Underwater instructors certification course
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Underwater Instructors Certification Course. Los Angeles County. Teaching Theory and Methods.

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Underwater Instructors Certification Course

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Underwater instructors certification course

Underwater Instructors Certification Course

Los Angeles County

Teaching Theory and Methods


Underwater instructors certification course

Teaching scuba is why you are here. Without the right tools, techniques, passion and attitude you are only presenting by rote. By the end of this lecture you be able to: State at least one reason why a scuba instructor is necessary.Name three techniques used by an effective scuba instructor.


Talking is not teaching

Talking is Not Teaching


What is teaching

What is Teaching?

TEACH v. taught (tôt), teach·ing, teach·es

1. To impart knowledge or skills: informed divers are safe divers.

2. To provide knowledge of and instruct in: guide students through the learning process of scuba diving.

3. To condition to a certain action or frame of mind: teaching scuba divers to be self-reliant.

4. To cause to learn by example or experience: people learn by doing.

5. To advocate or preach: safe diving practices.


Is teaching necessary

Is Teaching Necessary?

  • No... we can learn by trial and error

  • So why would we need an instructor?

    • Efficiency

    • Provide a safe, controlled environment

    • Helps guide the student through the learning process


Elements of teaching

Elements of Teaching

  • Theory

  • Formulas

  • Philosophy

Let’s bring someone up to finish this presentation


Why is this candidate having trouble presenting this lecture

Why is this candidate having trouble presenting this lecture?


Preparation

Preparation


No substitute for being prepared

No Substitute for Being Prepared

  • An inexperienced instructor who is well prepared and organized

  • Will do a better job of helping students learn than the best instructor who is unprepared to teach


Organizing your teaching the first steps

Organizing Your TeachingThe first steps

  • Schedule

  • Outline

  • Lesson Plan


1 schedule

1. Schedule

  • A list of times of departures and arrivals; a timetable:

  • A plan for performing work or achieving an objective, specifying the order and allotted time for each part:


2 outline

2. Outline

  • A general description covering the:

    • main points of a subject

    • key points of the lesson

    • order the topics are presented


3 lesson plan

3. Lesson Plan

  • A period of instruction; a classroom session.

  • Should include:

    • Introduction

    • Presentation or Body

    • Summary


Preparing a lesson

Preparing a Lesson


Tomi pasta

T

O

M

I

P

A

S

T

A

itle

bjective

aterials

ntroduction

resentation

pplication

ummary

est

ssignments

TOMI PASTA

  • Putting a Lesson Together


Elements of executing the plan

Elements ofExecuting the Plan

  • Stay Organized

  • Know the Subject

  • Be Familiar with the Presentation

  • Use Technique

    • Tools of the Trade

  • Practice and Polish


Stay organized

Stay Organized

  • Follow the schedule

  • Follow the outline

  • Review training materials prior to use

  • Check training aids to make sure they work


Knowing the subject

Knowing the Subject

  • Personal Experience

  • Reference Material

  • Formal Training

  • You teach a small part of what you need to know


Be familiar with the presentation

Be Familiar with the Presentation

  • Preview the material

  • Practice run the presentation

  • Be familiar with training aids


Use techniques

Laws of Learning

Readiness

Intensity

Primacy

Exercise

Effect

Recency

Use Techniques


Use techniques1

Simple to Complex

Known to Unknown

Kiss Principle

Enthusiasm is Contagious

People learn from positive feedback

Use Techniques


Tools of the trade

Voice

Three P’s

pitch, pace and pause

The uhm’s, ah’s, and ok’s

Grammar: Use it correctly

Profanity: Don’t use it at all

Slang & Technical terms

Communicate so people get it!

Tools of the Trade


Tools of the trade1

Hands

Gestures

Objects of distraction

Pens, pointers, keys

Arms folded or hands in pockets

Tools of the Trade


Tools of the trade2

Eye Contact

Body Language (video)

posture

pacing

Sitting

Teaching Notes

trigger words

time keeping

Tools of the Trade


Tools of the trade3

Training Aids

What is the purpose of training aids?

Training Aids should enhance the presentation

They help to make learning easier

If used properly they can make a good presentation GREAT!

Tools of the Trade

  • If not used correctly…


Underwater instructors certification course

Training Aids Can Make or Break a Presentation

UICC

Candidate


Practice and polish

Practice and Polish

  • Law of Exercise

    • The more we do something, the better we do it

  • How you dress for a presentation

  • Friendly & Enthusiastic

  • Use analogies that people understand


Underwater instructors certification course

  • Talking is Not Teaching

  • Listening is Not Learning

  • And the difference is…

  • YOU the Instructor


Testing the objectives

Testing the objectives

  • List one reason a scuba instructor is needed?

  • Name three techniques that can help make you an effective scuba instructor?


Underwater instructors certification course1

Underwater Instructors Certification Course

Los Angeles County

Teaching Theory and Methods

Questions


Underwater instructors certification course2

Underwater Instructors Certification Course

Los Angeles County

Confined WaterTeaching


Talking is not teaching1

Talking is Not Teaching


What is the difference between classroom and pool sessions

What is the difference between Classroom and Pool Sessions?

  • Classroom sessions are lessons with almost all lecture.

  • Pool sessions are also lessons, but with almost all activity.

  • If students are idle for more than a few minutes…

    Something is wrong


What is a new instructor s strength

What is a new instructor’s strength?

  • A new instructor may lack teaching experience

  • So what tools can they pull from the box?

    • Watermanship

    • The ability to demonstrate

    • Organization


Structure of a pool session

Structure of a Pool Session

  • Briefing

  • Skill Introduction

  • Skill Practice and Evaluation

  • Skill Review and Transition

  • Debriefing


Briefing

Briefing

  • Short, concise and written down

    • Underwater Slate


Introduction of the skill

Introduction of the Skill

  • Importance

  • Objective

  • General Sequence

  • KISS


Skill practice and evaluation

Skill Practice and Evaluation

  • Organized

  • Clear accurate demonstration

  • Effective use of time

  • Adequate student participation

  • Skill evaluation and improvement


Skill review and transition

Skill Review and Transition

  • Evaluation of the students performance communicated

  • Key point reviewed

  • Praise for good performance

    • Praise loudly and correct softly

  • Debriefing


Organize and control

Organize and Control

  • What are the most important things when teaching a pool session?

  • Get them ready for the ocean

  • Safety


Controlling the group

Controlling the Group

  • Use clear concise instructions

  • Key phrases for important actions

  • Use assistants


Use the pool layout

Use the Pool Layout

  • On the deck put the instructor between the pool and the students

  • Have the students work in buddy pairs

  • Formations

    • Shallow end

    • Deep end


Moving the group

Moving the Group

  • Donning and removing equipment

    • Buddy teams

    • Equipment check

  • Entries and exits

  • From the shallow end to the deep end


During the skill demonstrations

During the Skill Demonstrations

  • Are the students:

    • Safe

    • Comfortable

  • Can they see?

  • Are they having fun?


Final notes for confined water

Final Notes for Confined Water

  • Less talking more doing

  • Demonstrate and let the students practice

  • Are they comfortable and can you see their eyes?

  • Remember, scuba diving is fun!


Underwater instructors certification course3

Underwater Instructors Certification Course

Los Angeles County

Confined WaterTeaching

Questions


Elements of grading

Elements of Grading

  • Score

  • Criteria

    • Classroom

    • Confined Water

    • Openwater

  • Elements of your scores


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance

  • Reasonable

  • Understandable

  • Measurable

  • Behavior oriented

  • Agreed upon


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued

Scoring system

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued1

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria

    • Introduction

      • [4] Was an attention-gaining step used?

      • [3] Was the importance or value of the presentation well established?

      • [3] Was what students should be able to do at the end of the lesson and how well they should be able to do it (objectives) presented?

      • [3] Were the main points of the lesson outlined?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued2

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria (continued)

    • Body

      • [3] Was the lesson organized and did it follow a logical progression?

      • [3] Was the information presented safe and correct?

      • [3] Were training aids used effectively?

      • [3] Did the instructor involve the students in the lesson, hold their attention, and control the class?

      • [3] Was the estimated time of the lesson used effectively to reach the learning objectives?

      • [4] Was the topic presented enthusiastically?

      • [4] Was continuing education promoted?

      • [4] Was all terminology completely correct?

      • [5] Was the presentation innovative?

      • [5] Was the presentation polished and professional?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued3

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria (continued)

    • Summary

      • [3] Was there a review of the main points of the lesson?

      • [3] Were the key points of the lesson emphasized?

      • [4] Were the learning objectives tested?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued4

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria

    • Skill introduction

      • [3] Was the importance or value established?

      • [3] Was a statement of student performance objectives made?

      • [3] Was the general sequence of the activity provided?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued5

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria (continued)

    • Skill Practice and Evaluation

      • [3] Was the exercise organized, safe, and controlled?

      • [3] Was there a clear and accurate demonstration?

      • [3] Was practice time efficient and observed?

      • [3] Were skill deficiencies and errors identified and prescriptive coaching and remedial practice provided for?

      • [3] Was there adequate student participation vs. passive listening or watching?

      • [4] Was good use made of assistant(s)?

      • [4] Was the exercise conducted enthusiastically?

      • [4] Were appropriate games used effectively?

      • [5] Was the presentation imaginative and innovative?

      • [5] Was the exercise polished, smooth, and professional?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued6

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria (continued)

    • Skill Transition

      • [3] Were evaluations of student performance communicated to students?

      • [3] Were key points identified?

      • [4] Was good performance praised?

      • [5] Were suggestions for practice and improvement made?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued7

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Open water teaching presentation criteria

    • Briefing

      • [3] Was a statement of training objectives provided?

      • [3] Were clear, concise instructions and a general sequence of activity provided?

      • [3] Were safety precautions and signals covered


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued8

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Open water teaching presentation criteria (continued)

    • Activity

      • [3] Was the activity organized, safe, and controlled?

      • [3] Were NAUI standards met?

      • [3] Was the activity time efficient and observed?

      • [3] Were skill deficiencies and errors identified, corrected, and remedial practice provided for?

      • [3] Were communications effective?

      • [4] Was good use made of assistants?

      • [4] Was the dive enjoyable?

      • [5] Was the conduct of the activity smooth and professional?


Evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued9

Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)

  • Open water teaching presentation criteria (continued)

    • Debriefing

      • [3] Was the debriefing organized and effective?

      • [3] Were evaluations of student performance communicated to students?

      • [3] Were the key points identified?

      • [3] Was good performance praised?

      • [3] Were problems identified and suggestions for practice and improvement made?

      • [4] Was there enthusiasm throughout the presentation?


Conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses

Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses

  • Review elements

    • Score

    • Survey

    • Suggestions to improve


Conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses continued

Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses (continued)

  • Survey

    • Mechanics

    • Substance

    • Style


Conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses continued1

Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses (continued)

  • Suggestions to improve

  • Additional Methods of Critique

    • Training Team

    • Training Team with Staff

    • Audio and/or video recording


Instructor growth and privileges

Instructor Growth and Privileges


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