen surveillance should be a critical part of the PM mission; need more effective surveillance tools to complement this mission; need trained soldiers who can interpret information/data.

Where time/resources/money are limited, should be very selective about when and where to use pathogen detection assays.

Conclusion


  • Login