Exploring family management of childhood brain tumor survivors
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Exploring Family Management of Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors. Janet A. Deatrick, PhD, FAAN University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Associate Professor and Associate Director Center for Health Disparities Research. Research Team. Wendy Hobbie, MSN, CRNP – CHOP PI Susan Ogle, MSN, CRNP

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Exploring family management of childhood brain tumor survivors

Exploring Family Management of Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors

Janet A. Deatrick, PhD, FAAN

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Associate Professor and Associate Director

Center for Health Disparities Research


Research team
Research Team Survivors

  • Wendy Hobbie, MSN, CRNP – CHOP PI

  • Susan Ogle, MSN, CRNP

  • Jill Ginsberg, MD

  • Michael Fisher, MD

  • Erin K. Mullaney, MSN, CRNP

  • Kim Mooney-Doyle, MSN, CRNP


Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements Survivors

  • The families who participated

  • Oncology Nursing Society and the American Brain Tumor Foundation

  • National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

    • R01 NR08048 (Knafl)

    • R01 NR00965 (Deatrick & Hobbie)


Goals
Goals Survivors

  • Short term:

    What does family management mean to parents of adolescent and young adults who survived brain tumors?

  • Long-term: Derive a theoretical base for understanding families of childhood brain tumor survivors


What theoretical conceptual models currently exist to understand these families
What Theoretical/Conceptual Models Currently Exist To Understand These Families?

  • Family stress and coping

  • Role theory

  • Family adaptation and family hardiness

  • Systems theories

  • Substantive theories developed via qualitative methods


What measures currently exist to study these families
What Measures Currently Exist To Study These Families? Understand These Families?

Well established instruments exist consistent with these conceptual/ theoretical frameworks, measuring:

  • General family processes

  • Disease specific family management-asthma, cystic fibrosis, and diabetes


The family management measure f a mm can help us understand these families
The Family Management Measure (F Understand These Families?aMM) Can Help us Understand These Families

  • The FaMM tells us about

    • The integration of the “condition” in everyday life

    • Families’ efforts to manage childhood illness & incorporate illness management into family life

    • Family life in the context of chronic illness

  • The FaMM

    • Complements research on family/individual functioning


nursing.unc.edu/research/ Understand These Families?famm/


Families management clusters
Families Management “Clusters” Understand These Families?


Methods
Methods Understand These Families?

Cognitive interviews

(see: Knafl, Deatrick, Gallo, Holcombe, Bakitas, Dixon, & Grey, 2007)

  • Interviewed 22 parents

  • Discovered what family management means to them

    Case studies

  • Selected 2 families with contrasting family management to illustrate research and clinical potential of family management


Parent sample for cognitive interviews n 22
Parent Sample for Cognitive Interviews Understand These Families?(n=22)

  • Respondents:

    • Mothers: 77% (17/22)

    • Fathers: 23% (5/22)

  • Demographics:

    • Married: 86% (19/22)

    • Biological parent of survivor: 100% (22/22)

    • Age 31-50 years: 55% (12/22)

    • Caucasian: 82% (18/22); African American: 14% (3/22); Asian: 5% (1/22)

    • Employed FT: 64% (14/22)

    • College educated: 45% (10/22)

  • Parent with serious illness:

    • Mothers: 23% (5/22)

    • Fathers: 0% (0/22)


Survivor sample for cognitive interviews n 22
Survivor Sample for Cognitive Interviews Understand These Families?(n=22)

  • Male: 73% (16/22)

  • Female: 27% (6/22)

  • Mean age:19.3 years

  • School:

    • Grade school: 23% (5/22)

    • High school: 9% (2/22)

    • Post-high school: 64% (14/22)

  • Parental rating of survivor health status:

    • Good or excellent: 91% (20/22)

  • Presence of additional chronic illness: 91% (20/22)


Additional finding
Additional Finding Understand These Families?

  • Carefully framing empirical method, research questions, and measures to include ideas of participants

    • Included measures of Life Threat in current research

  • Modified directions for the FaMM

    • Acknowledged the importance of their effort during diagnosis and treatment, but stress the importance of reporting their present effort for this instrument



Two survivors
Two Survivors Understand These Families?

  • AZ, a 22 year old female

  • Diagnosis:

  • Hypothalamic astrocytoma at age 14 years.

  • Treatment consisted of surgery, chemo, & radiation

  • Complications during therapy

  • Off-therapy issues

  • TL, a 23 year old male

  • Diagnosis: medulloblastoma at age 8 years.

  • Treatment: surgery chemo & radiation

  • Complications during therapy

  • Off-therapy issues


Two families
Two Families Understand These Families?

  • Mr. & Mrs. L

    • Caucasian

    • Spousal roles & different coping styles

    • No chronic /acute illnesses in family

    • Siblings

    • Cancer experience in family

    • Role of the survivor in family

    • Caregiver’s struggles

  • Mr. & Mrs. Z

    • Hispanic

    • Spousal roles & different coping styles

    • Mom is a diabetic: no other issues

    • Siblings

    • Cancer experience in family

    • Role of survivor in family

    • Caregiver’s struggles


Compare and contrast their stories
Compare and Contrast their Stories Understand These Families?

  • Survivor’s Daily Life

  • View of Condition Impact

  • Family Life Difficulty

  • Condition Management Effort

  • Condition Management Ability

  • Parental Mutuality


Family management tim s family
Family Management - Tim’s Family Understand These Families?

  • Survivor’s Daily Life: even though Tim’s “normal” has changed nothing of any consequence is different for him; there are things he can’t do but he compensates and does other things

  • :View of Condition Impact: his cancer is no longer the focus of family life, it used to be the first thing that we thought about every day

  • Family Life Difficulty: his cancer doesn’t get in the way of our relationships; however as he attempts to assert his independence we struggle like any other family.


Tim s story continues
Tim’s Story Continues Understand These Families?

  • Condition Management Effort: it doesn’t take as much time as active treatment, but, there are still scary times; last year he got encephalitis and it was a reminder of how fragile his life still is…a week or so later he returned to college—that was hard but the right thing to do

  • Condition Management Ability: the doctors and nurses know what is best about some things but we understand what he has been through and have ideas about how to best help him

  • Parental Mutuality: we are pretty much in sync although I am more protective then his father; we are able to set aside our differences when he has a problem


Family management allison s family
Family Management-Allison’s Family Understand These Families?

  • Survivor’s Daily Life: her normal has changed since she had the brain tumor in ways that are consequential for her and for us; for instance, she is 21 years old and doesn’t go out with friends and doesn’t have a boyfriend

  • View of Condition Impact: a day doesn’t go by that Allison’s cancer isn’t a top concern to us in terms of worrying about late effects or waiting for the cancer to recur

  • Family Life Difficulty: Allison’s cancer has put a strain on family relationships; it is scary for me as her mother and a lot of responsibility that takes me away from care of my other children


Allison s story continues
Allison’s Story Continues Understand These Families?

  • Condition Management Effort: Allison’s disabilities create a lot of work and we feel like we are on a rollercoaster

  • Condition Management Ability: I want to help her become more independent but don’t know how to do so; I feel that everything falls back on me to do and I wish Allison could do more for herself

  • Parental Mutuality: my husband and I don’t agree on the seriousness of Allison’s situation; I feel that my husband doesn’t listen to my concerns and my husband feels that I worry too much about her



Discussion practice and research implications
Discussion: Practice and Research Implications Understand These Families?

Condition management effort and condition management ability are clearly important

Parents of children with chronic conditions

  • Recent FaMM study (R01 NR08048 (Knafl)

    Parents of brain tumor survivors

  • This study (Oncology Nursing Society and the American Brain Tumor Foundation Deatrick & Hobbie])

  • Current study (National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR); R01 NR00965 [Deatrick & Hobbie])


Visit our www site

Visit our WWW site Understand These Families?

http://caregiverproject.securespsites.com/


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