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Developing a Space-based Architecture for Climate Monitoring. EC-LXII Side Event. WMO Geneva, Switzerland 11 June 2010. Barbara J. Ryan Director, WMO Space Programme. Overview. Evolution of the WMO Global Observing System (GOS) Vision for the GOS in 2025 (WIGOS)

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Developing a space based architecture for climate monitoring
Developing a Space-based Architecture for Climate Monitoring

EC-LXII Side Event

WMO

Geneva, Switzerland

11 June 2010

Barbara J. Ryan

Director,

WMO Space Programme


Overview
Overview

  • Evolution of the WMO Global Observing System (GOS)

  • Vision for the GOS in 2025 (WIGOS)

  • Some key elements in place

  • The Way Forward




Satellite missions in the vision for the gos in 2025
Satellite Missions in the Vision for the GOS in 2025 (GOS)

Heritage

operational

missions

  • GEO: imager, hyperspectral IR sounder, lightning

  • Sun-synchronous: imager, IR/MW sounders

  • Ocean surface topography constellation

  • Radio-Occultation Sounding constellation

  • Ocean Surface Wind constellation

  • Global Precipitation constellation

  • Earth Radiation Budget (incl. GEO)

  • Atmospheric Composition (incl. GEO)

  • Ocean colour and vegetation imaging

  • Dual-angle view IR imagery

  • Synthetic Aperture Radar

  • Land Surface Imaging

  • Space Weather

  • VIS/IR imagers in HEO (e.g. PCW and Arktica)

  • Doppler wind LIDAR, Low-frequency MW

  • GEO MW

  • GEO High-resolution narrow-band imagers

  • Gravimetric sensors

Transition from R&D to operational status

Operational pathfinders and demonstrators


Some key elements in place

Consistent (GOS) Calibrateddata sets

Essential Climate products

Satellite data

Satellites & sensors

Users

GSICS

GOS

SCOPE-CM

Some Key Elements in Place

  • Requirements Gathering and Articulation – GCOS ECVs

  • Inventory of Capabilities – WMO Dossier, CEOS MIM

  • Vision for the Global Observing System (GOS) in 2025

  • CEOS Virtual Constellations

  • Global Space-based Inter-calibration System (GSICS)

  • Sustained Co-Ordinated Processing of Environmental satellite data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM)

  • Quality Assurance Frameworks – QA4EO, WIGOS


Gcos essential climate variables ecvs space based
GCOS Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) (GOS) (Space-based)

  • Terrestrial

  • T.1 Lakes

  • T.2 Glaciers and Ice Caps, and Ice Sheets

  • T.3 Snow Cover

  • T.4 Albedo

  • T.5 Land Cover

  • T.6 fAPAR

  • T.7 LAI

  • T.8 Biomass

  • T.9 Fire Disturbance

  • T.10 Soil Moisture

  • Atmosphere

    A.1 Surface Wind Speed and Direction

    A.2 Upper-air Temperature

    A.3 Water A Vapour

    A.4 Cloud properties

    A.5 Precipitation

    A.6 Earth Radiation Budget

    A.7 Ozone

    A.8 Atmospheric reanalysis (multiple ECVs)

    A.9 Aerosols

    A.10 Carbon Dioxide, Methane and other Greenhouse Gases

    A.11 Upper-air Wind

  • Oceans

  • O.1 Sea Ice

  • O.2 Sea Level

  • O.3 Sea Surface Temperature

  • O.4 Ocean Colour

  • O.5 Sea State

  • O.6 Ocean Reanalysis

  • O.7 Ocean Salinity


For Long-term Observations – Research (GOS) and Operational Satellite Data Must Contribute

Source: NOAA

8


Challenges for operational climate monitoring
Challenges for (GOS) Operational Climate Monitoring

  • Continuity and improvement of operational constellations

  • Sustained observation of ALL Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) observable from space

  • Transition Research to Operations for priority, mature observations


Great advances in global and regional weather forecasts

Source: ECMWF (GOS)

Great Advances in Global and Regional Weather Forecasts


The way forward
The Way Forward (GOS)

www.ceos.org

. . . . both satellite and in situ data are required to better monitor, characterize, and predict changes in the Earth system. While in situ measurements will remain essential and largely measure what cannot be measured from satellites, Earth-observation satellites are the only realistic means to obtain the necessary global coverage, and with well-calibrated measurements will become the single most important contribution to global observations for climate.


Summary
Summary (GOS)

  • Key elements are already in place – must leverage existing efforts and existing coordination mechanisms

  • R&D and operational entities and activities complement each other – both are needed for the Way Forward

  • Challenges (and opportunities)

    • Continuity – missions, networks, measurements

    • Sustained observations are needed

    • Transition and integration elements

  • The Way Forward

    • Implement the Vision for the GOS in 2025

    • Increase coordination and cooperation – recognizing different, but complementary roles and responsibilities

    • Bring the rigor of the existing Weather Constellation of GOS to a Climate Constellation – a Space-based Architecture for Climate Monitoring


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