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Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7. Which of these particles has an electrical charge?. A. Proton. Electron. Ion. D. All of the above. Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7. Which of these particles has an electrical charge?. A. Proton. Electron. Ion. All of the above.

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Which of these particles has an electrical charge

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which of these particles has an electrical charge?

A. Proton.

  • Electron.

  • Ion.

    D. All of the above.


Which of these particles has an electrical charge1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which of these particles has an electrical charge?

A. Proton.

  • Electron.

  • Ion.

  • All of the above.

    Explanation:

    An ion, by definition, is a charged atom—one with an extra electron(s) or deficient in one or more electrons.


Which is the predominant carrier of charge in copper wire

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which is the predominant carrier of charge in copper wire?

A. Proton.

  • Electron.

  • Ion.

    D. All of the above.


Which is the predominant carrier of charge in copper wire1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which is the predominant carrier of charge in copper wire?

A. Proton.

  • Electron.

  • Ion.

  • All of the above.


If a neutral atom has 22 protons in its nucleus the number of surrounding electrons is

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

If a neutral atom has 22 protons in its nucleus, the number of surrounding electrons is

A. less than 22.

  • 22.

  • more than 22.

    D. sometimes all of the above in a neutral atom.


If a neutral atom has 22 protons in its nucleus the number of surrounding electrons is1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

If a neutral atom has 22 protons in its nucleus, the number of surrounding electrons is

A. less than 22.

  • 22.

  • more than 22.

  • sometimes all of the above in a neutral atom.


When we say charge is conserved we mean that charge can

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When we say charge is conserved, we mean that charge can

A. be saved, like money in a bank.

  • only be transferred from one place to another.

  • take equivalent forms.

    D. be created or destroyed, as in nuclear reactions.


When we say charge is conserved we mean that charge can1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When we say charge is conserved, we mean that charge can

A. be saved, like money in a bank.

  • only be transferred from one place to another.

  • take equivalent forms.

  • be created or destroyed, as in nuclear reactions.

    Explanation:

    Electric charge cannot be created or destroyed. It can only be transferred.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

According to Coulomb’s law, a pair of particles that are placed twice as close to each other will experience forces that are

A. twice as strong.

  • four times as strong.

  • half as strong.

  • one-quarter as strong.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

According to Coulomb’s law, a pair of particles that are placed twice as close to each other will experience forces that are

A. twice as strong.

  • four times as strong.

  • half as strong.

  • one-quarter as strong.

    Explanation:

    Coulomb’s law is an inverse-square law.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

According to Coulomb’s law, doubling both charges of a pair of particles will result in a force between them that is

A. twice as strong.

  • four times as strong.

  • half as strong.

    D. one-quarter as strong.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

According to Coulomb’s law, doubling both charges of a pair of particles will result in a force between them that is

A. twice as strong.

  • four times as strong.

  • half as strong.

  • one-quarter as strong.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When a negatively charged balloon is placed against a nonconducting wall, negative charges in the wall are

A. attracted to the balloon.

  • repelled from the balloon.

  • too bound to positive charges in the wall to have any effect.

    D. neutralized.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When a negatively charged balloon is placed against a nonconducting wall, negative charges in the wall are

A. attracted to the balloon.

  • repelled from the balloon.

  • too bound to positive charges in the wall to have any effect.

  • neutralized.

    Explanation:

    The negative balloon repels negative charge in the wall and attracts positive charge. Charges of atoms and molecules are therefore nudged apart. This condition of charge separation is called polarization.


The strength of an electric field is measured by the force

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The strength of an electric field is measured by the force

A. exerted on a charge in the field.

  • between electric field lines.

  • between oppositely charged parallel plates.

    D. all of the above.


The strength of an electric field is measured by the force1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The strength of an electric field is measured by the force

A. exerted on a charge in the field.

  • between electric field lines.

  • between oppositely charged parallel plates.

  • all of the above.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The direction of an electric field, by convention, is the direction of force that the field would exert on

A. an electron.

  • a proton.

  • an atom.

    D. all of the above.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The direction of an electric field, by convention, is the direction of force that the field would exert on

A. an electron.

  • a proton.

  • an atom.

  • all of the above.


When you do work on an electrically charged particle you change the particle s

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When you do work on an electrically charged particle, you change the particle’s

A. charge.

  • potential energy.

  • capacitance.

    D. power.


When you do work on an electrically charged particle you change the particle s1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When you do work on an electrically charged particle, you change the particle’s

A. charge.

  • potential energy.

  • capacitance.

  • power.

    Comment:

    Recall the work–energy theorem in Chapter 3.


When you increase the potential energy of a charged particle you increase its ability to

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When you increase the potential energy of a charged particle, you increase its ability to

A. do work.

  • charge other particles.

  • conduct.

    D. transform to heat.


When you increase the potential energy of a charged particle you increase its ability to1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When you increase the potential energy of a charged particle, you increase its ability to

A. do work.

  • charge other particles.

  • conduct.

  • transform to heat.

    Comment:

    Recall from Chapter 3 that the potential energy acquired by something equals the work done on it.


Electric potential measured in volts is a ratio of

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Electric potential, measured in volts, is a ratio of

A. charge to the square of the separation distance.

  • current to resistance.

  • energy to charge.

    D. power to current.


Electric potential measured in volts is a ratio of1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Electric potential, measured in volts, is a ratio of

A. charge to the square of the separation distance.

  • current to resistance.

  • energy to charge.

  • power to current.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A party balloon may be charged to thousands of volts. The charged balloon isn’t dangerous because it carries relatively little

A. current.

  • energy.

  • capacitance.

  • resistance.


Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A party balloon may be charged to thousands of volts. The charged balloon isn’t dangerous because it carries relatively little

A. current.

  • energy.

  • capacitance.

  • resistance.


A coulomb of charge that passes through a 12 volt battery is given

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A coulomb of charge that passes through a 12-volt battery is given

A. 12 joules.

  • 12 amperes.

  • 12 ohms.

    D. 12 watts.


A coulomb of charge that passes through a 12 volt battery is given1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A coulomb of charge that passes through a 12-volt battery is given

A. 12 joules.

  • 12 amperes.

  • 12 ohms.

  • 12 watts.

    Explanation:

    Voltage = energy/charge; (12 V)/(1 C) = 12 J/C.


Which statement is correct

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which statement is correct?

A. Voltage flows in a circuit.

  • Charge flows in a circuit.

  • Current causes voltage.

    D. All the above are correct.


Which statement is correct1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Which statement is correct?

A. Voltage flows in a circuit.

  • Charge flows in a circuit.

  • Current causes voltage.

  • All of the above are correct.

    Explanation:

    Voltage is established across a circuit, not through it. Also, voltage causes current, and not the other way around.


A 10 ohm resistor carries 10 amperes the voltage across the resistor is

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 10-ohm resistor carries 10 amperes. The voltage across the resistor is

A. zero.

  • more than zero but less than 10 V.

  • 10 V.

    D. more than 10 V.


A 10 ohm resistor carries 10 amperes the voltage across the resistor is1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 10-ohm resistor carries 10 amperes. The voltage across the resistor is

A. zero.

  • more than zero but less than 10 V.

  • 10 V.

  • more than 10 V.

    Explanation:

    The voltage, in accord with Ohm’s law, is 100 V, much greater than 10 V.


A 10 ohm resistor is connected to a 120 volt power supply the current in the resistor is

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 10-ohm resistor is connected to a 120-volt power supply. The current in the resistor is

A. 1 A.

  • 10 A.

  • 12 A.

    D. 120 A.


A 10 ohm resistor is connected to a 120 volt power supply the current in the resistor is1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 10-ohm resistor is connected to a 120-volt power supply. The current in the resistor is

A. 1 A.

  • 10 A.

  • 12 A.

  • 120 A.

    Explanation:

    By Ohm’s law, current = voltage/resistance = 120 V/10 ohm =

    12 A.


A major difference between dc and ac in circuits is the

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A major difference between DC and AC in circuits is the

A. voltage associated with each.

  • timing associated with each.

  • way charges flow.

    D. way circuits are wired.


A major difference between dc and ac in circuits is the1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A major difference between DC and AC in circuits is the

A. voltage associated with each.

  • timing associated with each.

  • way charges flow.

  • way circuits are wired.

    Explanation:

    In a DC circuit, charge flows in one direction; in AC, charge flows to and fro, alternating direction.


A 120 volt line carries 20 amperes the power expended is

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 120-volt line carries 20 amperes. The power expended is

A. 6 watts.

  • 20 watts.

  • 120 watts.

    D. 2400 watts.


A 120 volt line carries 20 amperes the power expended is1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A 120-volt line carries 20 amperes. The power expended is

A. 6 watts.

  • 20 watts.

  • 120 watts.

  • 2400 watts.

    Explanation:

    Power = voltage  current.


How much current is in a 120 volt line at 1200 watts

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

How much current is in a 120-volt line at 1200 watts?

A. 6 amperes.

  • 10 amperes.

  • 120 amperes.

    D. 240 amperes.


How much current is in a 120 volt line at 1200 watts1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

How much current is in a 120-volt line at 1200 watts?

A. 6 amperes.

  • 10 amperes.

  • 120 amperes.

  • 240 amperes.

    Explanation:

    From Power = voltage  current, current = power/voltage =

    1200 W/120 V = 10 A.


What is the power rating of a lamp connected to a 12 v source when it carries 1 5 a

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

What is the power rating of a lamp connected to a 12-V source when it carries 1.5 A?

A. 8 W.

  • 12 W.

  • 18 W.

    D. None of the above.


What is the power rating of a lamp connected to a 12 v source when it carries 1 5 a1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

What is the power rating of a lamp connected to a 12-V source when it carries 1.5 A?

A. 8 W.

  • 12 W.

  • 18 W.

  • None of the above.

    Explanation:

    Power = voltage  current = 12 V  1.5 A = 18 W.


Iron paper clips are strongly attracted to

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Iron paper clips are strongly attracted to

A. the north pole of a magnet.

  • the south pole of a magnet.

  • either the north or south pole of a magnet.

    D. none of the above.


Iron paper clips are strongly attracted to1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Iron paper clips are strongly attracted to

A. the north pole of a magnet.

  • the south pole of a magnet.

  • either the north or south pole of a magnet.

  • none of the above.

    Explanation:

    Magnetic domains in the clips are induced into alignment in much the same way that electric charges are induced when polarized.


Moving electric charged particles can interact with

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Moving electric charged particles can interact with

A. an electric field.

  • a magnetic field.

  • both of the above.

    D. neither of the above.


Moving electric charged particles can interact with1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Moving electric charged particles can interact with

A. an electric field.

  • a magnetic field.

  • both of the above.

  • neither of the above.


When a magnetized compass is placed in a magnetic field it aligns with the field because of

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When a magnetized compass is placed in a magnetic field, it aligns with the field because of

A. attracting forces between the compass and the field.

  • torques on the magnet.

  • magnetic domains in the compass needle.

    D. all of the above.


When a magnetized compass is placed in a magnetic field it aligns with the field because of1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

When a magnetized compass is placed in a magnetic field, it aligns with the field because of

A. attracting forces between the compass and the field.

  • torques on the magnet.

  • magnetic domains in the compass needle.

  • all of the above.


Surrounding moving electric charges are

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Surrounding moving electric charges are

A. electric fields.

  • magnetic fields.

  • both of the above.

    D. neither of the above.


Surrounding moving electric charges are1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

Surrounding moving electric charges are

A. electric fields.

  • magnetic fields.

  • both of the above.

  • neither of the above.


A magnetic force cannot act on an electron when it

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A magnetic force cannot act on an electron when it

A. is at rest.

  • moves parallel to magnetic field lines.

  • both of the above.

    D. neither of the above.


A magnetic force cannot act on an electron when it1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A magnetic force cannot act on an electron when it

A. is at rest.

  • moves parallel to magnetic field lines.

  • both of the above.

  • neither of the above.

    Explanation:

    A force is exerted on charged particles only when they move at an angle to magnetic field lines. The force is greatest when motion is at right angles to the magnetic field, and it is zero when motion is parallel to the field.


The fact that a force is exerted on a current carrying wire in a magnetic field underlies

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The fact that a force is exerted on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field underlies

A. motors.

  • electric meters.

  • both of the above.

    D. neither of the above.


The fact that a force is exerted on a current carrying wire in a magnetic field underlies1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

The fact that a force is exerted on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field underlies

A. motors.

  • electric meters.

  • both of the above.

  • neither of the above.


A motor and a generator are

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A motor and a generator are

A. similar devices.

  • very different devices with different applications.

  • forms of transformers.

    D. energy sources.


A motor and a generator are1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A motor and a generator are

A. similar devices.

  • very different devices with different applications.

  • forms of transformers.

  • energy sources.

    Explanation:

    The main difference in a motor and generator is energy input and output, which are opposite for each.


A voltage will be induced in a wire loop when the magnetic field within that loop

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A voltage will be induced in a wire loop when the magnetic field within that loop

A. changes.

  • aligns with the electric field.

  • is at right angles to the electric field.

    D. converts to magnetic energy.


A voltage will be induced in a wire loop when the magnetic field within that loop1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

A voltage will be induced in a wire loop when the magnetic field within that loop

A. changes.

  • aligns with the electric field.

  • is at right angles to the electric field.

  • converts to magnetic energy.


An electric field is induced in any region of space in which

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

An electric field is induced in any region of space in which

A. a magnetic field changes with time.

  • a magnetic field’s orientation is at right angles to the electric field.

  • the accompanying electric field undergoes changes in time.

    D. all of the above.


An electric field is induced in any region of space in which1

Conceptual Integrated Science—Chapter 7

An electric field is induced in any region of space in which

A. a magnetic field changes with time.

  • a magnetic field’s orientation is at right angles to the electric field.

  • the accompanying electric field undergoes changes in time.

  • all of the above.

    Comment:

    Quite wonderfully, changing electric and magnetic fields produce light!


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