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Race to the Top. Building Capacity Using Value-Added in School Improvement . Ohio RttT Webinar Presented by Battelle for Kids June 21, 2011. Race to the Top. Building Capacity Statewide Building LEA Capacity Building School Capacity Building Teacher-Team Capacity. Race to the Top.

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Building Capacity Using Value-Added in School Improvement

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Race to the Top

Building Capacity Using Value-Added in School Improvement

Ohio RttT Webinar

Presented by Battelle for Kids

June 21, 2011


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Race to the Top

  • Building Capacity Statewide

  • Building LEA Capacity

  • Building School Capacity

  • Building Teacher-Team Capacity


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Race to the Top

Value-Added & Race to the Top Key Deliverables

  • Teacher-Level Value-Added Reporting

    • 30% of LEAs Link in Year 1 RttT (reports received fall 2011) - primarily LEAs in Battelle for Kids’ expanded value-added report projects along with some SIG schools

    • 60% of all RttT LEAs in Year 2

    • 100% of all LEAs in Ohio in Years 3 & 4

  • Professional development & resources will address the use of value-added for school improvement and implications of teacher-level reporting


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Race to the Top

Support Resources

  • Value-Added Toolkits—will be updated (fall 2011)

    • Problem-based approach

    • Key reports organized by audience

  • Refresh of Value-Added On-line Courses (occurred June 1)

    • Greater interactivity

    • Condensed and practical

  • Webinar Series

    • June 7 @ 3 p.m.—Value-Added: Then, Now and in the Future

    • June 9 @ 3 p.m.—Link Before You Leap

    • June 21 @ 2:30 p.m.—Building Capacity Using Value-Added in School Improvement

    • June 23 @ 2:30 p.m.—Implications of Teacher-Level Value-Added Data


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Race to the Top

  • Value-Added Leader Support System

    • 60 regional-level Value-Added Leaders (VALs)

    • 1-2 VALs from each of the Big 8 urban districts

    • 1-2 VALs from each of the 8 largest suburban districts with 10,000+ students

    • Several designated to work with the community schools

    • In total, a cadre of 90-100 VALs to support the efforts available to all LEAs in Ohio (not just RttT LEAs)

    • VALs will be confirmed by the end of June, trained in August and ready to assist LEAs this fall


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Race to the Top

Face-to-Face Training Opportunities for LEAs

  • Fall 2011: District Value-Added Leadership (DVAL) team training

    • 2-Day events offered regionally in Sept.-Oct.

    • LEAs will have two different date opportunities to choose from in their area

    • Focus on both value-added uses in school improvement & teacher-level reporting

    • VALs will play the role of table facilitators with the DVAL teams during these events

  • 2011-2012 school year: VALs are available upon request & available to work with DVAL teams in their district/LEA as they work with building and teacher teams

  • Fall 2011: 2-Day trainings for community school building teams

    • Similar to the work mentioned above that is offered to districts/LEAs

    • Sponsors are encouraged to attend & support their buildings

  • In years 3 and 4 of RttT, there will be more face-to-face opportunities for training on value-added.


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Race to the Top

Value-Added Toolkit

  • Problem-based approach

    • How much growth was produced grade level-by-grade level across your school?

    • Which students benefited most (and least) from your school’s curriculum & instruction?

    • What other schools in your district or across the state performed well with particular groups of students?

    • (Teacher-Level) How can members of your team use each teacher’s individual strengths to improve the performance of the entire team?

  • Key reports organized by audience

    • District, Building, Teacher

  • Fall distribution


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Race to the Top

  • Built a statewide structure of support for value-added use, with focus on Regional Value-Added Specialists, District Value-Added Specialists and principals

  • Established a context for value-added use in Ohio

    • Educators understand the “why” for measuring growth, the basics of value-added analysis, and how to access & interpret reports

  • Provided a variety of resources and support opportunities

  • Provided opportunities for districts/LEAs to receive expanded

  • value-added reporting beyond what the state provides

    • E.g. Grade 3, science & social studies; high school

The Value-Added Work Accomplished in Ohio To Date


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Race to the Top

  • Eliminate barriers to reporting

    • Focus the past two years was on improving Ohio’s system

    • e.g. student names, all students for diagnostic reports versus just Where Kids Count students, ability to include prior student data of migrant students coming from another LEA

  • Strengthen the leadership support (principals, superintendents, community school sponsors)

  • Get to the teacher-based-team level & provide the process and resources to address the “now what?”

  • Integrate value-added use in school improvement processes

  • Eliminate two EVAAS systems for those districts/LEAs receiving expanded value-added reporting

Lessons Learned


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Improvement Focus


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  • Look for patterns in student performance data at the appropriate level of the system

  • Use data to uncover your strengths and your challenges

  • Explore root causes of your highest priority strengths and challenges

  • Focus improvement in limited number of areas

  • (1 to 2)

The Keys to Improvement


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Putting Data Together Looking at Value-Added & Achievement Data

Example of a Progress and Achievement Matrix


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Finding Patterns


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Exploring Root Causes

Building-Level Strength Fishbone


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Race to the Top

How Can We Build Capacity In Our District/LEA?


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What District Level Leaders Should Know

People are down on what they are not up on..

If school leaders do not prepare teachers and the public to be well-informed about what value-added results are saying and how they should and should not be used, concerns and recalcitrance will be heightened.


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What District Level Teams Should Know

  • Don’t assume building leaders/principals know how to interpret value-added reports

  • Provide tangible action steps and expectations for BLTs to follow for preparing and sharing value-added data with teachers

  • Expect that staff use value-added information to inform improvement plans

  • BLTs may need support to translate data into goals or action steps


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What District Level Teams

Should Know

  • Don’t wait to give teachers accurate information about teacher-level reports

  • Send a team to the DVALT training in your region

  • BLTs may need support to translate data into goals or action steps


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Race to the Top

How Can I Build Capacity in My School?


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What Building Level Leaders Should Know

  • Use value-added information to:

    • Determine program efficacy

    • Systematically identify strengths and challenges

    • Stimulate discussions during the school year about ongoing measures of student growth

    • Customize professional development based on student growth patterns

    • Create Student Pattern Lists in EVAAS to:

      • Pair teachers with students with whom they are most successful

      • Partner teachers with other teachers who may complement their strengths

    • Identify students who are not making sufficient progress and design intervention plans


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What Building Level Leaders Should Know

  • Build a culture of data use, sharing and support:

  • Teachers and parents need to be well-informed about what value-added results are saying and how they should and should not be used

  • Use progress and achievement data to model problem-based learning strategies

  • Encourage team-based learning and goal setting

  • Value-added reports and achievement data that are provided by the grade and subject level are especially useful for grade-level and department-level teams to determine patterns and identify improvement priorities


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Race to the Top

Building Capacity at the Teacher-Team Level


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  • Collectively, the members of teams have a greater potential to produce measurable improvement than do individual teachers. Teams:

  • Include more points of view and strengths

  • Are more likely to solve difficult problems

  • Have a higher level of accountability than do individuals

  • Provide mutual support that is readily available on a team but is less available for individuals who are going it alone

Building Capacity at the Teacher-Team Level


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  • Team-level data is simply the aggregate of teacher data BUT…

  • Although teams can study data, make decisions and support change processes, it is individual teachers who act

  • Real improvement hinges on whether individual teachers can change the dynamics in individual classrooms

  • Teams only make this difficult process more productive

Building Capacity at the Teacher-Team Level


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Building Capacity at the Teacher-Team Level

  • Value-added reports and achievement data that are provided by the grade and subject level are especially useful for grade-level and department-level teams to determine patterns and identify improvement priorities

  • Members of teacher-teams can also share individual teacher-level value-added and classroom achievement data results with each other

  • Teachers can share their individual teacher-level value-added results with peers in a public way or can privately contribute the knowledge gained from their own reports to the team’s improvement work


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Building Capacity at the Teacher-Team Level

  • Replicate the regional training in your school with teacher-teams

    • Teachers can determine how their results align are the rest of the grade- and/or subject-level team within their school or across schools

    • Teams can set few but meaningful goals based on their progress and achievement data

  • Establish a progress monitoring system to determine the progress being made by students

  • Keep the data conversations ongoing—make it part of your culture and routine


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Race to the Top

Additional Webinars

  • June 7 @ 3 p.m.—Value-Added: Then, Now and in the Future

  • June 9 @ 3 p.m.—Link Before You Leap

  • June 21 @ 2:30 p.m.—Building Capacity Using Value-Added in School Improvement

  • June 23 @ 2:30 p.m.—Implications of Teacher-Level Value-Added Data


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Race to the Top

Additional Resources

Contacts:

Battelle for Kids

Mary Peters, [email protected]

Help Desk, [email protected] or (866) 543-7555


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