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Outrage. Disappointment. Pity. Anger. Apathy. Disengaged pupils – social difficulties. Look out for: work that is seldom completed; irregular attendees at risk of being excluded; extremely self-defensive behaviour. Disengaged pupils - hidden illness. Look out for:

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Outrage

Disappointment

Pity

Anger

Apathy


Disengaged pupils social difficulties
Disengaged pupils – social difficulties

Look out for:

  • work that is seldom completed;

  • irregular attendees at risk of being excluded;

  • extremely self-defensive behaviour.


Disengaged pupils hidden illness
Disengaged pupils - hidden illness

Look out for:

  • sudden reduction in quality of work;

  • withdrawn and solitary behaviour;

  • incomplete work;

  • lethargy and lack of energy;

  • irregular attendance.


Multiple exceptionality and underachievement

Dysfluency

Stuttering and non-flowing speech

Dysfluency

Difficulty with processing language.

Dysgraphia

Difficulty with handwriting.

Dysgraphia

Difficulty with spelling.

Dysorthographia

Difficulty with spelling.

Dysorthographia

Difficulty with numbers.

Dyslexia

Difficulty with processing language.

Dyslexia

Difficulty with handwriting.

Aphasia

Problems with expressive and/or receptive language

Aphasia

Dyscalculia

Accurate mechanical reading beyond what is understood

Difficulty with numbers.

Dyscalculia

Dyspraxia

Difficulty with spatial concerns and non-verbal problems.

Difficulty with spatial concerns and non-verbal problems.

Dyspraxia

Hyperlexia

Stuttering and non-flowing speech

Accurate mechanical reading beyond what is understood

Hyperlexia

Problems with expressive and/or receptive language

Multiple exceptionality and underachievement


Butterfly learners may have ad hd
‘Butterfly learners’ – may have AD/HD

Look out for students who:

  • prefer active learning;

  • apparently lack sustained concentration, but have a good awareness of information;

  • are often at the root of jokes and good-humoured mischief;

  • create complex 'stories' to take convoluted routes around the school/classroom to avoid having to sit still.


High ability and autism/Asperger Syndrome

Max has one of the most common conditions that teachers of able students in ordinary schools are likely to encounter: high functioning autism, or Asperger Syndrome. His teachers found out as much as possible from his parents to try and understand his moods, and to know his interests and preferences, in order to engage him in learning.

Max needs clarity and unambiguous instructions and he responds well to routine and predictability. His strengths include mathematics and science and teachers do their best to nurture these propensities, grouping him with older students who are of similar ability and who shared his interests (by Year 7 he was fascinated by chaos theory).

Simultaneously, the school has tried to provide support in areas that he finds more challenging such as physical education and tasks that require more imaginative responses, like drama. Max's social development is being helped through participating in group tasks with clearly defined roles. Teachers learnt that breaking down Max's rigid responses needed to be done slowly through introducing change gently and in a controlled way.


  • verbal fluency and an excellent memory;

  • fascination with letters and/or numbers;

  • having an absorbing interest in a specific topic and memorising vast quantities of information;

  • annoying peers with limitless talk about own interests;

  • asking awkward questions and giving lengthy discourses in answer to questions;

  • hypersensitivity to sensory stimulation and refusal to eat or wear certain things;

  • dyssynchronicity in abilities, with extraordinary skill in some areas and average ability in others.


What can we do
What can we do?

  • Increase challenge;

  • Support pupils with problems;

  • Consider styles of thinking;

  • Recognise language differences;

  • Ensure school ethos and values encompass diversity.