Survey of the U.S.

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Survey of the U.S.

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7. Survey of the U.S. Originally 13 states – declared independence from Great Britain on July 4, 1776 1783 – Treaty of Paris – Area east of Mississippi from G.B. 1803 – Louisiana Purchase –Land from Mississippi to Rocky Mountains from France ($15 Million purchase) 1819 – Florida from Spain 1845 – Texas annexed from Mexico 1848 – Mexican war – Southwest states annexed 1867 – “Seward’s Folly” – Alaska from Russia for $7.2 Million 1898 - Hawaii

8. Survey of the U.S. Originally 13 states – declared independence from Great Britain in 1776 1783 – Treaty of Paris – Area east of Mississippi from G.B. 1803 – Louisiana Purchase –Land from Mississippi to Rocky Mountains from France ($15 Million purchase) 1819 – Florida from Spain 1845 – Texas annexed from Mexico 1846 – Mexican war – Southwest states annexed 1867 – “Seward’s Folly” – Alaska from Russia for $7.2 Million 1898 - Hawaii

11. A US Map (with ??)

12. Survey of the U.S. US Population Population Clock U.S. Census Bureau http://www.census.gov U.S. 302,752,888 World 6,615,461,103 11:15 GMT (EST+5) Sep 01, 2007

13. Survey of the U.S. US Population

14. Survey of the U.S.

15. Survey of the U.S. Persons under 5 years old, percent, 2004 6.8% Persons under 18 years old, percent, 2004 25.0% Persons 65 years old and over, percent, 2004 12.4% Female persons, percent, 2004 50.8% White persons, not Hispanic, percent, 2004 67.4% Black persons, percent, 2004 (a) 12.8% American Indian and Alaska Native persons, percent, 2004 (a) 1.0% Asian persons, percent, 2004 (a) 4.2% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, percent, 2004 (a) 0.2% Foreign born persons, percent, 2000 11.1%

16. Language other than English spoken at home, 2000 17.9% High school graduates, percent of persons age 25+, 2000 80.4% Bachelor's degree or higher, pct of persons age 25+, 2000 24.4% Average travel time to work, 2000 25.5 minutes Median household income, 2006 $48,201 Persons below poverty level, 2003 12.5% Hourly Wage required for a family of 4 to live above poverty line $13.75/hr. Persons with a disability, age 5+, 2000 49,746,248 http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/00000.html

17. Survey of the U.S. Which country is larger? In population, China is almost 5 times larger. But, in area? Different sources says different things. Both countries want to be known as being larger. So which one is bigger?

18. Survey of the U.S. Which country is larger? According to your Chinese textbook: “The United States consists of 50 states with a total area of about 9.4 million square kilometres which makes it the fourth largest country in the world.” (p. 169)

19. Survey of the U.S. According to http://geography.about.com/library/misc/bllgcountries.htm Countries ranked by Land AREA are: 1 Russia 6.6 million mi2 (17 million km2) 2 Canada 3.9 million mi2 (9.9 million km2) 3 China 3.7 million mi2 (9.6 million km2) 4 United States 3.7 million mi2 (9.1 million km2)

20. Survey of the U.S. But, according to http://www.geographyiq.com/ranking/ranking_area_land_top25.htm Countries ranked by land MASS are: 1. Russia 16,995,800.00 sq km 2. China 9,326,410.00 sq km 3. United States 9,158,960.00 sq km 4. Canada 9,093,507.00 sq km 5. Brazil 8,456,510.00 sq km 6. Australia 7,617,930.00 sq km

21. Survey of the U.S. According to http://geography.about.com/library/misc/bllgcountries.htm 1 Russia 6.6 million mi2 (17 million km2) 2 Canada 3.9 million mi2 (9.9 million km2) 3 China 3.7 million mi2 (9.6 million km2) 4 United States 3.7 million mi2 (9.1 million km2)

22. Survey of the U.S. But according to the U.S. CIA: US (50 states) total: 9,631,418 sq km land: 9,161,923 sq km water: 469,495 sq km China total: 9,596,960 sq km land: 9,326,410 sq km water: 270,550 sq km http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ch.html

23. Survey of the U.S. Who knows? Who cares? It all depends on who is measuring and what you are measuring. The U.S. is the third or fourth largest country in area in the world. Now, taking some average numbers, here are some comparisons:

24. Survey of the U.S. US Land Area - 9.16M sq. kms. Largest State – Alaska -1,593,446 sq. kms. Texas – 692, 247 sq. kms. Smallest State–Rhode Island–3,188 sq kms ?? – 9.6M sq. kms. ?? – 101,800 sq. kms. ?? - 16,596 sq km (Urban: 3,068 sq km)

25. Survey of the U.S. Geography The main geographical features of the United States: Two Large Mountain Ranges: The Appalachians and the Rockies Three Main Rivers: The Mississippi, The Missouri, and The Ohio Five Great Lakes: Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior

26. Survey of the U.S. Geography 1. Atlantic Seacoast and Appalachians New England Mid-Atlantic South 2. Mississippi River Basin Midwest Great Plains 3. Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast Mountain States South-west Pacific Coast

27. Survey of the U.S. Geography The main geographical features of the United States

30. A US Map (with ??)

31. Survey of the U.S. Geography States (and Important Cities) 1. Atlantic Seacoast and Appalachians New England Maine (ME), New Hampshire (NH), Vermont (VT), Massachusetts (MA) (Boston), Rhode Island (RI), Connecticut (CT) Mid-Atlantic New York NY (New York City), New Jersey (NJ), Delaware (DE) Maryland (MD), West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA) (Philadelphia, Pittsburgh), Washington D.C. South Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA) (Atlanta) Florida (FL) (Miami), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX) (Houston, Dallas) Tennessee (TN), Kentucky (KY), Arkansas (AR), Louisiana (LA) (New Orleans)

33. A US Map (with ??)

34. Survey of the U.S. Geography States (and Important Cities) 2. Mississippi River Basin Midwest Ohio (OH)(Cleveland), Michigan (MI)(Detroit) Indiana (IN), Illinois (IL) (Chicago) Wisconsin (WI), Missouri (MO) (St. Louis), Iowa (IA), Minnesota (MN) Great Plains North Dakota (ND), South Dakota (SD), Nebraska (NE) Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK)

36. Survey of the U.S. Geography States (and Important Cities) 3. Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast Mountain States Montana (MT), Wyoming (WY), Idaho (ID), Colorado (CO)(Denver) South-west (Desert) Utah (UT) (Salt Lake City), Nevada (NV) (Las Vegas) Arizona (AZ), New Mexico (NM) Pacific Coast Washington (WA)(Seattle), Oregon (OR) (Portland) California (CA)(Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco) Alaska (AK), Hawaii (HI) (Honolulu)

39. Survey of the U.S. U.S. Industry 6% of land and 5% of people in the world Most highly developed economy 20% of world’s agricultural and industrial production 50% of world’s agricultural exports

40. Survey of the U.S. U.S. Industry North East and Great Lakes area 1/3 of territory 1/2 states 2/3 of population 3/4 of manufacturing and industry

41. Survey of the U.S. U.S. Industry South Almost 1/3 of territory 1/5 of population Rapidly increasing production due to: Geography (warm) Fertile land Water resources Cheaper labor costs

42. Survey of the U.S. U.S. Industry West 2/5 of territory 1/6 of population Aerospace, military, oil, computers and information technology

43. Survey of the U.S. U.S. Belts Steel Belt (Great Lakes) Wheat Belt (Great Plains) Corn Belt (Great Lakes, Plains) Cheese Belt (Great Lakes) Cotton Belt (South) Rust Belt (Great Lakes)

45. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History

46. Survey of the U.S. Africa 50-60,000 years ago – Central Asia 25,000 years ago – cross Bering Strait to North America Dark Hair Red-skin Live in tribes – communal living Good at hand-made arts Hunters and farmers

47. Survey of the U.S.

48. Survey of the U.S. Meanwhile, in Europe…………

49. Survey of the U.S. The Dark Ages - The world is flat The Renaissance (1450-1600) Europe rediscovers its ancient Greek and Roman culture Arts, sciences and literature flourish 1451 – Christopher Columbus born (Italy)

50. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History The Story of Christopher Columbus King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain 1492/08/03 – Journey begins 1492/10/12 – Reaches Bahama Islands 1493-1504 – 3 more trips 1498 – lands in South America 1506 – Columbus dies

51. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History Vespucci – 1499 and 1500 Confirms the land is not Asia Publishes New Atlas of the New World in 1507 Vespucci’s first name? Amerigo America (Latin form of Amerigo)

52. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History Importance of the Discovery of the “New World” East and West branches of humanity meet again in America. People’s horizons are widened Opened up new markets A new start for the middle-class Promoted commerce in sea and industry Rapid development of capitalism

53. Survey of the U.S. Exploration and Colonization of the Americas European powers send many explorers Spain Balboa (Panama) Magellan (1520) sails around the world (killed in Philippines) England John Cabot (1497) (Canada) Francis Drake (1588) (Spanish Armada) John Smith (Massachusetts) - Pocahontas

54. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History France Cartier (1534) – St. Lawrence River Champlain – (1603) - Quebec

56. Survey of the U.S. European Colonization of America Spain Central America South America Florida, Texas France Eastern Canada St. Lawrence River Great Lakes Mississippi River England Eastern U.S. Portugal Brazil

58. Survey of the U.S. U.S. History Results of Exploration and Colonization 2 continents discovered Better idea of the size of the earth Foundation for new countries New resources discovered Large areas of land colonized by European kings

59. Survey of the U.S. England’s 13 Colonies Land claimed by kings, belonged to people who settled there: Settlers Pioneers Colonists Chartered companies

60. Survey of the U.S. The 13 Colonies 1607 – first English settlement Jamestown, Virginia Named after King James (I) Founded by a Charter company

61. Survey of the U.S. The 13 Colonies 1620 – Mayflower Puritans from Plymouth, England 110 people - 66 Pilgrims – 44 Others November, 1620 – Plymouth Rock 50 died the first winter Indians March, 1621 Samoset and Squanto October, 1621 – First Thanksgiving

62. Survey of the U.S. Thanksgiving Day October, 1621 1622 – Bad harvest, no Thanksgiving 1623 – Second Thanksgiving 1676 – Thanksgiving Day proclaimed On June 20, 1676, the governing council of Charlestown, Massachusetts, held a meeting to determine how best to express thanks for the good fortune that had seen their community securely established. By unanimous vote they instructed Edward Rawson, the clerk, to proclaim June 29 as a day of thanksgiving.

63. 1676 – Thanksgiving Day proclaimed by Edward Rawson

64.

65.

66. Survey of the U.S. The Early to Mid-1700’s Life in general - DIY Abundant wood Abundant food Hard work Large families Marry young Simple education – “The Three Rs” = “reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmatic” Religious Privacy

67. Survey of the U.S. The Mid-1700’s Government King selected a governor for each colony King chose a council for each town People elected representatives to advise

68. Survey of the U.S. The Mid-1700’s 1756-1763 French-Indian War War between France and England (Different Indian groups supported both sides)

70. Survey of the U.S. The Mid-1700’s 1756-1763 French-Indian War England wins and gains control of Canada and Mississippi River valley

72. Survey of the U.S. The Mid-1700’s 1760 – King George III becomes King of England

73. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 Colonies grow in area, wealth and population Depend less and less on England for food, clothes and protection Able to grow and produce everything they need Many came to America to get away from England (laws, class system, religious freedom) England is in debt due to French-Indian War (called the Seven Year War in Europe) SO……………

74. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 England begins to exercise stricter control over colonies Moves 10,000 man army to America Close frontier to further settlement Raw materials taken out to support England All exports MUST pass through England first All imports must pass through England first and be shipped to America on English boats All imports heavily taxed

75. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 1772 – Committee of Correspondence 1773 – Tea Act East India Tea Company had a great deal of excess tea so they were exempt from Tea Duty Boston Tea Party (December 16, 1773) King closes Boston Port and deprives Massachusetts of self-government

76. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 1765 – Stamp Act All legal documents and other papers are required to be stamped Colonialists declare “No taxation without representation” Repealed by Parliament in 1766 1767 – Townsend Acts Duty (tax) imposed on ALL imported goods Colonies boycott imported goods

77. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 1770 Boston Massacre – British soldiers kill 5 men, many wounded Townsend Acts repealed EXCEPT for tea 1772 – Committee of Correspondence 1773 – Tea Act

81. Survey of the U.S. 1763-1776 1774 – First Continental Congress in Philadelphia Unites all leading men from all colonies Agrees no Imports or Exports to England 1775 – Massachusetts prepares for war Forms own militia – the Minutemen Patrick Henry: “Give me liberty or give me Death!” April 19, 1775 – small battle in Lexington May, 1775 – Second Continental Congress (Phil.) George Washington chosen Commander of Continental Army June 17, 1775 – Battle of Bunker Hill – first British defeat July 4th, 1776 – Declaration of Independence “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness”

82. Survey of the U.S. July 4th, 1776 – Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776 The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

83. Survey of the U.S. July 4th, 1776 – Declaration of Independence We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. --That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. … The history of the present King of Great Britain [George III] is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

84. Survey of the U.S. July 4th, 1776 – Declaration of Independence We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by the Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

85. Survey of the U.S. July 4th, 1776 – Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776 The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. --That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. —Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain [George III] is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers. He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the consent of our legislatures. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences: For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by the Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

86. Survey of the U.S. 1776 – 1783 War of Independence (1776-1781) (pp.239-258) Summer 1776 – 30,000 redcoats @NYC Washington crosses Delaware – loses 15,000 Battle of Trenton – Christmas night 1780 - Benedict Arnold (West Point traitor)

87. Survey of the U.S. 1776 – 1783 Benjamin Franklin persuades French to help October, 1781 British Army, led by General Cornwallis, is surrounded at Yorktown, Virginia and blocked from escape to sea by French navy. Cornwallis surrenders. British leave America. September 3, 1783 – Treaty of Paris 13 colonies granted sovereignty U.S. gets territory from Canada to Florida and west to the Mississippi River

88. Survey of the U.S. 1776 – 1783 Significance of American Revolution A new republic is created Good triumphs over evil Encourages liberation of people all over the world

89. Survey of the U.S. Form of Government Constitutional Democracy American Constitution (pp.408-426) 1783-1789 Confederation of States Each state governed independently Weak central government Articles of Confederation 1787 – Constitutional Convention Need for stronger central government Disputes between larger and smaller states Federalists (John Adams) vs. States Rights (Thomas Jefferson) September 17, 1787 – U.S. Constitution 1788 Ratified by all the states

90. Survey of the U.S. American Constitution (pp.408-426) April 30,1789 – George Washington becomes first U.S. President. NYC is first capital of U.S. Congress – 2 Houses Senate – 2 members from each state House of Representatives – number based on population Supreme Court 1791 - First 10 amendments to Constitution

91. Survey of the U.S. American Constitution (pp.408-426) 1791 - First 10 amendments to Constitution – “Bill of Rights” Freedom of Speech Right to Assemble Right to bear arms Right against search and seizure Freedom of the Press

92. Survey of the U.S. Form of Government (pp.172-175/262-265) Three Branches Legislative - U.S. Congress – Senate and House of Reps. Makes laws Executive – President, Cabinet, Departments & Agencies Carries out (executes) laws Judicial - Supreme Court Upholds Constitution Enforces laws

93. Survey of the U.S. Form of Government (pp.207-308) Legislative Branch U.S. Congress – Senate and House of Reps. Makes laws 2 Houses Senate – 100 members 2 members from each state House of Representatives – 435 seats House Districts based on equal population There are currently 70 women serving in the U.S. House of Representatives and 14 in the U.S. Senate.

94. Survey of the U.S. Currently (2007/07) Senate - 100 members (2 from each state) 55 Republicans 44 Democrats 1 Independent Serve for 6 years – 1/3 elected every 2 years

95. Survey of the U.S. House of Representatives: 435 Representatives 232 Republicans 202 Democrats 1 Independent 1 Vacancies Serve for two years – District elections every 2 years 7 States have only 1 Representative: Alaska, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Vermont and Delaware only have 1 Representative.

96. Survey of the U.S. Executive Branch President, Cabinet, Departments & Agencies Carries out (executes) laws Presidential election every 4 years Cabinet – Secretaries appointed by President State Defense Interior Commerce Education (little power – each state can regulate education) Etc. Agencies State: Embassies and Consulates Defense: Army, Navy, Air Force

97. Survey of the U.S. Form of Government (pp.207-308) Judicial Branch Supreme Court Upholds Constitution Enforces laws 9 Justices – appointed by President and confirmed by Senate Serve for life

98. Merry Christmas

99. Merry Christmas

100. Survey of the U.S. The War of 1812 1789 Treaty of Paris – U.S. territory from Atlantic Ocean to Mississippi River U.S. settlers expanded westward British had hopes of winning back the U.S. England encouraged Indians to attack settlers June, 1812 U.S. declares war v. British

101. Survey of the U.S. The War of 1812 Sea War – Brits win on East Coast 1814 – Washington D.C. captured and White House burned down 1814 – Fort McHenry bombarded all night by Brits; U.S. holds the fort U.S. National Anthem – “The Star-Spangled Banner”

102. Survey of the U.S. U.S. National Anthem The Star Spangled Banner O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave

103. Survey of the U.S. The War of 1812 Ground War – U.S. defeats Brits and Indians in west Treaty of Ghent – rids U.S. of Brits at last December 24, 1814 From 1814 – 1861 U.S. grows rapidly Monroe Doctrine

104. Survey of the U.S. The Civil War (1861-1865) Causes: North vs. Southern States economies North – industrial South - agricultural Slavery Slave trade by Brits beginning in 1619 Northerners opposed – Abolitionists (to abolish) 1850’s – Underground Railroad Abraham Lincoln elected President in 1861 CSA attacks USA Fort Sumter - 1861

105. Survey of the U.S. The Civil War (1861-1865) 11 of 34 States “secede” from the U.S.A. South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Tennessee, Louisiana, Texas, N. Carolina, Arkansas, Virginia “Confederate States of America” (CSA) CSA attacks USA Fort Sumter – 1861

106. Survey of the U.S. The Civil War (1861-1865) Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation Frees all slaves and abolishes slavery 1865 – War ends 13th Amendment to the Constitution abolishes slavery 14th Equal rights for all citizens regardless of race

107.

108. Survey of the U.S.

109. Survey of the U.K. Resources for this class can be found at my website: http://chake.chinatefl.com/class/

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