Seating chart period 2
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 32

Seating Chart (Period 2) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 86 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Seating Chart (Period 2). SEATING CHART (Period 5). Opening: Bell Work. Four Corners Game How to play: Read the question Decide on an answer Move to the corner that you think is the answer. Question 12.

Download Presentation

Seating Chart (Period 2)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Seating chart period 2

Seating Chart (Period 2)


Seating chart period 5

SEATING CHART(Period 5)


Opening bell work

Opening: Bell Work

  • Four Corners Game

  • How to play:

  • Read the question

  • Decide on an answer

  • Move to the corner that you think is the answer


Question 12

Question 12

  • (D) “much closer” describes “must study,” which is a verb phrase. We must use adverbs to describe verb phrases.

  • “much closer” should be “much more closely.”


Question 13

Question 13

  • (B) This violates the parallel construction rule. “has been” is a verb phrase. The “and” should connect it to another verb phrase. However, “her popularity” is a noun phrase.

    It should read something like this:

    “Because Deborah has been a representative for over 20 years and has been popular among her constituents . . . .”


Question 14

Question 14

  • (D) This is a word choice error. “respectfully” is a way to describe someone’s actions.

    “respectively” means “the first goes with the first; the second with the second, etc.”


Question 15

Question 15

  • (D) We have a verb tense agreement violation here.

    The sentence starts out in present tense with “bears show.”

    “would have considered” is past tense

    It should read something like:

    “ . . . from anyone whom they consider to be a threat.”


Question 16

Question 16

16. (E) No error


Question 17

Question 17

  • (C) We have a number agreement error here. “the fund deficit” and “the disillusionment” add up to two things.

    “a problem” (one; singular) should be “problems” (two or more; plural)


Question 18

Question 18

  • (B) We have a subject-verb agreement error here.

    “either . . . or” means that only one is possible.

    “were” (plural; two or more) should be “was” (singular; one)


Question 19

Question 19

  • (C) Nouns are divided into two “amount” categories:

    count nouns are things that can be counted. These nouns use the adjective “fewer.” We can pluralize these nouns. Example: After the storm there were seven fewer trees in the park.

    Non-count nouns are things that aren’t counted. These nouns use the adjective “less.” We don’t pluralize these nouns. Example: I’m on a diet, so give me less rice on this plate.

    “defense attorneys” is a count noun, so “less” should be “fewer.”


Question 20

Question 20

  • (B) Parallel construction error here. The speaker is comparing the service at certain restaurants.

    This should read something like:

    “The service at Centro is much better than the service at the other restaurants we frequent . . . .”


Question 21

Question 21

  • (A) Very technical error here, relating to verb tense.

    “rose” should be “had risen”

    (I don’t know how many people will call you on this, though)


Question 22

Question 22

  • (C) Number agreement error.

    “child” is one (singular); “they” is two or more (plural)

    “they” should be “he or she”


Question 23

Question 23

  • (C) Parallel construction error

    “because of” should be “by.”


Question 24

Question 24

24. (E) Although this sentence could use some restructuring, there’s nothing technically wrong with it . . . I think.


Question 25

Question 25

  • (B) Number agreement

    “The Senator and his opponent” is plural (two or more); “he” is singular (one).

    It is unclear which man—if the Senator is also male—made the racially insensitive comment


Question 26

Question 26

  • (C) Verb tense agreement error

    “were observing” is past tense; “are” is present tense

    “are” should be “were”


Question 27

Question 27

  • (C) I think this is a word choice error.

    “advocate” means to support; to defend; to take a stand for something that others may oppose.

    There is no reason to believe that there’s something wrong about testing for abestos.

    This should be something like:

    “. . . Testing . . . is widely recommended for . . . .”


Question 28

Question 28

  • (A) pronoun case error

    Since “between” is a preposition, we must use the pronoun “me,” the objective case for first person singular pronoun


Question 29

Question 29

  • (C) “duo” is treated as a singular noun, so

    “their” (plural) should be “its” (singular)


Agenda august 31 2010

AgendaAugust 31, 2010

  • Objective: We will be able to…

    • Revise our personal narratives

  • Opening: Bell Work

    • SAT prep questions

  • Revision Activity

  • Closing: Exit Pass

    • Explain the changes you have made or will make to your 2nd draft.


Revision activity

Revision Activity

Note:

You will need your handout,

“Why I Have To Take U.S. History Again”

by Tal Vigderson

You will also need your

personal narrative 2nd draft


Seating chart period 2

Directions:

Pass your personal narrative to the left.


Seating chart period 2

Directions:

Pass your personal narrative to the left.


Introduction

Introduction

  • Paragraph 1 of “Why I have To Take U.S. History Again” is the story’s introduction

  • Read the introduction of your partner’s personal narrative.

  • Ask yourself:

    • Is it captivating?

    • Does it catch your attention?

    • Does it make you want to read on?

    • Does it have a thesis statement?

  • Make comments about what you liked or didn’t like and any improvements this person needs to make to his or her introduction


Background information

Background Information

  • Paragraphs 2-4 of “Why I have To Take U.S. History Again” gives the reader some background information about the event.

  • Read your partner’s personal narrative and see if you can find background information.

  • Ask yourself:

    • Is there anything that I don’t understand?

    • Is there anything that is irrelevant?

    • What details need to to be elaborated on?

  • Make comments about what you liked or didn’t like and any improvements this person needs to make to his or her background information


Event

Event

  • Paragraphs 5-12 of “Why I have To Take U.S. History Again” explains the actual event

  • Read your partner’s personal narrative and see if you can find “the event.”

  • Ask yourself:

    • Is there anything that I don’t understand?

    • Is there anything that is irrelevant?

    • What details need to to be elaborated on?

    • Did the author use quotes to make the reading more interesting?

  • Make comments about what you liked or didn’t like and any improvements this person needs to make to his or her event section


Moral lesson learned

Moral/Lesson Learned

  • Paragraphs 13-20 of “Why I have To Take U.S. History Again” explains the moral or lesson learned

  • Read your partner’s personal narrative and see if you can find moral or lesson learned.

  • Ask yourself:

    • Is there anything that I don’t understand?

    • Is there anything that is irrelevant?

    • What details need to to be elaborated on?

    • Did the author use quotes to make the reading more interesting?

  • Make comments about what you liked or didn’t like and any improvements this person needs to make to his or her moral or lesson learned


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • Paragraph 21 of “Why I have To Take U.S. History Again” is the conclusion.

  • Read the conclusion to your partner’s personal narrative.

  • Ask yourself:

    • Does this personal narrative feel complete?

    • Does the author express a final thought about the event, moral, or lesson learned?

  • Make comments about what you liked or didn’t like and any improvements this person needs to make to his or her conclusion


Drafting

Drafting

  • Based on what you’ve learned today, make changes to your 2nd draft.

  • Note: use a different colored pen.


Closing exit pass

Closing: Exit Pass

  • Explain the changes you have made and/or will make to your 2nd draft.

    HW (write in your planner): Bring a hard copy of your personal narrative 3rd draft to class on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.

  • typed, double-spaced, size 12 Times New Roman font


  • Login