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Results-based Management An overview. Results-based Management: An Overview. What is RBM? Why RBM? The Log Frame Indicators. What is results based management?. A management approach aimed at ensuring that activities achieve desired results. Performance monitoring is a critical element

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Results based management an overview1

Results-based Management: An Overview

What is RBM? Why RBM?

The Log Frame

Indicators


What is results based management?

A management approach aimed at ensuring

that activities achieve desired results

Performancemonitoring is a critical element

  • How well are results being achieved

  • What measures are needed to improve the process


Rbm in practice
RBM in practice

What are the 2 main benefits/advantages and

2 limitations/challenges in using RBM?

(1 benefit / challenge per card)

10mn


What is results based management?

A management approach aimed at ensuring

that activities achieve desired results

Performancemonitoring is a critical element

  • How well are results being achieved

  • What measures are needed to improve the process


What is a result
What is a Result ?

A describable or measurable change resulting from a cause and effect relationship

- UNDG agreed RBM terminology


General challenges applying rbm
General Challenges: Applying RBM

  • Difficult to apply causal logic

  • Different definitions

  • Difficult to integrate cross cutting issues

  • Difficult to revise

  • Difficult to measure


Why rbm
Why RBM?

Stated rationale/intended gains:

  • Improved focus / clarity on results instead of activities

  • Improved transparency & accountability

  • Improved monitoring of programme achievements


Common elements of rbm
Common elements of RBM

  • Use of causality and causal (if…then) logic and problem analysis

  • Structuring of programmes/projects around a hierarchy of desired results

  • Use of change language

  • Costing of results (RBB) rather than isolated activity budgeting

  • Regular monitoring & performance evaluation against planned results with use of indicators


  • MD/MDGs/

  • International norms

  • Major Challenge

  • UNCT Comparative Advantage

  • Alignment of key actors to support UNCT action

  • 2

  • 1

  • 3

  • 4

  • Top strategic priority

  • Potential high priority: use negotiation/consensus building to seek alignment

  • Potential high priority: draw on regional/global UN capacity where feasible

    4. Lower priority: does not meet major challenge


Terminology exercise
Terminology Exercise

  • Match the RBM terms with their definitions.

  • See if there’s any logical hierarchy

    (per table, 10mn)


Terminology
Terminology

  • Results: Changes in a state / condition which derive from a cause and effect relationship

  • Impact: Positive and negative long term effects on identifiable population groups produced by a peacebuilding / development intervention

  • Outcome: The intended or achieved short-term and medium-term effects of an intervention’s outputs, usually requiring the collective effort of partners.


Terminology cont
Terminology cont.

  • Outputs: The products and services which result from the completion of activities within a development intervention.

  • Activities: Actions taken or work performed through which inputs, such as funds, technical assistance and other types of resources are mobilised to produce specific outputs.

  • Inputs:The financial, human, material, technological and information resources used for the development intervention.


A typology for rbm poverty reduction 2
A Typology for RBM: Poverty Reduction (2)

Impact

Human!

5-10 yrs

Outcome

Institutional/ Behavioural

5 yrs

Output

Operational/ skills, abilities, products & services

<5 yrs

Promises

Capacity gaps closed

Activity

<1 yr

Results

Like…

Focus

@

Timeframe

National priorities/ nMDGs

more

Obligations met

then

Poverty reduced

if

then

less

Outcome

Employment and income generation increased

Institutional/ Behavioural

5 yrs

Collective Account-ability

A good bet!

if

Performance improved

then

3000 new small enterprises developed in poorest provinces

Level of

control

if

then

7 model business incubators operational in poorest provinces

less

if

more

  • Acquire facilities

  • Staff training

  • Micro-credit provision..


A typology for rbm poverty reduction 21
A Typology for RBM: Poverty Reduction (2)

Impact

Human!

5-10 yrs

Outcome

Institutional/ Behavioural

5 yrs

Output

Operational/ skills, abilities, products & services

<5 yrs

Activity

<1 yr

Results

Like…

Focus

@

Timeframe

more

then

Poverty reduced

if

then

Outcome

Employment and income generation increased

Institutional/ Behavioural

5 yrs

Collective Account-ability

if

then

3000 new small enterprises developed in poorest provinces

if

then

7 model business incubators operational in poorest provinces

less

if

more

  • Acquire facilities

  • Staff training

  • Micro-credit provision..


The logical framework approach and the logframe
The Logical Framework Approach and the LogFrame

  • Process (LFA) and product (Logframe)

  • Starting point for all current RBM systems

  • Each UN agencies moved to independently modify the Logframe, related definitions and systems to meet their own needs

  • Shows the intended paths we think are required to achieve desired results



Un outcomes typical pitfalls
UN Outcomes: typical pitfalls

  • Wordy (..and no change language)

    To promote equitable economic development and democratic governance in accordance with international norms by strengthening national capacities at all levels and empowering citizens and increasing their participation in decision-making processes

  • Containing multiple results

    The state improves its delivery of services and its protection of rights—with the involvement of civil society and in compliance with its international commitments

  • Wishy-washy, not a result

    Support to institutional capacity building for improved governance


Un outputs typical pitfalls
UN Outputs: typical pitfalls

  • Confusing means and ends

    Train 2,000 police officers by 2010

  • Confusing output and indicator

    Proportion of under-five children accessing preventive health interventions at 50% by 2011

  • Unclear link between output and outcome ( no “if/then”)

  • Unfocused, unrealistic in terms of UN accountability

    Emergency preparedness plans are operationalized at national and district level

    Law is passed




Hrba rbm
HRBA  RBM

Outcomes

A change in the performance of rights holders and duty-bearers

What are RH and DB doing differently?

Outputs

A change in the capacities of RH and DB?

What are the new services, products, authority, responsibility, skills, resources that contribute to performance?


Undaf outcomes

UNDAF Outcomes

In addition to ‘sectoral’ outcomes, the UNDAF can include outcomes that focus explicitly on root causes and / or address horizontal issues:

. By 2013, social cohesion and reconciliation is consolidated

. By 2013, conflict afflicted youth are empowered and effectively participate in the country’s political, economic and social development

. By 2014, sustained community based recovery

. Sustained capacity by government, civil society and private sector to effectively, and collectively design, implement and monitor equitable economic development policies

Can promote greater UN cohesion and intersectoral coordination


Group activity using the set of cards provided develop a results framework
Group ActivityUsing the set of cards provided, develop a results framework…


National Goal: Good Governance and Protection of Human Rights

UNDAF Outcome: By 2010, achieve effective participation of citizens, and government accountability and integratity

- Laws on public demonstration and freedom of association in accordance with IS

  • Strengthened community participation in the planning and implementation of local development activities

  • - Capacity of civil society strengthened through civic education and engagement with Parliament

Agency outcome: Increased participation of civil society and citizens in decision making

Agency outcome: Corruption in government management significantly reduced

  • Advocacy programmes conducted for accession to the UN convention against corruption

  • - Advocacy programmes conduction for the adoption of a national anti-corruption law

  • Government assisted to meet its obligation under the International Covenant on Economic, social and Cultural Rights

  • Capacities of communes for decentralized planning, manangement and delivery of public goods and services further strengthened

Agency outcome: Effectiveness of decentralized government structures improved to deliver basic services



What is an indicator
What is an indicator? Rights

A tool to measure evidence of progress towards a result or that a result has been achieved


Baseline target and achievement
Baseline, Target and Achievement Rights

Performance

Commitment

Achievement

At end of period

Planned

Level of

Achievement

Current

Level of

Achievement

Baseline

Target

Achievement


Indicators baseline target and source of data
Indicators, Baseline, Target and Source of Data Rights

Indicator:

Net enrolment ratio

(M; F)

Baseline: F:45%

Target: F: 75%

- Improvement in school test scores

Outcome:

By 2010, more girls in Belem Province enjoy a quality, basic education

Source of Data

  • MICS (survey)

  • Annual school test scores report

Indicator:

# Teachers with new certification

Baseline: 0

Target: 800

  • Teacher proficiency reports

  • Improvement of school satisfaction ratings

Output:

Teachers in Belem Province can deliver the new curriculum effectively

Source of Data:

  • MECYS EMIS

  • School satisfaction surveys


Performance indicator selection criteria
Performance Indicator Selection Criteria Rights

Validity - Does it measure the result?

Reliability - Is it a consistent measure over time and, if supplied externally, will it continue to be available?

Sensitivity - When a change occurs will it be sensitive to those changes?

Simplicity - Will it be easy to collect and analyze the information?

Utility - Will the information be useful for decision-making and learning?

Affordable – Do we have the resources to collect the information?


Indicators for different levels of results
Indicators for different levels of results Rights

Indicators can be used to measure impacts, outcomes, outputs and also programming processes:

Impact level: the realization of relevant human rights and sustained, positive changes in the life, dignity and wellbeing of individuals and peoples.

Outcome level: legal, policy, institutional and behavioural changes leading to a better performance of rights-holders to claim rights and duty-bearers to meet obligations

Output level: goods, services and deliverables produced to develop the capacities of duty-bearers and rights-holders

Programming processes: measuring ways in which programme processes are participatory, inclusive and transparent, especially for vulnerable groups


How to develop good indicators
How to develop good indicators Rights

…especially from a HRBA perspective

Equality: Do your indicators capture the experience of vulnerable and marginalised groups? Can your indicators be disaggregated?

Ownership: Have RHs and DBs contributed to the development of the indicators? Do they have confidence in the indicators chosen?

Clarity: Are they clear and understandable to all audiences, including vulnerable and marginalised groups?



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